Aussie Women’s Work their Magic

first_img@Eden_RichardsThe Australian Women’s Open side has put on a clinical performance to defeat New Zealand 10-3 at Sunshine Coast Stadium on Friday night.Aussie Tamika Upton stole the show, constantly bamboozling the Kiwi defence to score a hat-trick of touchdowns in an excellent individual effort.Doubles to Danielle Davis and Laura Peattie provided great support for Upton, with a six-touchdown to one second half seeing Australia seal victory.The Aussies led from start to finish and are now 1-0 up in the best of three Trans Tasman Series. After a scoreless first 5 minutes it was Australia who broke the deadlock, with Rachelle Davis latching onto a beautiful ball from sister Danielle Davis to make the score 1-0 in the 6th minute.New Zealand hit back straight away, tying the score at 1-1 courtesy of some fancy footwork from Mahina Paul in the 7th minute.Danielle Davis continued her strong start to the match, dummying and scoring in the 10th minute to give her Australia a 2-1 lead at the halfway point of the first half.The Aussies extended their lead in the 14th minute, with Ashleigh Kearney using her speed to beat two Kiwi defenders in the centre of the park.A wonderful cut-out ball from New Zealander Tara Mohi found Kate Day in the 18th minute and she crossed on the left wing to keep the Kiwis in touch at 3-2.But Australia hit back seconds later, with a slick sequence of team passing putting Upton over to give the side a 4-2 lead.This is how it stayed to finish the first half and Australia made the perfect start to the second stanza, scoring within the first minute of play through Samantha Rodgers.The lead then grew to four touchdowns in the 22nd minute, with Danielle Davis scoring her second to put Australia up 6-2. New Zealand found themselves in real trouble in the 26th minute as Peattie crossed for the first of her two touchdowns to make it 7-2.Upton then stole the show for Australia, making a 60m break to score a great individual touchdown that all but sealed the match for the Aussies halfway through the second half.That 8-2 lead soon became 9-2, with Upton grabbing her third touchdown with seven minutes to play.New Zealand managed a consolation touchdown in the 36th minute courtesy of Cassandra Engler, but the damage had already been done as they trailed 9-3.Australia capped off a big win in the 39th minute, with Peattie scoring her second touchdown to make it 10-3 to the Aussies with just over a minute to play.That’s how the scoreline stayed in what was a dominant display from AustraliaThe Aussies now have all the momentum heading into Day Two as they look to seal the Women’s Open Series with a game to spare.Australia 10 (Upton 3, D. Davis 2, Peattie 2, R. Davis, Kearney, Rodgers touchdowns) defeated New Zealand 3 (Engler, Day, Paul touchdowns)Related LinksWomen’s Work Their Magiclast_img read more

Read More →

5 Bold Predictions For The South Region Of The NCAA Tournament

first_imgFive bold predictions for the South Region. Miami Plug DanceTwitter/@MiamiHurricanesThe 2016 NCAA Tournament gets underway tonight with the first pair of play-in games. Play in the South Region begins at 9:10 p.m. ET on tru TV, with two 11-seeds, Wichita State and Vanderbilt, facing off for the right to play Vanderbilt. The South Region is very intriguing. It contains the No. 1 overall seed in the field, along with a number of teams capable of busting the bracket. We’ll find out which team emerges on March 26 at the KFC YUM! Center in Louisville.We’re here to help you make your picks in the South, but we’re not going with just chalk. Without further ado, let’s look at our five bold predictions for the South Region. Get Started: Wichita State “Shocks” The Competition >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6last_img read more

