Council urged to find “long term” solution for digestate spreading in Grianan Estate

first_imgA local Donegal County Councillor has urged the local authority to find a long term solution for the spreading of digestate in Inishowen that took place over the summer to ensure it doesn’t happen again.The foul stench left hundreds of homes in the Grianan Estate in Burt affected by the smell, with schoolchildren being reportedly left sick and a family unable to bury a loved one in the area as a result.Residents and business owners filled Burt Hall in July in a public meeting to express their views over the issue.  Finn Valley company, Glenmore Estates, who attended the meeting, denied spreading chicken excrement, insisting it was what they described as digestate.Cllr Jack Murray said full commitment was needed to stop the spreading of the substance permanently in the future.He said: “There is a danger that this substance could be spread again in the future and that simply cannot be the case.“The company believe that pelleting would be a better option because that could potentially stop the smell, but I would ask the council to investigate the environmental effects that could have. “I would still question whether the substance would still be able to seep into the ground.“The spreading hasn’t taken place over the last couple of month but we need a commitment that it will not take place again in the long term.“It is not acceptable or fair on the residents and businesses in the area.”Council urged to find “long term” solution for digestate spreading in Grianan Estate was last modified: October 29th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

Ultra low-fare Spirit launches eight new routes

first_imgUltra unbundled Spirit Airlines, perhaps the most extreme example of low-fare U.S. carriers, just launched eight new routes aimed at filling in gaps in its route system.The upshot is more cheap seat options for consumers willing to pay extra for virtually every amenity on the aircraft.On May 25,  Spirit launched nonstop service from Baltimore/Washington (BWI) to Oakland on a seasonal basis. A couple of other year-round trans-cons also were begun: BWI – San Diego and BWI – Seattle/Tacoma.The new Baltimore/Washington routes increase Spirit’s ability to compete a bit more with BWI powerhouse Southwest Airlines, which unbundles its product far less aggressively than Spirit.  Southwest’s popular ‘Bags Fly Free’ policy is illustrative of the strategy.At the same time the BWI routes took off, Spirit began flying nonstop from Detroit to Oakland and Seattle/Tacoma on a seasonal basis.Finally, Spirit just launched a trio of new nonstops from New Orleans (MSY) to Baltimore/Washington, Cleveland and Orlando.The start of the new runs comes as  Spirit has taken delivery of its 100th Airbus narrowbody. The carrier flies A320 family jets, and it paints them vivid yellow.There are a couple of advantages to this: first (and arguably most important) they’re easy for other airplanes to spot aloft in crowded airspace. Second, they stand out unmistakably on congested airport ramps. Spirit can use them as flying billboards.The last time a U.S. airline slathered its entire fleet with this much yellow was during the days of Northeast Airlines’ ‘Yellow Birds.’ Even then the upper portions of the aircraft were white. Northeast merged with Delta in 1972.last_img read more

