Warriors 130, Lakers 111: Inside Klay Thompson’s NBA-record shooting night

first_imgLOS ANGELES –– The shot felt good when it left Klay Thompson’s fingertips. Unsurprisingly, one of many Thompson’s 3-pointers went into the basket. Afterwards, Thompson pointed to boxer Floyd Mayweather at his courtside seat and flashed the money sign.The symbolism spoke for itself with the Warriors cruising to a 130-111 victory over the Lakers on Monday. Thompson finished with 44 points while shooting 17-of-20 from the field and 10-of-11 from 3. He became the first player in NBA history to …last_img read more

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Nitrogen concerns for Ohio?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Over the past month or so, I participated in three conferences on nutrient loss. While many speakers addressed phosphorus concerns, several mentioned nitrogen as the next target. I focused on the nitrogen talks.So lets talk about nitrogen management. It leaks, like everywhere. Up and down — up as a gas when the soils are saturated and moves down and out with water movement. By my estimate we mineralized 100 pounds of N per acre in 2017, and probably lost 100 pounds or more in many spots to leaching and to denitrification. Even though 80% of the atmosphere is N, we still have to supply it for our grass crops. And we add more than we need, because we don’t want to be short. That’s an economic concern. So what can we do about managing nitrogen?The current tool to make nitrogen recommendations for corn in Ohio is the CNR, which stands for Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator. The tool is housed at Iowa State University and includes our Ohio data in the model: http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu. The model includes the neighboring states of Indiana and Michigan. A total of seven states are involved in the tool.How do you determine your N rate for your crop? The old rule of thumb was 1.2 pounds of N for every bushel of your yield goal. So in the old days for 200-bushel per acre corn, apply 240 units of N. But genetics, economics and environmental concerns have changed that thinking. And we have learned that yield goal is not a factor in setting your N rate. Let me repeat that: Yield Goal is Not a Factor in Setting the N Rate. It comes down to site and weather. And it is very possible that the lowest yielding field on your farm requires the most nitrogen.Economic based nitrogen calculators have been around since about 2005, they are used to calculate the economic optimum rate of nitrogen. In the recent past with high nitrogen prices and low corn prices, we were looking for the minimum rate to maximize economic yield. Then we went through the high grain prices of 2008 to 2014 and no one worried as much about the economic concerns. Today is different, again.I made a run on the CNRC with my numbers for next spring — corn at $3.50, N priced at $0.35 per unit N, in Ohio, in a corn/soybean rotation. Our most profitable recommended rate of N would be 175 pounds, with a profitable range from 158 to 191. The “profitable range” is within $1 per acre of the recommended rate. These numbers will change slightly as we add more data to the system from recent nitrogen rate trials. Keep checking back. Why don’t I throw in a factor for the site and weather?  That is somewhat covered by selecting Ohio as the state — that will get you to average soils, rainfall, and growing conditions. But because we don’t have enough information from the past to calculate the future, that means you may have to look for a way to incorporate “this” growing season into a nitrogen rate calculation.Do try out the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator on you own, with your prices. It is at http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu. And perhaps think about how to most efficiently use that rate of nitrogen. What practices can you use to keep N where you put it, and keep it for crop needs?What is the right source — NH3 vs. 28% or urea, manure?N is basically the same, generally it goes into the crop as a nitrate. Do make use of the N in manure — maybe do a PSNT to see what is available. And depending on placement and timing, a stabilizer may be necessary for some sources.Right rate — use an N rate calculator?Use the CNRC. Or there are some other models out there, still a lot to learn with these but their goal is to take in-season information into account when selecting the right rate.Right time — as close to the time for crop needs as possible?Corn needs little nitrogen early in the season, but by V8, V10 or so there is rapid uptake. Perhaps apply 40 to 60 units of N at planting then delay the remainder until V8. Or apply 100 N with anhydrous ammonia pre-plant then use a crop sensor at V8 to determine the needs for the rest of the season. If you use this method it is really useful to have a N-rich strip to compare. It will also be useful to have a zero rate strip to determine what your soil/field is capable of mineralizing. Right place — next to the row, incorporated?Definitely get N into the soil. If we are dry and the nitrogen is on the surface, then it may not get to the crop as quickly as needed but from work I saw from this past summer in western states, this rarely happens. Does N need to be next to the row? Not really, we have enough rain and soil moisture in Ohio that we can put it between the rows and the roots will get to the N.last_img read more

