Disturbance, dispersal and marine assemblage structure: A case study from the nearshore Southern Ocean

first_imgDisturbance is a key factor in most natural environments and, globally, disturbance regimes are changing, driven by increased anthropogenic influences, including climate change. There is, however, still a lack of understanding about how disturbance interacts with species dispersal capacity to shape marine assemblage structure. We examined the impact of ice scour disturbance history (2009–2016) on the nearshore seafloor in a highly disturbed region of the Western Antarctic Peninsula by contrasting the response of two groups with different dispersal capacities: one consisting of high-dispersal species (mobile with pelagic larvae) and one of low-dispersal species (sessile with benthic larvae). Piecewise Structural Equation Models were constructed to test multi-factorial predictions of the underlying mechanisms, based on hypothesised responses to disturbance for the two groups. At least two or three disturbance factors, acting at different spatial scales, drove assemblage composition. A comparison between both high- and low-dispersal models demonstrated that these mechanisms are dispersal dependent. Disturbance should not be treated as a single metric, but should incorporate remote and direct disturbance events with consideration of taxa-dispersal and disturbance legacy. These modelling approaches can provide insights into how disturbance shapes assemblages in other disturbance regimes, such as fire-prone forests and trawl fisheries.last_img read more

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General rules, procedures outlined for 2019 IMCA sea­son

first_imgAs to the use of counterfeited IMCA branded products, Root stated the obvious in “Making your own wheel decals is a bad idea.” “Data acquisition results in an extreme advantage for any driver or drivers using it,” noted IMCA President Brett Root. “It is very sophisticated and while costs have come down, still very expen­sive. It is not the direction we want any of our divisions to go.” The use of data acquisition at any sanctioned event, including practice nights and during hot laps, will result in a disqualification and $10,000 fine while use of counterfeited IMCA branded products re­sults in a DQ and $1,000 fine. The Late Model point season begins on May 3 and runs through July 28; the IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National point season for all other divisions began Jan. 1 and continues through Sept. 29. VINTON, Iowa – There aren’t a lot of changes to the general rules and procedures announced today for the 2019 IMCA race season. Both infractions carry 30-day suspensions and the loss of all points for the season. center_img No IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car points will be awarded Aug. 29-Sept. 2 because of the Rac­eSaver Nationals; no Modified, Stock Car, Hobby Stock or Northern SportMod points wlll be given Sept. 2-8 or Sport Compact points on Sept. 3 because of the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nation­als fueled by Casey’s. “Many of our premier events, such as Super Nationals, the Duel In The Desert and Race For Hope, have practice nights where there would be the opportunity to put this type of equipment on,” he added. “The fine for use of data acquisition is the same as the fine for use of electronic traction con­trol because we believe it is an equally serious offense.” Changes in the point structure were limited to the Late Model division: National and state stand­ings will be based on the best 15 finishes in the first 30 starts, no bonus points will be awarded to track champions and points earned at Deery Brothers Summer Series events will not count to­ward national, state or track standings.  Two clarifications in the automatic penalties category, however, should be pointed out to drivers who play fast and loose with the rules in their efforts to get around the track faster.last_img read more

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UNFINISHED BUSINESS: The only thing All-American Emily Hawryschuk is missing is a championship