Read More →

Africa Day: Get your funk on with five great musical tributes to the continent

first_imgFrom Sly to Fela, reggae to hip-hop, the world is indebted to the rich musical and cultural history of Africa. Here are five examples of that influence.Nigerian Afro-funk superstar Fela Kuti was a pioneer in bringing African music to global audiences in the 1970s. Fusing political consciousness with catchy funk rhythms, Kuti and his evolving musical collective, Africa 70, influenced a host of modern hip-hop, electronica and jazz artists. (Image: Wikipedia)CD AndersonThe world of music owes its origins and a monumental debt of gratitude to the rhythms and melodies of Africa. From the continent’s rich oral storytelling traditions that evolved into spoken word poetry and hip-hop, to the mournful makeshift simplicity of acoustic music that became blues and jazz, and powerful natural percussions that would ultimately get the rest of the world dancing to rock, reggae and funk, Africa is truly the ground zero of the global heartbeat.To celebrate Africa Day, here are just five examples of that overwhelming musical influence, five deep cuts from legendary African and global artists that not only pay tribute to Africa, but also celebrate its people and the undeniable pulse that those of us who live here feel every day.Fela Kuti — LadyNigerian Afro-funk superstar Fela Kuti was more than just another musician; he was a cultural movement, a religion and a seismic introduction to African music for the rest of the world.With pulsating, addictive hit singles and electric live performances, Kuti and his ever-growing music and dance entourage, Africa 70, travelled the world delivering uncompromising, unashamed African pride.Kuti’s Afro-funk sounds influenced some of the world’s biggest hip-hop, electronic and jazz artists seeking to push the envelope of music.The Meters — AfricaThe premier New Orleans soul funk family was the bridge between the motherland and the Caribbean, the old and the new worlds. On this tribute to the continent, The Meters tinge their swampy soul music with just enough voodoo rhythm and lyrical legend-building to get people thinking while dancing.Sly and the Family Stone — Thank you for talking to me AfricaSly Stone’s multicultural musical collective ruled both white and black airwaves in the 1960s and 1970s with charged political statements wrapped up in catchy musical hooks. And while much of their music owed more to the trailblazing funk soul of James Brown and rock sensibilities of Jimi Hendrix, the Family Stone’s tight rhythm section – led by bass guitar innovator Larry Graham – had their feet firmly planted in Kuti’s Africa.BCUC — YindeSouth Africa’s best kept musical secret, more appreciated around the rest of the world and on the continent than at home, Soweto’s Bantu Continua Uhuru Consciousness (BCUC) offer genre-bending musical theatre and triumphant black consciousness, telling African stories using African methods of dance, words and art.Lee Scratch Perry — African FreedomThe musical connections between Jamaica and Africa are steeped in their shared political and cultural history, and that marriage of sound and fury are best embodied by the father of dub reggae, Lee Scratch Perry.From Haile Selassie to Nelson Mandela, the celebration of Africa’s heroes is vital to reggae’s undying spirit and its continued popularity around the world.Source: Wikipedia, YouTubeWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Read More →

Nation Branding in action: reaching the masses in 2018

first_imgIt is imperative that one takes the time out to look back and reflect on the efforts put into achieving a successful year. To review the work and the impact it has unearthed and most importantly opportunities that arose to help leverage in improving the mandate that Brand South Africa has to fulfil.As the custodian of the Nation Brand, tasked with marketing and managing its image, Brand South Africa makes efforts to continuously engage and collaborate with stakeholders in business, government and civil society. To articulate and get support in order to strengthen the Nation Brand’s competitiveness.Reflecting on the economic, political and social landscape, 2018 was an eventful year in South Africa. For Brand South Africa, it meant we had our work cut out for us in ensuring we continue to drive a positive narrative of the Nation Brand that inspires its people and is admired globally.Our flagship programme, Play Your Part, made positive strides reaching over 12 million people, encouraging South Africans to be active citizens, for corporates to strive for a positive footprint that influences and contributes to the upliftment of our communities.Let’s, for a moment take a trip down memory lane, some of the most creative – and award-winning – campaigns executed over the past financial year with the help of our creative agency – The ODD number.Over the past year, Brand South Africa, and our 100% Black Owned Advertising Agency, The Odd Number were proud recipients of multiple awards at the Loeries Awards. A testament to the messaging that resonates with citizens, the creative executions went on to win other awards such as the coveted Marklives Ad of the Year, Pendorings, and a couple of Ad of The Month awards. A proud moment for us indeed!The year ahead promises to be a great one for the country as we celebrate 25 years of democracy and for Brand South Africa as we strategically utilise challenges to further strengthen the Nation Brand image, and together with our partners we’re looking forward to inspiring new ways for our beloved Mzansi and the whole world to see.last_img read more