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Resource Discovery: Children’s Books Relating to LGBT Families

first_imgBy Robyn DiPietro-Wells, Heather Johnson, and Misty KrippelChildren’s Books by AnnieSpratt, CC0, Available at pixabay.comRecently the Family Development team presented two webinars surrounding LGBT families:The ABCs of LGBT:  Learning Language and Inclusive Practices in Work with LGBT FamiliesTRANSforming Conversations:  Addressing Needs of Transgender Youth and Their FamiliesAs a follow up to this, the Early Intervention team wanted to provide practitioners with a list of children’s books on the topic.  You can find the list HERE which includes book descriptions, recommended age ranges, and even a link to a recording of the book being read aloud when available.We also created something called a book nook for one of the recommended books, Stella Brings the Family.  A book nook is a simple guide providing “hands-on ways to embed social emotional skill building activities into everyday routines.”  The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) has many other book nooks available here.  The book nook we created for Stella Brings the Family can be found HERE.last_img read more

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Jim Keenan on What Is Not Taught – Episode 46

first_imgTweets you can use to share this episodeThere’s nothing wrong with a left turn and a right turn ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetYou just have to be deliberate in what you do ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 22:18 — 20.5MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSToday we hear about what we are not being taught to be successful, from Jim Keenan. Jim’s new book, Not Taught, represents a journey of discovery in how giving gives back, even when you are not expecting it. The story of the book began when Jim was asked to give a speech to graduates about what they really needed to know going forward. The speech funneled into a blog post, which stuck with Jim. He then turned it into an ebook, did more research, added to it, and eventually became the published version it is today. So what is it that graduates these days need to know? What are we not being taught? Jim says that our parent’s generation believed one way: get a good job and work there forever. That has all changed. The world these students are entering is playing by different rules that their parents could not have prepared them for. Tune in for the education you may have missed, on today’s episode of In the Arena. There’s never been such a good time to be successful ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetThe time is now to get paid to thinkDuring the industrial age, a boss would have scoffed at the idea of paying someone to think. That mindset was a joke. No one approached their boss with ideas, instead everyone had their place and expectations. Today, Jim Keenan says companies are desperate for thinking people. It is all about creatively solving problems. There are no longer steps to follow, roles to assume, and one way to operate. The old industrial age mindset is a disadvantage when entering today’s market. Big companies lay employees off when the economy shifts and are no longer a long-term reliable basket to put any of your eggs in. Jim wants to prepare you for the information age, which creates room for thinking and for ideas to matter. Find out today if you are really embracing the change this age is bringing, with Jim Keenan as he shares insights from his book, “Not Taught.”What is your reach?“Reach” and “brand” are two buzzwords Jim Keenan wants you to be able to define for yourself. Your reach is the ability for people to find you. Do you have a LinkedIn profile? Is it current and complete? Without utilizing tools like this, you are inhibiting your own chances of being noticed, known, and ultimately hired. The importance of reach really comes down to how many people can you influence? How can you move your message through people and get them talking about it. Reach is not a new idea, it has always been important, but why? People pay for reach. If you can connect yourself to people, and people to people, you can move whatever you want through those groups, and they will react. Listen in to start discovering your own reach.Expect the shifts ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetNot Taught: It’s branding season The next thing Jim Keenan advises to be thinking about is your brand. Who are you and what do you want to be known for? There is often a lack of trust in oneself to figure out a brand and work on it. Many people find themselves stuck between thinking it is too late to start working on their brand and waiting for approval to develop one. Having a brand creates massive value. One perspective Jim speaks to is the younger millennials mixed up in the industrial age mindset and influence of their parents, with no green light motivation to move forward. Jim calls you forward into asking where it is you want to go and how to start moving that direction. It is time to embrace your brand. Shifting out of autopilotThe first step you take creates something necessary: movement. If you find yourself stuck on autopilot, you need to make a move. Yes, you will be forced to ask questions for yourself and shift your brand. Jim Keenan does not want you to hold yourself back, or worse, be boring. Is fear holding you back? Fear of how people will react to you? A lot of people think they are okay if they are not getting negative reactions. But what if you embraced the struggle and stopped to think about what you really want to be good at and known for? Many adults are completely rooted in the 20th century, but attempting to live in this century. And a lot of these people, as long as they don’t screw up, will be fine. But that is autopilot. Get ready to shift gears on this episode of In the Arena. You’re boring because you’re afraid of how people will react to you ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Introduction of today’s guest, Jim Keenan. What compelled Jim to write Not Taught. The different age we are now living in. The new message for today’s emerging graduates. Dissecting the term “reach.” Dissecting the term “brand” for both youth and adults. The fear involved in “figuring it all out”. Jim’s own journey. Diving into the chapter entitled, “Don’t Be Boring.” Addressing a listener’s email and affirming Jim’s book. The most exciting part of Jim’s new book.Our Sponsors:2 Free Week Trial of Cirrus InsightsResources & Links mentioned in this episodeJim’s website:  A Sales GuyJim Keenan’s book0692520767 The theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