first_img Comments Published on February 6, 2020 at 1:24 am Contact Tim: [email protected],Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Aline of white-and-purple jerseys all leaned forward, bent at the waist, as though a fence was holding them back. They counted down with the clock — “Five! Four! Three!” — on the screen behind each end zone. The clock hit zero, and everyone lunged forward.For the seventh time in eight years, Northwestern women’s lacrosse had won the national title. Opposite the perennial champions were the newcomers. Some froze on the field. Some stared blankly ahead. It was Syracuse’s first finals appearance, and now, its first defeat.Three hundred and eighty miles from Stony Brook University — host of the 2012 NCAA Tournament final — Emily Hawryschuk watched with mixed emotions. The eighth-grader’s favorite player, Northwestern’s Shannon Smith, would be named Most Outstanding Player of the tournament. After playing the sport for just more than a year at the time, Hawryschuk realized she wanted a national title of her own — for Syracuse. Now a senior and the third-best player in the country — male or female — according to Inside Lacrosse, Hawryschuk has one last chance.“I knew one day I wanted to do just that,” Hawryschuk said, “and I’ve been very vocal about it.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBorn about 90 minutes west of the Carrier Dome, Hawryschuk has been drawn to orange and blue her entire life. Her aunt attended Syracuse. Her father, Nick, grew up in Seneca Falls and discovered Syracuse lacrosse’s notable reputation in the area, he said.But Hawryschuk was known for her ability to play baseball. And soccer. She simply didn’t have the time for or interest in lacrosse — until one night, when Hawryschuk was in seventh grade and Nick picked up a lacrosse stick on his way home from work. He purposefully picked the “worst pocket in the world you’d have to learn on,” figuring Hawryschuk was either going to hate the sport or fall in love with it.“(It was) too shallow,” Nick said, “Made it like a tennis racket to see how she could do with balancing it in there.”Hawryschuk pounded away at the pocket, but no matter what she did, it stayed flat. Eventually, she gave up resisting. She began watching games on TV and practiced the moves she saw. Her balance and hand-eye coordination from the start was uncanny, Nick said. She completely bypassed the awkward phase.By the end of eighth grade, she’d been called up to the varsity lacrosse team at Churchville-Chili Senior (New York) High School. She’d given up baseball and recently joined a travel lacrosse club called Lady Roc. In her first tournament, she quickly made an impression on her club coach, Kerrie Brown.“I didn’t really have to coach her up,” Brown said, “She could just blend in and play.”,Off the field, Hawryschuk made a habit of going to the gym. Her father would prepare workouts for her, consisting mainly of deadlifts, bench presses and pull-ups. She ran sprints in her front lawn.Then, Hawryschuk began to distinguish herself. If Lady Roc had a practice on a Tuesday night, she would stay late after practice, play at home the next day and then text Brown Thursday afternoon, asking if they could pass before practice and if she could show Brown the new move she’d taught herself since Tuesday.“All of a sudden she comes in next practice ripping corners from the 8,” Brown said, “And I’m just like, ‘Well, if you practiced it enough, you’re right.”Just two years after starting the sport, Hawryschuk started varsity as a freshman. She’d already solidified herself as the best player on her club team. She was the Monroe County Division 3 Player of the Year as a sophomore, three years after picking up the sport. But still, something was missing. She wanted to be a champion.When Hawryschuk got her license during her senior year of high school, the first things she put in her Ford F-150 were her sticks and a bag of balls. Sometimes, when she was driving home “to sit on the couch,” she said she’d stop at Dryer Road Park on the way to hone her shot.Hawryschuk stopped playing with Lady Roc the summer after her junior year, as most 11th graders typically do in the program. Following her commitment to Syracuse, the family moved to Victor so they could be closer to campus. There, Hawryschuk led the Blue Devils to the Section V Class B championship. She finished her high school career with 291 goals and 87 assists, but, with Syracuse around the corner, that was over.“I didn’t reminisce that much in high school,” Hawryschuk said, “I was focused on going forward.”,At Syracuse, Hawryschuk said she was no longer “leader of the pack.” She was a freshman, and even in the weight room she found herself just “a little above average.” On the field, head coach Gary Gait worked with her shooting form, trying to change her from a sidearm/underhand shooter to an overhand shooter.By the end of the year, she finished with 38 goals and 48 points, both second-most on the team. She played in all 22 games, the final being a first-round loss to Boston College in the NCAA Tournament. She got to experience some of the emotions Gait and his team did in 2012, and they didn’t sit well.When Hawryschuk went home, 10 reps became 12. The workouts became more focused, and she became more active in structuring new ones every two months with her dad. The workouts became so intense, physically and cardiovascularly, that she said “it’s almost like you never have to run.”Hawryschuk returned her sophomore year to lead SU in goals and points. She noticed herself emerging in the weight room, and more teammates began looking up to her. But what struck Gait was her attention to the little details she was still refining.“It’s just who she is,” Gait said, “She got better with every year. She wanted it. She wanted to be good.”The few times she isn’t near a weight room or a Syracuse building, Hawryschuk is back home in Victor, coaching youth lacrosse to players between kindergarten and 11th grade. The girl who started playing in seventh grade now can’t let go of lacrosse.Last season, she was unequivocally the best player on the team and one of the ACC’s top attack players. Her 75 goals were ninth in the country. The next-closest on the team was then-freshman Meaghan Tyrrell with 37, followed by classmate Megan Carney with 32. Still, Syracuse fell to Northwestern in the NCAA quarterfinals, leaving Hawryschuk with a similar feeling of dissatisfaction.As a senior, Hawryschuk has done a little reminiscing. She’ll miss the bus rides, the “little bondings” on away trips, the karaoke parties, the team trips to the “mansion” in Florida. Unlike in high school, she can’t go much further. The only thing left to accomplish is a championship.“I just want to win,” Hawryschuk said, “That’s the only thing I wanted to do, and that’s still the only thing I want to do now. I want to win a national championship.”Cover photo by Elizabeth Billman | Asst. Photo Editorlast_img read more