Read More →

Defense might be Ohio States blueprint for success

Trey Burke couldn’t help but smile. Michigan’s sophomore point guard had just hit a leaning, double-clutched 3-pointer that banked off the backboard and through the net. It was, perhaps, the toughest shot Burke had taken all game, and he made it. After a contest full of ill-fated attempts, something had finally fallen for the Wolverines’ Player of the Year candidate, and it brought a sense of sarcastic joy to the face of the Columbus native. The shot was irrelevant in the game’s final outcome. It came with one second left and Michigan down six. It wasn’t the shot that Burke, or the Wolverines, needed. That shot had come 15 seconds prior, with Michigan down two, and the ball in the hands of its sophomore playmaker. Burke, going one-on-one against Aaron Craft, took a step-back three over the Ohio State junior guard’s outstretched arms. It went in and out, and with it, so did the Wolverines’ chances of beating the Buckeyes. Playing in front of about 25 friends and family members clad in Maize and Blue No. 3 jerseys, Burke struggled. The former Buckeye fan and current best friend of former OSU star Jared Sullinger went 4-13 from the field, his worst shooting performance of the season. Burke wasn’t the only Wolverine that had little success in their 56-53 loss to the Buckeyes on Sunday, though. Michigan (16-1, 3-1 Big Ten) shot 38 percent as a team. OSU (13-3, 3-1 Big Ten) held the Wolverines’ big four of Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr., Nik Stauskas, and Glenn Robinson III to 35 points, 24 less than their season average. “Ohio State has a really, really good defensive team. Really good,” said Michigan coach John Beilein. “You’re watching a team that plays defense, buys into it and has very skilled defenders on the perimeter.” The Buckeyes, led by Craft, were physical with the Wolverines from the get-go. Burke opened the game with a three, but the Wolverines proceeded to go scoreless for the next seven minutes, eventually falling in a 29-8 hole. “They did beat us up a little bit,” Hardaway Jr., a junior guard, said. Michigan relies heavily on its underclassmen, with two freshmen – Stauskas and Robinson – in its starting five. Those players, Stauskas especially, were noticeably irritated by OSU’s in-your-face, deny-the-ball style of play. Stauskas, a 6-foot-6 sharpshooting guard from Canada, was held scoreless for the first time this season. After being sent to the bench midway through the first half, Stauskas couldn’t contain his anger as he yelled four-letter words not able to be repeated. “They were denying (Stauskas), so we just had to continue to play. When we got (the ball) in the paint, they wasn’t leaving him,” Burke said. “I just told him to ‘keep getting good looks, I’m going to find you, we’re all going to find you.’ Ohio State was taking him away on the perimeter.” For OSU, they need not look any further than Sunday’s game as a blueprint on how to be successful the rest of the season. Having lost their first three games against ranked opponents (Duke, Kansas, Illinois), the Buckeyes notched their first big win of the year Sunday. The Buckeyes handed Michigan its first loss of the season – thereby denying the Wolverines of their first No. 1 ranking in 21 years – and they did it with their defense. Sure, OSU shot the ball well in the first half and at one point had a shooting percentage of nearly 70 percent. But that likely won’t happen very many times again this season, if at all, as the Buckeyes proved by regressing to a 44 percent output by the end of the game. What they can rely on is their defense. It’s what makes them great, Beilein said. “This team, and (OSU coach Thad Matta’s) teams, have always been this way … the perimeter defense in particular is exceptional. Why? They’ve been doing the same shell drills for two, three, four years. They really work at this and they’re really good at it,” Beilein said emphatically. Against the Wolverines, nearly every Buckeye was solid, some playing spectacularly. Craft held Burke, a probable first-team all-American with a skill set analysts have compared to NBA great Chris Paul, to his worst outing of the season. “Craft is one of the best defenders. You have to give him credit. I love playing against him because he makes me better and he makes me work,” Burke said. “Craft is as good as there is, as I’ve ever seen. He’s tremendous,” Beilein said. OSU sophomore guard Shannon Scott blocked a Burke layup in transition, sending the sold-out Schottenstein Center crowd into a vibrating roar. Senior forward Evan Ravenel and sophomore center Amir Williams limited the Wolverines’ big men to 13 points. Even junior forward Deshaun Thomas, called “Shaun” at times last year by Matta because he “played no D,” stepped up. “I thought Deshaun played harder on defense tonight than he ever had. That is the type of defensive play we need from him to be a successful team,” Matta said. To continue to be successful, OSU, admittedly, needs to have the type of energy and effort it brought into Sunday’s contest every game. Beilein said he doesn’t think that will be a problem. “Thad’s a great defensive coach and they’ve got great defenders, that’s a great combination,” he said. OSU, ranked No. 11 in the most recent Associated Press poll, next travels to Michigan State to take on the No. 18 Spartans at 6 p.m. Saturday. Michigan is now ranked No. 5 by the AP. Lousville took hold of the No. 1 ranking. read more

Read More →

Stalagmite study offers clues about Earths past magnetic polarity shifts

first_img The geomagnetic field shields Earth from the direct impact of solar wind and cosmic radiation. Credit: PNAS © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Stalagmites in southern China preserve detailed geomagnetic oscillations and centennial geomagnetic reversal events. Credit: PNAS Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences A large team of researchers from China, Taiwan and Australia has found evidence of faster-than-expected shifts in Earth’s magnetic polarity several thousand years ago. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of stalagmites found in a cave in China and what they found. More information: * Yu-Min Chou et al. Multidecadally resolved polarity oscillations during a geomagnetic excursion, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1720404115AbstractPolarity reversals of the geomagnetic field have occurred through billions of years of Earth history and were first revealed in the early 20th century. Almost a century later, details of transitional field behavior during geomagnetic reversals and excursions remain poorly known. Here, we present a multidecadally resolved geomagnetic excursion record from a radioisotopically dated Chinese stalagmite at 107–91 thousand years before present with age precision of several decades. The duration of geomagnetic directional oscillations ranged from several centuries at 106–103 thousand years before present to millennia at 98–92 thousand years before present, with one abrupt reversal transition occurring in one to two centuries when the field was weakest. These features indicate prolonged geodynamo instability. Repeated asymmetrical interhemispheric polarity drifts associated with weak dipole fields likely originated in Earth’s deep interior. If such rapid polarity changes occurred in future, they could severely affect satellites and human society.* Press release Explore further Earth’s magnetic field is not about to reverse, study finds Citation: Stalagmite study offers clues about Earth’s past magnetic polarity shifts (2018, August 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-stalagmite-clues-earth-magnetic-polarity.html Prior research has shown that the Earth’s magnetic field sometimes reverses polarity—such an event has been experienced only once by modern humans, but that was long before the age of satellites and electronics. In the modern age, such a reversal could spell trouble for many devices that we have come to rely on. For that reason, scientists study past reversals in the hope of predicting when the next might occur. In this new effort, the researchers traveled to the Sanxing Cave in Guizhou Province in southern China. There, they obtained samples of stalagmites (columns of calcium salts that rise from the floor of caves, caused by dripping water), which hold evidence of changes to the magnetic field going back thousands of years.The Earth’s magnetic field is generated by liquid metal churning at depths 1,700 miles below the surface. But sometimes, that churning can change slightly, affecting the magnetic field. Prior research has suggested that a full reversal would likely take thousands of years, but this new research suggests it can happen in as few as 100.The researchers report that the stalagmite sample taken from the cave showed evidence of magnetic field changes from 107,000 to 91,000 years ago—a span of 16,000 years. By studying the sample very precisely using a high-resolution cryogenic magnetometer, the researchers were able to trace changes in the magnetic field more precisely than has ever been done before. In so doing, they discovered that approximately 98,000 years ago, a magnetic reversal occurred over just a century and a half, approximately 10 times faster than had been believed possible. The researchers found several other phase changes, as well, with various degrees of fluctuation strength. They also found that when the magnetic field was weaker than normal, more fluctuations in strength occurred. They suggest such fluctuations likely caused some instability in convection in the planet’s outer core.last_img read more