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India vs Sri Lanka World Cup final: Gambhir, Kohli up the tempo against Lanka

first_imgChasing 275, India are 86/2 in 16 overs with Gautam Gambhir and Virat Kohli at the crease against Sri Lanka in the World Cup final at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai. Live score | Latest match photos There was major disappointment in sort for the Indian fans as Lasith Malinga claimed Virender Sehwag on the second ball of the India innings trapping him leg-before.Post that wicket, Sachin Tendulkar and Gautam Gambhir were trying to revive the innings and they were doing it at a good rate scoring in boundaries. But, as they say good things don’t last long and their partnership too ended early and again the man in question was Malinga. Tendulkar went for a cut but ended up giving an edge to keeper Sangakkara with 32/2 on board. He scored 18.Sri Lanka innings Mahela Jayawardene scored a ton as Sri Lanka put 274/6 in 50 overs against India in the World Cup final at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai on Saturday. Upul Tharanga and Tillakaratne Dilshan started of cautiously as India seamers S Sreesanth and Zaheer Khan got busy trying to keep a good line after Sri Lanka won the toss.Soon Zaheer got the man he wanted claiming opener Upul Tharanga on the first ball of the seventh over. The ball took the edge of Tharanga’s bat and Virender Sehwag took a fine catch in the first slip. Sri Lanka score at the stage 17/1.In the 17th over Harbhajan Singh accounted for the other opener Tillakaratne Dilshan with his turner. It was a soft dismissal that took away the batsman’s leg stump when he was trying to sweep the ball down the leg side. He fell for 33 and Lanka fell to 60/2.advertisementPost that wicket, captain Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jayawardene started off slowly dealing in singles but gradually upped the tempo. The duo had put 62 runs for the third wicket, when Yuvraj Singh got the man India wanted. An edge of Sangakkara’s bat was lapped up by skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni behind the stumps on 48 and Sri Lanka went down to 122/3 in the 28th over.Yuvraj Singh could have got another wicket in the form of Thilan Samaraweera, but the replays showed that ball had not touched the batsman’s gloves or the bat before landing in skipper Dhoni’s gloves. Soon Mahela Jayawardene and left-hand batsman Tilhan Samaraweera got on with a partnership. But as has been the case in this match whenever two batsmen got going Yuvraj got the breakthrough. Here too when the duo had put 57 runs for the fourth wicket Yuvraj Singh claimed Samaraweera on 21 with an LBW written against his name.  Sri Lanka were 179/4 at the stage.There was more to come as Zaheer Khan struck back and removed new man Chamara Kapugedera with a well disguised slower ball. Kapugedera ended up giving an easy catch to Suresh Raina at mid-wicket and Sri Lanka were reduced to 182/5.Jayawardene went on to complete his century and he did it in good time using just 85 ball to reach there. In the 48th over off Zaheer Khan, he hit consecutive fours to reach the milestone. But Zaheer proved to be a little lucky on the last ball of his over with Nuwan Kulasekara getting run out on 248/6.But, the drama was far from over as new man Thissara Perera plundered him in the last over helping the team put on 274/6. He hit two consecutive fours and then a massive six off the last ball nullified Zaheer Khan’s efforts that had seen him bowl three maiden overs at the start of the innings.In fact, Sri Lanka scored 54 runs in the last five overs – their highest total in Batting Powerplay in this World Cup.TeamsSri Lanka: Tillakaratne Dilshan, Upul Tharanga, Kumar Sangakkara(w/c), Mahela Jayawardene, Thilan Samaraweera, Chamara Kapugedera, Thissara Perera, Nuwan Kulasekara, Suraj Randiv, Lasith Malinga, Muttiah Muralitharan  India: Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Gautam Gambhir, Virat Kohli, Yuvraj Singh, MS Dhoni(w/c), Suresh Raina, Harbhajan Singh, Zaheer Khan, Munaf Patel, S Sreesanthlast_img read more