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Joy Ride Bikes Owners Take On Olympia Traverse Solo

first_imgFacebook7Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Recreation NorthwestDerik and Michelle Archibald, owners of Joy Ride Bikes in Lacey, Wash., each plan to race in the Olympia Traverse solo. The Olympia Traverse, which takes place Saturday, July 27th, is a multi-sport adventure relay for solo, tandem, relay and company teams celebrating the life cycle of wild salmon, a staple and symbol of the Pacific Northwest.This year is the fourth annual Olympia Traverse, which starts in the Capitol Forest and winds its way into downtown Olympia for a strong finish at Port Plaza. The course includes a 7.4-mile mountain bike, 22-mile road bike, 3.5-mile paddle, 4.5-mile run and a .5-mile trek.Derik and Michelle have owned Joy Ride Bikes, an Olympia Traverse sponsor, for almost seven years and are looking forward to the challenge of performing the multi-sport event as soloists. Joy Ride Bikes was asked to sponsor the inaugural event and Derik and Michelle were excited to be involved with the Traverse in Olympia.“I think it is great having an event like the Olympia Traverse take place and I want to support it,” Derik said, “It is always fun racing on home turf.”The couple formed a relay team the first year. Michelle mountain biked, Derik road biked, their business partner, Luke, paddled, and their neighbor, Erik, ran. Their team won the relay, and it was the first and only time Derik and Michelle raced the event.Derik has been mixing up his workouts for this year’s event with running, rowing, mountain biking and road biking, and is looking forward to trying something totally new. He says he has had such a singular focus on cycling for so many years that this multi-sport race will be a challenge.Michelle says the challenge is her reason for racing the Olympia Traverse solo this year. She has been focusing on Road Cycle Racing for the last five years, and wanted to branch out and race other sports. Along with the challenge, she is also looking forward to the after-race event—the beer garden.The couple is excited for the race and even though they are performing it as soloists, they are looking forward to taking on the challenge together.For more information, visit OlympiaTraverse.com or call 360-739-8458. For pictures from past Olympia Traverse events, visit the Olympia Traverse Media Kit.  About Recreation NorthwestRecreation Northwest is a Bellingham, WA-based non-profit organization dedicated to producing sustainable events promoting public health and wellness; showcasing the recreational amenities; and connecting the business and non-profit communities of the Pacific Northwest. Recreation Northwest hosts a variety of races for solo, tandem, and relay teams, celebrating the life cycle of wild salmon, a staple and symbol of the Pacific Northwest. These races include a multi-sport Traverse series, including the Bellingham Traverse, Olympia Traverse, Winthrop Traverse, and Bellingham Kids Traverse. More recreational events include the Padden MTN Pedal and San Juan Island Quest. For more information, visit RecreationNorthwest.org or call 360-739-8458.last_img read more