Read More →

‘Don’t let conflict undermine Africa’s gains’

first_img30 January 2014The 22nd Ordinary Session of the African Union Assembly got under way in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on Thursday with a call by the continent’s leaders for the silencing of the guns and for peace to prevail on the continent.This as the conflict in the Central African Republic and South Sudan has driven hundreds of thousands of people from their homes, creating a humanitarian crisis in which has been condemned by the United Nations.“Our hearts are with the people of the Central African Republic and South Sudan as they continue to be victims of this conflict,” said African Union Commission chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma.Last week, the AU welcomed the agreement reached by the warring South Sudanese parties on the cessation of hostilities and the status of detainees.The agreement, aimed at ending weeks of fighting that has left thousands dead and displaced, was reached at the talks in the Ethiopian capital between the South Sudanese government and rebels loyal to former vice-president Riek Machar. The talks were held under the mediation of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and the signing of the pact was witnessed by AU peace and security commissioner Smail Chergui.Dlamini Zuma told a packed hall, which included heads of state from the 54 AU member countries, former presidents and delegates from the United Nations, that the continental body would continue to mediate in the war-torn countries until a lasting solution was found.Outgoing African Union chairperson, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, said the emerging conflicts risked escalating into a crisis that could undermine the gains made in recent years.“It is imperative that the peace process succeeds and all parties demonstrate the necessary political leadership and compromise to achieve peace and durable reconciliation,” Desalegn said.Desalegn said the situation in Central African Republic (CAR) remained concerning, particularly the senseless violence that has taken a heavy toll on civilians. He called on world leaders to support the African-led Peace Support Mission in the CAR, which has been deployed there to restore peace and security in order for that country to return to constitutional order.United Nations Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson also weighed in, calling on the AU to “do all it can” to protect civilians in South Sudan.“The situation in Central African Republic is of concern for all of us,” Eliasson said. “It is the objective of the United Nations to put an end to these atrocities; we need to act without delay.”Tribute to MandelaA moment of silence was held at the start of the summit in remembrance of the late Nelson Mandela, who died in December. The plenary hall of the AU’s headquarters, the largest building where AU summits are held, has been named after the former South African statesman.South African President Jacob Zuma took the floor to thank Africa for the hospitality it had extended to Mandela and his comrades during the struggle for liberation in his country.Zuma said that while Mandela had carried a South African passport, he had in fact been a citizen of the world and Africa.“Madiba has left us a legacy that all of us must keep alive,” Zuma said.Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz was elected as the new chairperson of the African Union, succeeding Desalegn, who has been at the helm for the past year.Later in the day, the heads of state will launch the year 2014 as the Year of Agriculture and Food Security, marking the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP).They will consider the report of the Peace and Security Council on its activities and the state of peace and security in Africa, including the activities of the Panel of the Wise alongside the renewal of its membership.The heads of state will also consider the report on the assessment of the African Standby Force and the operationalization of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises, as well as launch the final report of the High Level Panel on Fragile States.The so-called Agenda 2063 will also be considered, with the final adoption expected at the 23rd AU summit later this year.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Read More →

Farmers and ranchers call for “Tax Relief Tuesday”

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With the holiday season in full swing and the year quickly coming to an end, farmers and ranchers are urging Congress to reinstate and extend expired tax provisions that help improve the economic viability and stability of our food, fiber and fuel production. Farmers need provisions like section 179 small business expensing and bonus depreciation to help them make business purchases while dealing with uncontrollable weather and unpredictable markets.This fall, Farm Bureau and more than 2,000 other companies and organizations sent a letter to lawmakers explaining why these provisions, most of which expired at the end of 2014, are so important. And today we’re calling for a “Tax Relief Tuesday” to finally bring farmers, ranchers, and other small business owners across the country the relief and predictability they need for economic growth. Failure to pass a bill extending these provisions amounts to a tax increase.Farmers and ranchers need a tax code that gives them certainty for long-term business decisions that can grow and expand their operations.Earlier this year, Congress took steps toward bringing these tax provisions back for 2015 and possibly longer. Back in July, the Senate Finance Committee extended through 2016 a package of tax provisions, including a number of those important to farmers and ranchers.The Farm Bureau-supported provisions in the tax extender package include:Section 179 Small Business Expensing: The maximum amount that a small business can immediately expense when purchasing business assets instead of depreciating them over time is $25,000. Last year, the maximum amount was $500,000, reduced dollar for dollar when expenditures exceed $2 million.Bonus depreciation: An additional 50% bonus depreciation for the purchase of new capital assets, including agricultural equipment.Incentives for renewable fuels and energy, including biodiesel, wind power and refueling property.An enhanced deduction for donated food.A provision encouraging donations of conservation easements. On the House side in February, lawmakers passed the permanent extension of Section 179 small business expensing (H.R. 636), the tax deduction for donating food (H.R. 644) and the tax deduction for donating conservation easements (H.R. 644). In addition, the House Ways and Means Committee in September approved a bill (H.R. 2510) to permanently extend 50% bonus deprecation. The measure would also expand the provision to include fruit- and nut-bearing plants with pre-productive periods of two or more years.It’s time for Congress to finish what they started. Delaying these tax extenders will only delay economic growth and prevent farmers and ranchers from reinvesting in their businesses and local communities. Join Farm Bureau in calling on Congress to bring small businesses across the country the tax relief they need.last_img read more