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Three hockey players from Jharkhand bring pride back to their people, save their school

first_imgGOLDEN GIRLS: (From left) Tete, Surin and Baa flash their medalsThere are always two sides to a coin, many strings in a bow and triumph always has several shades. For a small group of hockey players, it seems like they have seen all sides.From the glare of television camera lights,GOLDEN GIRLS: (From left) Tete, Surin and Baa flash their medalsThere are always two sides to a coin, many strings in a bow and triumph always has several shades. For a small group of hockey players, it seems like they have seen all sides.From the glare of television camera lights and the overpowering attention of an otherwise indifferent world to a place where their alma mater is struggling to survive and life is lived on the margins: the universe continues to whirl for three golden girls from the tribal district of Simdega in Jharkhand.Defender Kanti Baa, 22, and midfielders Sumrai Tete, 21, and Masira Surin, 21, aren’t household names even though they were part of the Indian Commonwealth contingent’s surprise package, the fighting firebrands of its gold medal-winning hockey team.But in their own home they were hailed as symbols of pride and greeted with the enthusiasm usually reserved for the first monsoons over their fathers’ fields. The chief secretary of Jharkhand held a civic reception in honour of the three tribal girls and the treasurer of the grandly named Jharkhand Olympic Association said their success and the rewards that it had brought them would spark off dozens of other careers.Mighty words but what the success of the three gold-medallists did, in the immediate term and in a silently powerful act, was to prevent their hockey school from closing down. When the Commonwealth Games began, the school, the Bariatu Hockey Centre run in the Government Girls High School in the town of the same name, had already received its death sentence, its students ready to pack up and leave.advertisementPart of a group of six National Sports Talent Contest Centres (NSTCC) set up for tribal students in undivided Bihar, the Bariatu school has produced 50 international-level hockey players, including the three in Manchester, but was fighting for its life in the face of lack of funds and poor conditions. Then came gold. The state Government had to reverse the decision and the school is back and running with 27 of the original 29 girls selected to receive training. The story of the Bariatu Hockey Centre is the story of the almost mandatory struggle of the Indian athlete to survive in circumstances that would defeat most people. In Bariatu, each ward receives Rs 1,200 as a monthly stipend, with the bare minimum of medical checks. One of the girls in the centre, where poor-quality food often led to sickness, says, “Many of the girls are suffering from haemoglobin deficiency leading to anaemia. The Government does not provide for any medical check-ups for the girls.”The centre does not, of course, have an astroturf. Young players grow up playing on the battered mud of the high-school field where their centre is based. The state Government had imported an astroturf which has been lying unused for five years.”Only when a player is selected for national or international matches is she provided with turf practice,” says Asunta Lakra, another NSTCC ward former principal of the Bariatu school and president of the Jharkhand Women’s Hockey Association, says, “There should be proper training on turf. The turf in Bariatu has been lying unused for the past five years while the girls have been asked to play on sand grounds.”The links between tribal Jharkhand and hockey run deep. Local folklore tells of tribals carrying bamboo staves while grazing cattle and whittling them into hockey sticks and roots into balls even before the arrival of Christian missionaries in the area.In the tribal tradition, the “khassi and murga” tournament (goat and rooster) – where