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Tigers take the Little 4, beat Ferndale

first_imgThe Arcata Tigers ran through the Ferndale Wildcats in a physical back and forth game, winning 39-26 to claim an outright Little 4 Conference championship, Friday night at the Redwood Bowl.With Friday’s win Arcata (5-1, 6-4) earns its first league title since winning the Big 5 Conference back in 2012.“Our guys are always going to respond,” Arcata head coach Jamal Jones said. “They have a lot of fight, characters and that’s just who they are.Halfway through the first quarter and with …last_img read more

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49ers Tevin Coleman spots difference from Matt Ryan to Jimmy Garoppolo

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Running back Tevin Coleman chuckled when comparing 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo with Atlanta Falcons counterpart Matt Ryan.“He’s smoother in the huddle. He doesn’t get on guys,” Coleman said after Wednesday’s practice. “Matt, he’d get on you. He’d definitely get on you.”Yes, Garoppolo’s cool demeanor apparently remains intact as he returns from last season’s knee injury.Tevin Coleman #26 of the Atlanta Falcons runs the ball against Antoine Bethea #41 of the San Francisco …last_img read more

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Editing a Film to Music (Without it Becoming a Music Video)

first_imgMusic undeniably plays one of the most important roles in the post production process, as it can largely define your film’s style and tone. But choosing the right music for your project is just the beginning.Every film will naturally have different musical and scoring requirements based on the nature of the project and the director’s preferences. Some incredible films have been made that feature little to no music at all, while other equally amazing pieces of work have a score running from start to finish. There is obviously no right or wrong approach when it comes to how much music should be integrated in any given film, or what type of score works best, as these are subjective creative choices that are made on a project to project basis. With that said however, there are some universal truths when it comes to editing your film to music that apply no matter what genre of music you’re working with, or how much score you have in your film.In the past, the most common workflow for having a film’s score created was to simply lock the picture, hand it over to a music supervisor or composer, give your notes, and wait to get something back. While this is obviously still a very common approach, these days we are seeing directors and editors working with pre-existing and royalty free music in their editing sessions as opposed to going through a composer. This can be a very freeing experience when editing (and an approach that I myself have really grown to enjoy), but it does come with it’s own set of challenges. The biggest fundamental consideration is the fact that as a director or an editor, you may not inherently time, mix, and pace the music in the same way that an experienced composer, sound editor, or music supervisor would. In fact, it’s quite common in these situations for the final product to feel overdone, and almost music video-esque.Don’t cut on the beat.This first point is especially relevant if you are working with music that has a rigid percussion track, but can also apply to music without percussion that changes frequently. The general principle is that you never want to cut your film too closely to the beat of the track. Doing so will always result in a final product that feels like a music video. While not all music videos necessarily cut to the beat for every shot, many of them are cut in this way. And the moment that you start cutting your visuals too closely to the track it will start to feel like a music video.There’s nothing wrong with editing a really important moment or shot to a big change in your music cue, but just don’t do it for every cue. Doing it once or twice in a sequence can work well, but doing it on every cut will start to feel redundant in most cases. Editing to the beat is tempting, but sometimes when you place your edit points just a few frames before or after the change in the song, it can evoke an even more powerful and organic viewing experience.Know where to mix down your music.Probably the most common music related issue that I see in indie films, is that the cues are so poorly mixed. One of the unforeseen challenges associated with cutting your film to pre-existing music is that you may end up doing a lot (if not all) of the post audio work yourself, and you may not inherently know how and where to mix your music cues. Often times, musically driven moments in independent films can feel lifeless as a result of the mix not reacting to changes in the edit.For example, there might be a 2 or 3 shot montage that bridges together two scenes (and the same music cue is covering both scenes), but the cue may not be brought up during that small break. This subtle, yet important oversight will immediately detach the viewer from the scene as they are expecting the music to really kick into full gear at that point.The same issue can arise when a music cue isn’t brought down enough during a dialogue scene and the actors voices start getting drowned out. I’m always surprised at how many filmmakers just want to drop a track into their edit and find an ‘average point’ where the music sort of works, without mixing it up and down. This will always result in a final product that feels somewhat unfinished, so no matter what make sure that you level off your cues smoothly and purposefully so they work in tandem with your visuals.Avoid wall to wall music.Another music related problem that affects short and feature length films alike, is the overuse of music. There are certain types of films that can benefit from having a score run through the entire film, but in the vast majority of cases doing this can make the project feel like a really long music video. Like any other editorial tool that you have access to in the editing room, music needs to be used tastefully so that the film doesn’t become monotonous or over synthesized.In my opinion, many films that have fundamental problems (whether it be related to the performances, writing, or subject matter), attempt to use music to cover up the issues and distract the viewer from some of the creative and technical issues that may be present. So if you’re in a situation where you are tempted to use music cues in every last scene of your film, I would suggest taking a step back and really asking yourself why you feel that’s necessary. Be very careful that it truly is the best choice for your story.last_img read more