Read More →

Software technology that simulates LED devices for rapid development of light sources

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A Purdue-affiliated company is developing a new time and cost effective software technology that could offer a more efficient and realistic way to model and simulate light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to achieve more powerful and more efficient LED light sources often used in general lighting, automobile lighting and consumer electronics. Startup commercializes MRI device that could enhance medical diagnostics Explore further Provided by Purdue University It is very difficult for designers in academia and industry to gain a deeper understanding of LED processes to guide design improvements, Kubis added.”LED devices are small and expensive to make. It’s not feasible to make a hundreds of these devices without checking for improvements, because the physics involved is very non-linear and very complicated,” he said. “If a change in the device’s structure allows it to perform better, you can’t just keep implementing that change and expect it to keep advancing the device. This insight into the physics component can really help guide and advise design improvements.”Technology used by LEDcentral is licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. The company is a member of the Purdue Startup Class of 2017. LEDcentral’s software is being used in existing code.”Our technology has been implemented into an existing software and is currently being utilized. Our method is really efficient and our results have shown that we are very close to the experimental data, closer than any other method developed so far,” Kubis said. “We’ve received very positive feedback so far and found that after receiving real device data that our modelling data was in almost perfect agreement.”Overall, the software could greatly influence the environmental impact LED lights have, Kubis added.”If we can, with little effort, replace all these inefficient light bulbs, the energy waste could be cut tremendously,” he said. “There’s a huge environmental aspect to what our technology could do.”LEDcentral plans to release its product in the near future.”Right now our technology is only available to those using a specific platform which has been commercialized by another company. For public release we’ve been using nanoHUB quite extensively as it offers online training, seminars, papers, textbooks, presentations and online tools,” Kubis said. “Our technology will be part of a tool in a simplified version. This would support our business but also allow students and classes to benefit from it. Within the year it should be available.” Citation: Software technology that simulates LED devices for rapid development of light sources (2018, March 29) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-software-technology-simulates-devices-rapid.html Tillmann Kubis, a research assistant professor, and Gerhard Klimeck, a professor, both in Purdue’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in Purdue’s Network for Computational Nanotechnology and Purdue’s Center for Predictive Materials and Devices, along with Junzhe Geng, a graduate student in Klimeck’s nanoelectronic modeling group, co-founded the company LEDcentral LLC to commercialize the technology.LEDcentral’s goal is to improve the design of LEDs efficiency and output power.”The most efficient LED light bulb on the market right now has a rather dim output, so what we are trying to do is develop a way to have high output power and still achieve high efficiency. Right now that is not possible because of what is called the efficiency droop. It’s not fully understood where the droop comes from or how to solve it, so that’s where our software model comes into play,” Kubis said. “Currently, we’re specifically interested in blue LED lights, which are the basis for white light bulbs. We aim for our models to help industry develop more powerful and more efficient LED technology.”LEDcentral’s modeling software could save both time and money in the development process.”Instead of fabricating hundreds of devices, you can simulate thousands of them, and then pick the best 10 you actually care about,” Kubis said. “Additionally, if you have experimental data that you don’t fully understand, we can explain why the behavior is observed. We are able to explain experiments that have happened and predict experiments that have not. Users can run our technology on a local computer and we also have user interfaces so that it’s easy to use for a person who isn’t trained in the software.”Kubis said conventional models may be insufficient and expensive.”The models existing in industry and academia are based on classical approaches where electrons are considered particles; however, their behavior should be studied on a multiscale paradigm, i.e. atomistic resolution on a micrometer length scale,” he said. “Models on the nanometer scale do a fairly good job, but important LED properties are missing. Additionally, the attempts to model the physics on a quantum level are usually very expensive. The quantum mechanics are captured and the small scale is fully covered, but these attempts are not very efficient.” read more

Read More →