the prizes are these two species – is also famous, though few would remember that in 1928 the captain of the Indian hockey team at the Amsterdam Olympics was also a tribal, Jaipal Singh Munda.STATE OF AFFAIRS: The Bariatu Hockey Centre is yet to get an astroturfSome of the other famous players from the region are Savitri Purti, Biswasi Purti, Helen Soy, Alma Guria and Anarita Karketta. Their successors are a group of three girls with bright eyes and bright smiles who have brought distinction to a corner of the country which is usually forgotten.This is that part of India where no roads exist, where the rivers are not spanned by bridges and where people live in the hope that one day their lives will be significant enough for the country to at least acknowledge them. That day came when these women came home with shiny pieces of metal around their neck and saucer-sized smiles on their faces.Sumrai is the daughter of a poor farmer, Banarwas Tete, who along with wife Santoshi made the long trip from their village in Kasira Maram Toli, 170 km from Ranchi, and waited at the railway station for the train carrying their daughter who had travelled far away on a remarkable journey.The train was only five hours late and the eruption of joy among all who had waited for the three slightly built players to emerge at the door brought tears to the eyes of those closest to them. “Sumrai came from a tiny village where no one expects to play for the country,” says Banarwas.advertisementA village so remote that when the rains come, in the absence of a proper road, people use boats to get around. He worked as a general labourer to push his daughter through her hockey career, but it meant making a cruel choice: pulling Sumrai’s elder sister Karuna out of school.Masira Surin, one of seven children, would never have been met by her parents in Ranchi had it not been for her uncle, schoolteacher and hockey enthusiast William Topno. Surin’s father, Samuel, says he was not keen on his daughter pursuing hockey “until she played for the state”. As important afsars (officials) made a fuss over his daughter and her two teammates, who were garlanded and led through the city in an open jeep, Kanti Baa’s father, Silas, felt he was doubly blessed. His cousin, Father Fame Baa, a history lecturer at St Xavier’s College, Ranchi, didn’t need to live in their village, Kunder Mundra, anymore, and his daughter Kanti was going to earn more than Rs 12 lakh in prizes from the prime minister, her employers and the state Government – all for being very good at running up and down the field with a hockey stick, a dervish in a blue dress.The daughters return quickly to their strange nomadic roller-coaster lives, and travel to a country called Korea to play in another tournament, the Asian Games in October. “Pusan will be easier,” says Sumrai confidently of the competition where there are only three teams other than the Indians. “But we’ll have to train hard and won’t take any chances.”When the three girls from the weather-beaten villages of Jharkhand step onto foreign fields again in October, they will carry a piece of their very distinctive homeland with them. They keep alive the flickering flame of hockey in a sometimes-forgotten corner of India.last_img read more

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9 months agoNewcastle not interested in Cabaye reunion

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Newcastle not interested in Cabaye reunionby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United will not sign former midfielder Yohan Cabaye on a free transfer.The 32-year-old was this week released by Al Nasr after just six months at the club.Cabaye was part of the Toon squad that finished fifth in the Premier League in 2011/12, leading to some fans asking for his return. However, the Shields Gazette says manage Rafa Benitez has other priorities for signings this month.The Spaniard is focused on signing a number 10, a winger and a left-back. last_img read more