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Opinion Michigans resurgence a blessing for Ohio State college football

Then sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) carries the ball during a game against Michigan on Nov. 29 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 42-28. Credit: Lantern File PhotoSince the turn of the century, Michigan has been to five BCS Bowls. The Wolverines won two: a three-point victory in the Sugar Bowl over Virginia Tech in 2012 and a one-point victory over Alabama in the 2000 Orange Bowl. However, their Rose Bowl performances have been utter disappointments. Additionally, they have yet to participate in the Big Ten Championship Game.Since 1950, Michigan has captured one national championship; Ohio State has won seven.Since the turn of the century, Purdue’s four wins over OSU are more than Michigan’s three.Simply put, Michigan football has been marred in recent decades by coaching instability, poor quarterback play and an inability to win The Game.Having said this, the question as to the annual significance of the OSU-Michigan game must be raised. Seemingly, rivalries like the Auburn-Alabama, OSU-Michigan State, LSU-Alabama and Oregon-Stanford have overshadowed The Game due to recent dominance by the men in scarlet and gray. In fact, in most of our lifetimes, only one game between the two comes to mind as meaningful; a clash of the titans, per se. That one game, however, epitomizes the importance of The Game, as I can recall every little detail despite having been just a little 9-year-old Buckeye without a master’s degree in OSU fandom.The game of the centuryIt was a pleasant fall afternoon in Hudson, Ohio. Autumn leaves fell from high above as the sun departed from the clear blue sky. Inside our neighbor’s house, our family and friends reminisced over school systems, neighborhood drama and our crazy families. Meanwhile, two hours south down I-71, the same could not be stated. College GameDay set up shop on the OSU campus to promote the heavyweight title fight between the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in the nation. When Lee Corso donned the Michigan helmet in front of thousands of Buckeyes, he was met with ruthless replies to the likes of, “Corso sucks!”Regardless, this game clearly had a special place in the rivalry’s history, as to this day it remains the only installment of The Game to ever kick off at 3:30 p.m. in ESPN/ABC’s primetime window. The town was buzzing. The hype was tremendous. Ohio Stadium was bursting with excitement. And the Big Ten was ready to put one of its two signature programs in the national championship game.Dubbed “The Game of the Century” as kickoff became imminent, conversation back in Hudson swayed to BCS projections, to quarterbacks Troy Smith vs. Chad Henne and to the duel between two coaching greats, Jim Tressel and Lloyd Carr. Finally, OSU won the coin toss, deferred to the second half, and Michigan prepared to receive the opening kickoff in what would go down as one of the greatest college football games not only in the OSU-Michigan rivalry, but of all time.After trading touchdowns on their opening possessions, both teams followed by exchanging punts. In the beginning of the second quarter, the Buckeyes took their first lead behind a Beanie Wells 52-yard touchdown run. Add on two Smith touchdown throws — one to Ted Ginn Jr. and the other to Anthony Gonzalez — offset by one Michigan touchdown, and OSU would take a two-touchdown lead into the second half.The ‘Shoe was hopping. The family room in which I watched the game was buzzing with excitement and anticipation. I realized that the Buckeyes were just two quarters of solid football from the national championship game.Unfortunately, no football game comes without adversity. OSU would learn that the hard way.In the blink of an eye, the Scarlet and Gray went three-and-out, conceded a touchdown and compounded the mistakes with