FHFA To Disburse GSE Allocations to Housing Trust Fund

first_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago FHFA To Disburse GSE Allocations to Housing Trust Fund in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News, Secondary Market Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Housing Trust Fund HUD 2020-02-27 Seth Welborn Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: Housing Trust Fund HUD Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Director Mark Calabria has announced that he has authorized the disbursement of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s affordable housing allocations for 2019 to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the Housing Trust Fund of $326.4 million and to the Department of the Treasury for the Capital Magnet Fund of $175.8 million.In early 2019, the National Housing Conference (NHC) along with its coalition members submitted a letter to then-FHFA Acting Director Joseph Otting on Monday, urging the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to continue allocations to the Capital Magnet Fund (CMF) and the National Housing Trust Fund (HTF) in 2019 and beyond.The CMF is a program created in the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA), administered by the Treasury Department, and is open to community development financial institutions and non-profit housing organizations like Habitat for Humanity. Its purpose is to develop, preserve, rehabilitate, or purchase affordable housing, as well as related economic development activities such as day care centers, community health clinics, and workforce development centers.According to the letter, the CMF provided funding for non-profit developers and lenders to do pre-development work, create revolving loan funds, establish loan loss reserves, and provide loan guarantees—all critical pieces of affordable housing and community development. So far the CMF has received four rounds of funding totaling $434 million, which has or will help to attract $13.5 billion in other capital into these projects.In the first three years of HTF, $659.8 million has been allocated to states. Because the HTF is administered as a block grant, each state has the flexibility to decide how to best use HTF resources to address its most pressing housing needs. Most states have chosen to use their HTF investment to build and preserve affordable rental housing for extremely low-income veterans, seniors, people with disabilities or special needs, and people experiencing homelessness. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agocenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago February 27, 2020 1,557 Views About Author: Seth Welborn The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: The Single-Security’s G-Fee Impact Next: Court Opinion ‘Important Win’ for Mortgage Servicing Industry Home / Daily Dose / FHFA To Disburse GSE Allocations to Housing Trust Fund Subscribelast_img read more

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4-H Congress.

first_imgMore than 1,300 U.S. teens are headed to Atlanta for the 79th National 4-H Congress.”‘Make the Difference,’ the theme of this year’s Congress (Nov. 24-28), tells the story for these young people,” said Susan Stewart, National 4-H Congress director.”Chosen from their history of leadership in communities in 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, each of these young people comes to Atlanta with a desire to increase their ability to lead,” she said.The youths, ages 14-19, will attend educational programs and cultural events. They will hear from Miss America 2001 Angela Baraquio, Paralympic gold medalist and author Scot Hollonbeck, Kennesaw State University President Betty Siegel and Atlantan Milton Creagh.18 Educational ProgramsThe delegates will choose from more than 18 educational programs. The topics will range from colorization of America and cultural diversity to the future of agriculture, stress management and teen violence.”Congress delegates will return home better able to ‘Make a Difference’ in their own communities,” Stewart said. “The knowledge gained during their stay in Atlanta will be used to make positive changes in communities across the nation. Atlanta provides an excellent backdrop for the diversity of cultural experience National 4-H Congress offers.”Community Service, TooDelegates will learn community service, too, from a hands-on point of view. They will make more than 200 coats for Atlanta homeless children. Along with Miss America, delegates will also work at Art of the Season, a fund-raising event for Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, leading children in making crafts.”Each delegate will also bring a book to donate to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta’s ‘Reach Out & Read’ program,” Stewart said. “Since National 4-H Congress came to Atlanta in 1998, delegates have annually spread across Atlanta and participated in a wide variety of projects. They are encouraged to start similar community service projects when they return to their own communities.”On the last day of Congress, the delegates will have a youth issues discussion reflecting what they learned during the week.last_img read more

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FIFA relaxes rules on release of players for internationals

first_imgClubs will not  be obliged to release their players if there is a mandatory quarantine in the country where the club is based,in the country where the international will take place or there are travel restrictions between the two locations and there are no specific exemptions for the players. The ruling applies to the men’s international window from August 31 to September 8 and the women’s window from September 14-22.FIFA had already decided that internationals in those slots  could only take place in Europe.  FIFA on Monday relaxed the rules on the release of players for the upcoming international window “in light of the recent evolution of the coronavirus pandemic”.Clubs are usually obliged to release players to national teams during those parts of the calendar reserved for international games, however quarantine rules in many countries will make travel impractical, FIFA said in a statement.”Many national governments have again implemented travel and immigration restrictions due to a renewed increase in COVID-19 infections. Some of these measures directly impact international competition, such as mandatory periods of quarantine or self-isolation and travel restrictions,” the statement explained.  Topics :last_img read more