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Angela Bassett And LaTanya Richardson Jackson To Be Honored At LadyLike Foundation

first_imgActress/Philanthropist Angela Bassett, Actress/Philanthropist Pauletta Pearson Washington, BET Networks Chair and CEO Debra Lee and Actress/Philanthropist LaTanya Richardson Jackson will be honored at the 10th Annual Women of Excellence Awards Luncheon, it was announced by LadyLike Foundation’s President and CEO, Leah Pump.LadyLike Foundation will confer the honors on Saturday, June 2, 2018 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel’s International Ballroom. Holly Robinson-Peete serves as the luncheon’s emcee. The event is expected to raise a half million dollars for the nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate, empower and inspire young girls living in underprivileged communities around the Greater Los Angeles area. Funds raised at the luncheon enable LadyLike Foundation to provide five scholarships to college bound young ladies from the inner city of Los Angeles.“We are thrilled to honor Angela Bassett,” says Leah Pump. “Her excellence as an actress, wife, mother and philanthropist, is an inspiration to so many of the young ladies our organization serves. Angela Bassett is one of the most celebrated actresses of our time, who stars in blockbuster films, yet one of the most gratifying moments of her career was merging her faith and talent, giving voice to various characters in the all-time best selling audiobook, THE BIBLE EXPERIENCE. Ms. Bassett truly embodies the Woman of Excellence.”Broadway, film and television actress Pauletta Pearson Washington will be honored for “her Excellence as an actress, wife and mother and for being one of the kindest and most philanthropic women I know,” says Ms. Pump.As BET Networks Chairman and CEO, Debra L. Lee is one of the most powerful and influential people in entertainment. “Throughout her career, Ms. Lee has set patterns of excellence with BET Networks’ programming and corporate philanthropy. She is a trailblazer who has inspired so many young ladies, especially African-American girls, to aspire to a career as top executives in corporate entertainment, a field once so heavily dominated by men. Ms. Lee truly shattered the glass ceiling with her monumental achievements. We are excited to honor her as a Woman of Excellence,” says Ms. Pump.“Tony Award-nominated actress LaTanya Richardson Jackson is a true inspiration to young women, that even with tremendous career success, one should always find time to give back,” says Ms. Pump. “She and her husband, Samuel L. Jackson established the Samuel L. & LaTanya R. Jackson Foundation to carry out their commitment to a range of philanthropic issues in the United States and Africa. LaTanya has received a number of awards for her philanthropic work including The United Negro College Fund, and the N.Y. Keeper of the Dream Award. We feel privileged to honor her as a Woman of Excellence.”The LadyLike Foundation is a faith-based nonprofit organization whose purpose is to educate, empower and inspire young women living in underprivileged communities. Through cutting edge resource programs, workshops, mentorships and life lessons, young ladies are challenged to reach their highest potential and become the successful, well-rounded “Lady” they were created to be. The organization’s Women of Excellence Luncheon is the primary fundraiser for LadyLike Foundation.last_img read more

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Defense might be Ohio States blueprint for success