a pivotal interception captured by Michigan defensive lineman Alan Branch.Great teams, however, overcome adversity and respond stronger.The Buckeyes proceeded to stymie the Michigan offense and held it to just a field goal, and they soon after responded with a touchdown of their own. All of a sudden it was a two-score game. All of a sudden the dream of two national championships in a four-year span was unfolding before my very eyes.After a couple of series of mistake-filled football, Michigan started the fourth quarter in the red zone, down 11. Running back Mike Hart scored two plays later, cutting the lead to just four. A Buckeye fumble followed, but Michigan could not capitalize.OSU would then not miss this opportunity to close the game out for good. An 11-play, 83-yard, season-defining drive ensued, punctuated by Brian Robiskie’s 13-yard touchdown grab.With just over five minutes remaining, it seemed as if OSU had its plane ticket to Glendale, Arizona, booked, but Michigan, once again, as great teams do, fought back.A clutch 11-play, 81-yard drive capped off by Tyler Ecker’s 16-yard touchdown reception and a two-point conversion brought the Wolverines to within three. An onside kick could reverse the course of college football history.But it wasn’t meant to be that day for the Maize and Blue. Ginn secured the onside kick, the victory and a date with Florida in the championship game.Pandemonium infiltrated the exit stairways of Ohio Stadium and followed students and alumni alike to the High Street bars and to drives up and down I-71 home. This was a classic OSU-Michigan game, magnificent in quality of play and implications. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same about many of the games played recently.A new eraEven with the advent of the College Football Playoff and the resurrection of the Wolverines, it is naive to expect every clash in the next decade to become a de facto qualifier for the Big Ten Championship Game, and thereby the playoff. It is way too early to elevate Jim Harbaugh vs. Urban Meyer to the status of Woody Hayes vs. Bo Schembechler and to associate any upcoming OSU-Michigan game with the great ones from the “10 year war.”However, with Michigan beginning to supplant itself as an annual contender, this rivalry that has seemingly lost a bit of its luster should and will revive its tension. And no college football fan can deny that an intriguing and relevant OSU-Michigan game is the greatest game on turf.I’m not asking for every Buckeye-Wolverine showdown to match the classic that was the 2006 clash; just every once in awhile it would be appreciated that the two of the most historic programs in college football provide a game that is worthy of the national spotlight it inevitably attracts.I’m not asking for every Buckeye-Wolverine clash to be a No. 1 vs. No. 2 clash of the titans. Sometimes, in fact, it adds to the rivalry when one team has the opportunity to undermine the rival’s playoff aspirations even amidst a disappointing season.But, thinking about the potential of the OSU-Michigan game turning into the must-see game every year is tantalizing. What if someday, the Buckeyes and Wolverines somehow met for the national championship? It’s definitely not impossible given the precedent the CFP committee has set on schedule strength, margin of victory and quality of loss.It would be tough to deny a one-loss OSU team that traveled to Ann Arbor, Michigan, as the No. 2 team preparing to face undefeated and No. 1 Michigan. And this scenario is coming sooner rather than later, especially with the recruiting standards Meyer and Harbaugh are currently setting.Gone are the days of Michigan being worse than Purdue. Home are the days of Michigan being the archenemy it was destined to be. And I can’t wait. Nor can the world of college football. read more

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Ohio State womens track and field competes the Wright way