Read More →

Nitrogen concerns for Ohio?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Over the past month or so, I participated in three conferences on nutrient loss. While many speakers addressed phosphorus concerns, several mentioned nitrogen as the next target. I focused on the nitrogen talks.So lets talk about nitrogen management. It leaks, like everywhere. Up and down — up as a gas when the soils are saturated and moves down and out with water movement. By my estimate we mineralized 100 pounds of N per acre in 2017, and probably lost 100 pounds or more in many spots to leaching and to denitrification. Even though 80% of the atmosphere is N, we still have to supply it for our grass crops. And we add more than we need, because we don’t want to be short. That’s an economic concern. So what can we do about managing nitrogen?The current tool to make nitrogen recommendations for corn in Ohio is the CNR, which stands for Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator. The tool is housed at Iowa State University and includes our Ohio data in the model: http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu. The model includes the neighboring states of Indiana and Michigan. A total of seven states are involved in the tool.How do you determine your N rate for your crop? The old rule of thumb was 1.2 pounds of N for every bushel of your yield goal. So in the old days for 200-bushel per acre corn, apply 240 units of N. But genetics, economics and environmental concerns have changed that thinking. And we have learned that yield goal is not a factor in setting your N rate. Let me repeat that: Yield Goal is Not a Factor in Setting the N Rate. It comes down to site and weather. And it is very possible that the lowest yielding field on your farm requires the most nitrogen.Economic based nitrogen calculators have been around since about 2005, they are used to calculate the economic optimum rate of nitrogen. In the recent past with high nitrogen prices and low corn prices, we were looking for the minimum rate to maximize economic yield. Then we went through the high grain prices of 2008 to 2014 and no one worried as much about the economic concerns. Today is different, again.I made a run on the CNRC with my numbers for next spring — corn at $3.50, N priced at $0.35 per unit N, in Ohio, in a corn/soybean rotation. Our most profitable recommended rate of N would be 175 pounds, with a profitable range from 158 to 191. The “profitable range” is within $1 per acre of the recommended rate. These numbers will change slightly as we add more data to the system from recent nitrogen rate trials. Keep checking back. Why don’t I throw in a factor for the site and weather?  That is somewhat covered by selecting Ohio as the state — that will get you to average soils, rainfall, and growing conditions. But because we don’t have enough information from the past to calculate the future, that means you may have to look for a way to incorporate “this” growing season into a nitrogen rate calculation.Do try out the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator on you own, with your prices. It is at http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu. And perhaps think about how to most efficiently use that rate of nitrogen. What practices can you use to keep N where you put it, and keep it for crop needs?What is the right source — NH3 vs. 28% or urea, manure?N is basically the same, generally it goes into the crop as a nitrate. Do make use of the N in manure — maybe do a PSNT to see what is available. And depending on placement and timing, a stabilizer may be necessary for some sources.Right rate — use an N rate calculator?Use the CNRC. Or there are some other models out there, still a lot to learn with these but their goal is to take in-season information into account when selecting the right rate.Right time — as close to the time for crop needs as possible?Corn needs little nitrogen early in the season, but by V8, V10 or so there is rapid uptake. Perhaps apply 40 to 60 units of N at planting then delay the remainder until V8. Or apply 100 N with anhydrous ammonia pre-plant then use a crop sensor at V8 to determine the needs for the rest of the season. If you use this method it is really useful to have a N-rich strip to compare. It will also be useful to have a zero rate strip to determine what your soil/field is capable of mineralizing. Right place — next to the row, incorporated?Definitely get N into the soil. If we are dry and the nitrogen is on the surface, then it may not get to the crop as quickly as needed but from work I saw from this past summer in western states, this rarely happens. Does N need to be next to the row? Not really, we have enough rain and soil moisture in Ohio that we can put it between the rows and the roots will get to the N.last_img read more