Trey Burke couldn’t help but smile. Michigan’s sophomore point guard had just hit a leaning, double-clutched 3-pointer that banked off the backboard and through the net. It was, perhaps, the toughest shot Burke had taken all game, and he made it. After a contest full of ill-fated attempts, something had finally fallen for the Wolverines’ Player of the Year candidate, and it brought a sense of sarcastic joy to the face of the Columbus native. The shot was irrelevant in the game’s final outcome. It came with one second left and Michigan down six. It wasn’t the shot that Burke, or the Wolverines, needed. That shot had come 15 seconds prior, with Michigan down two, and the ball in the hands of its sophomore playmaker. Burke, going one-on-one against Aaron Craft, took a step-back three over the Ohio State junior guard’s outstretched arms. It went in and out, and with it, so did the Wolverines’ chances of beating the Buckeyes. Playing in front of about 25 friends and family members clad in Maize and Blue No. 3 jerseys, Burke struggled. The former Buckeye fan and current best friend of former OSU star Jared Sullinger went 4-13 from the field, his worst shooting performance of the season. Burke wasn’t the only Wolverine that had little success in their 56-53 loss to the Buckeyes on Sunday, though. Michigan (16-1, 3-1 Big Ten) shot 38 percent as a team. OSU (13-3, 3-1 Big Ten) held the Wolverines’ big four of Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr., Nik Stauskas, and Glenn Robinson III to 35 points, 24 less than their season average. “Ohio State has a really, really good defensive team. Really good,” said Michigan coach John Beilein. “You’re watching a team that plays defense, buys into it and has very skilled defenders on the perimeter.” The Buckeyes, led by Craft, were physical with the Wolverines from the get-go. Burke opened the game with a three, but the Wolverines proceeded to go scoreless for the next seven minutes, eventually falling in a 29-8 hole. “They did beat us up a little bit,” Hardaway Jr., a junior guard, said. Michigan relies heavily on its underclassmen, with two freshmen – Stauskas and Robinson – in its starting five. Those players, Stauskas especially, were noticeably irritated by OSU’s in-your-face, deny-the-ball style of play. Stauskas, a 6-foot-6 sharpshooting guard from Canada, was held scoreless for the first time this season. After being sent to the bench midway through the first half, Stauskas couldn’t contain his anger as he yelled four-letter words not able to be repeated. “They were denying (Stauskas), so we just had to continue to play. When we got (the ball) in the paint, they wasn’t leaving him,” Burke said. “I just told him to ‘keep getting good looks, I’m going to find you, we’re all going to find you.’ Ohio State was taking him away on the perimeter.” For OSU, they need not look any further than Sunday’s game as a blueprint on how to be successful the rest of the season. Having lost their first three games against ranked opponents (Duke, Kansas, Illinois), the Buckeyes notched their first big win of the year Sunday. The Buckeyes handed Michigan its first loss of the season – thereby denying the Wolverines of their first No. 1 ranking in 21 years – and they did it with their defense. Sure, OSU shot the ball well in the first half and at one point had a shooting percentage of nearly 70 percent. But that likely won’t happen very many times again this season, if at all, as the Buckeyes proved by regressing to a 44 percent output by the end of the game. What they can rely on is their defense. It’s what makes them great, Beilein said. “This team, and (OSU coach Thad Matta’s) teams, have always been this way … the perimeter defense in particular is exceptional. Why? They’ve been doing the same shell drills for two, three, four years. They really work at this and they’re really good at it,” Beilein said emphatically. Against the Wolverines, nearly every Buckeye was solid, some playing spectacularly. Craft held Burke, a probable first-team all-American with a skill set analysts have compared to NBA great Chris Paul, to his worst outing of the season. “Craft is one of the best defenders. You have to give him credit. I love playing against him because he makes me better and he makes me work,” Burke said. “Craft is as good as there is, as I’ve ever seen. He’s tremendous,” Beilein said. OSU sophomore guard Shannon Scott blocked a Burke layup in transition, sending the sold-out Schottenstein Center crowd into a vibrating roar. Senior forward Evan Ravenel and sophomore center Amir Williams limited the Wolverines’ big men to 13 points. Even junior forward Deshaun Thomas, called “Shaun” at times last year by Matta because he “played no D,” stepped up. “I thought Deshaun played harder on defense tonight than he ever had. That is the type of defensive play we need from him to be a successful team,” Matta said. To continue to be successful, OSU, admittedly, needs to have the type of energy and effort it brought into Sunday’s contest every game. Beilein said he doesn’t think that will be a problem. “Thad’s a great defensive coach and they’ve got great defenders, that’s a great combination,” he said. OSU, ranked No. 11 in the most recent Associated Press poll, next travels to Michigan State to take on the No. 18 Spartans at 6 p.m. Saturday. Michigan is now ranked No. 5 by the AP. Lousville took hold of the No. 1 ranking. read more

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