Ohio State sprinter and hurdler Letecia Wright led the OSU women’s track and field team to its first-ever outdoor championship title last weekend. “We wanted to show everyone that Ohio State women’s track team was not going to just be an over-the-night, one-time winning team,” Wright said. “We wanted to show people exactly how my coach and the team have changed the culture.” Less than three months ago, on Feb. 27, Wright helped the team clinch its first indoor Big Ten championship. When Wright arrived at OSU, the team finished 10th in the conference in the indoor season and fifth in the conference in the outdoor season. On top of helping to overcome the team’s struggles, Wright needed to grow personally. “I definitely had to grow mentally strong,” Wright said. “I knew sports were vigorous, but not to the level of college. … There are 20 of you who can do one race great — now who’s stronger mentally?” With a strenuous workout regimen and a strict diet, Wright faced a daunting lifestyle as an athlete at OSU. As she always had done when times were hard, Wright turned to her mother and sister. “They’ve always supported me in anything I do,” Wright said. “The days I’m a little upset about how I ran or how I’ve practiced landing, they’ve been there to listen to me and just tell me, you know, it gets better, just keep focus and know why you’re there.” Besides her family, Wright relied on support from her high school coach and many other people from her hometown of Baltimore, who helped guide her to her current level of success. “When I got into college, they all still root me on,” she said. “Every week, they tell me they’re proud of me. … They’ve been there.” Wright has taken the entire experience in stride. In her time at OSU, Wright has won two individual Big Ten titles as a member of the 4×100 meter relay team, set the 100 meter hurdles record at the Drake Relays and was selected All-Big Ten six times. But Wright is humble; she’d rather deflect the spotlight onto her teammates. “I’ve been successful as an individual because of the team,” Wright said. “We are surrounded by a lot of girls who want to do good and are motivated.” Wright’s love for her teammates doesn’t go unnoticed by those around her. “Tish is very humble,” said Christina Manning, a junior teammate. “Our coach spoke on that right before the day of finals and she pointed out how it seems as though Tish doesn’t know how good she is. … She doesn’t care so much about winning, but more about the team.” Wright even gives a lot of credit to all of her competitors. The better the competitors do, Wright said, the better she performs. Her positive attitude, especially with her opponents, sometimes can get her into trouble. “Sometimes my coach says I’m a little too nice in the field,” she said. Coach Karen Dennis said she knows how rare of an athlete Wright is, both as a competitor and as a person. Although Dennis appreciates Wright’s humility, she said, she wouldn’t mind seeing Wright take charge. “Sometimes I wish Letecia were a little more selfish,” Dennis said. It’s Wright’s optimism in the toughest of situations that makes her who she is. She knows the grueling workouts and the tireless effort she has put forth have helped her rise to the top of the Big Ten. But it’s not the Big Ten titles or the All-Big Ten selections that she wants to define her career at OSU. Instead, it’s the growth she’s shared with her team. “My last four years here have been really great,” Wright said. “I’ve learned a lot of things. It’s just excellent to watch the whole team change and become a stronger team.” Dennis said she likes to think of Letecia as a role player on a basketball team. She’s the special kind of athlete who not only puts up big numbers but also inspires those around her to compete at a higher level. “Great players make people around them better,” Dennis said. “She is a great athlete and she has made everybody around her better.” An earlier version of this story incorrectly spelled Letecia Wright. Correction: May 18, 2011 read more

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We need few changes Sarri

first_imgMaurizio Sarri needs one or two changes to have Chelsea playing in his own way, according to Goal.Sarri believes the team will be able to follow his footballing philosophy and style of play after a few changes have been made.The newly appointed Chelsea manager has revealed his excitement about the upcoming season and he can’t wait to go toe to toe with some of the best coaches in the game.Chelsea announced Sarri as manager on Saturday after former boss Antonio Conte was relieved of his duties on Friday.The 59-year-old has already signed Jorginho from former club Napoli as he looks to bolster his squad for the upcoming challenge.Chelsea are also believed to be closing in on the signing of Russian midfielder Aleksandr Golovin from CSKA Moscow.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.“I think we’re a good team, the problem is there are five to six good teams in the Premier League.” An excited Sarri told Chelsea TV.“With one or two adjustments, I think we’ll be able to play my kind of football.”Maurizio Sarri also spoke about current City boss Pep Guardiola who’s a keen admirer of the Italian gaffer.“Guardiola is a friend of mine, I’m grateful he has spoken of me in Night regard,” Sarri said.Sarri was also quick to praise new signing Jorginho who under his tutelage at Napoli became one of the very best passing midfielders in Europe.“He’s a very technical player, his mind is very quick as well,” said Sarri.last_img read more

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