Read More →

In Sundance Movie Paddleton, Limited Space and Time Yield A Genuine Bromance

first_imgDP Nate Miller used some choice road movie tricks with a close-knit team to let Ray Romano and Mark Duplass shine in Netflix’s latest dramedy.One character in Paddleton, which premiered this year at Sundance, was a troublemaker behind the scenes. It was not Mark Duplass‘s middle-aged cancer patient, nor his reforming pessimist neighbor, played by Ray Romano. It was the boxy, red, ’90s-model Nissan Sentra the pair drives for much of the film.“Of course it was the tiniest thing they could find,” laughs DP Nate Miller.Greg Hatton, Nate Miller, and Tadd Sackville-West on the Paddleton set. Photo by Patrick Wymore (courtesy of Netflix).Quarters had to be close for Paddleton‘s misfit duo to convincingly — and clumsily — bond over a six-hour road trip to pick up a prescription that will end Duplass’s character’s life before cancer kills him. With barely enough room in the car for one camera and a person to operate it, the crew removed the Sentra’s passenger seat at one point. Miller insisted that director Alex Lehmann, also a DP, shoot a key scene requiring a 180-pan. Miller watched from a follow car as Lehmann directed the actors and maneuvered the Canon C700FF on a Bazooka. The take shot by the director is the one in the movie.“The whole idea with the film was to make this thing feel as real as possible,” Miller says. “I really love that shot.”The DP was already a close comrade of Lehmann’s. They go back a decade as colleagues, and worked together on Lehmann’s fictional feature debut Blue Jay (2016), also starring Duplass. Miller’s comfort with Paddleton’s creative team and small crew extended to the tools he used. He estimates they shot half the movie handheld, on a Canon C700FF that felt natural on his shoulder.“It was a very improv-heavy film, so we shot with two cameras,” Miller says. “We shot the whole thing in fourteen days, which is kind of crazy — especially for a road movie. [Time is] always the biggest challenge. One thing that I really like to do is be able to shoot the B-roll and all the establishing shots myself. I always try to fight for extra days, usually at the beginning or the end — it’s super important to the story, to let these images of the locations give you a feeling for the place.”Ray Romano and Nate Miller on the Paddleton set. Photo by Patrick Wymore (courtesy of Netflix).Paddleton’s vistas belong to a city outside Los Angeles called Solvang. Known for wineries and Danish heritage made plain in the architecture, Solvang also had a motel-esque apartment building to house Duplass and Romano’s characters, who are simply friendly neighbors before a terminal diagnosis pulls them closer. The two actors are dear friends, Miller observed, and the DP saw Romano flex his strength for dramatic roles even as his character leans on humor as a coping mechanism while his buddy suffers.The style of cinematography remains simple for the raw truths nestled in Paddleton’s comedic ploys. Still, the in-the-moment quality of handheld shots that sometimes linger is deliberate. Miller hopes audiences can feel the relationship unfold as the characters begin to lean on one another, living out a friendship they know will soon expire.“You feel the camera breathing with them,” Miller says.Paddleton hits Netflix February 22nd.Looking for more industry news and insight? Check out these articles.Round Table: Three Film Composers Converge on SundanceTom Cross on Editing First Man and Working with IMAX FootageThe Supervising Sound Editor You’ve Never Heard of Is Quietly Saving MoviesInterview: Adam Salky on Directing Projects with Powerful Emotional ThemesSet Photographer Matt Kennedy on Shooting for Marvel and Morelast_img read more

Read More →