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Monmouth County Archivist Gary Saretzky Closes a Chapter in County History

first_imgBy Eileen Moon Monmouth County archivist Gary Saretzky, who retired at the end of October, gave a public tour of the county archives during Monmouth County Archives Day Oct. 12.Photo by Christina Johnson And although he’ll no longer have a “day job,” his post-retirement schedule is a busy one. He’ll be lecturing on 19th century New Jersey photographers through the New Jersey Council on Humanities. He’ll also continue to write for Garden State Legacy, an online history journal, and will remain engaged as president of the Princeton Preservation Group, which meets four times a year. He’s also writing accompanying content for a book of photos of the Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia. The archives, which are open to the public, contain marriage records, naturalization records, war records, property transfers, court cases, photographs and ephemera that open doors to the past for historians, genealogists and other researchers who turn to the county for help. Fortunately, it’s a job Saretzky was deeply interested in and thoroughly qualified to do. “If you find what you are looking for, (the site) opens up an email to the archive. Then, the archive team will locate the record and copy it at no charge. “It’s a wonderful public service,” Saretzky said. “Without these indexes,it would be really tedious togo through these thousandsof boxes,” Saretzky said.Among the records indexedonline are marriage licensesand immigration documents. The archive also compiles an annual exhibit on some aspect or era in Monmouth County history. Some past exhibits focused on World War I, Prohibition, the Great Depression, the Civil War and the Revolutionary War. The current exhibit is Four Centuries of Monmouth County Women. Today, more than 1,000 people a year use the archives to do personal or professional research and find information they need. Thanks to the ongoing work of employees and volunteers, much of the county’s collection is searchable online. “We’re constantly scanning records,” Saretzky said. “We use volunteers extensively to help organize and categorize the material. Everybody wants everything digitized overnight but it’s very time-consuming. Last year we actually captured more than a million pages and images.” On October 31, Monmouth County archivist Gary Saretzky will close the door on one chapter in a career that has placed him at the heart of Monmouth County history for the past 25 years. He’s also happy about establishing public events that include the annual Archives and History Day that takes place each October. “Every year now we have about 300 people come,” he said. The event features exhibit tables staffed by members of some 63 organizations engaged in public history in Monmouth County and other counties. “The public can learn about all these different groups and join them if they want,” Saretzky said. Relocating to his home state of New Jersey, Saretzky took a job with the Educational Testing Service in Princeton. He was the first archivist hired by the organization well-known for administering SAT and GRE examinations and other educational tests. That changed in August 1994 when the collection opened to the public. The county archive, which is located on the lower level of the Monmouth County Library Headquarters in Manalapan, is now under the direction of Monmouth County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon. In addition to his work with the county archives, Saretzky is an author and photographer who taught history of photography at Mercer County College and coordinated the public history internship program at Rutgers University. He left Rutgers in 2016 after 22 years engaged in placing students in archival internships. In the early 1990s, when Monmouth County Clerk Jane Clayton was seeking professional input in preserving and organizing the county’s vast collection of records, Karl J. Niederer, the state archivist, recommended Saretzky as a consultant. When he began his career in 1969, there were about 1,000 archivists nationwide. Today there are 6,000. It’s a career in demand by a wide range of organizations these days, from corporations like IBM and Disney to sports teams and music groups like the Grateful Dead. center_img The records are searchable via the indexes the county has created with the help of staff members and volunteers. Since 1994, Saretzky has presided over a collection of government records and historical ar tifacts that are a treasure trove of information spanning more than 400 years of Monmouth County history. Another event held each spring is Preservation Day, when the county archives branch offers tours of the archives and lectures on historic preservation topics like how to preserve family photos. Saretzky earned a bachelor’s degree in history and master’s in American history with a concentration in archival administration at the University of Wisconsin, where he also worked part time in the manuscripts division of the Historical Society of Wisconsin. Saretzky views the creation of the index and the development of the archives’ extensive web presence to be two of the things he is most proud of accomplishing in the past two-and-a-half decades. “We currently have more than 280 different web pages,” he said. Anyone who has attempted to organize their own family archives may have a small inkling of how challenging it must be to organize the records of an entire county. “The first task after Istarted here was to get thearchives open to the public,”Saretzky said. “They had acollection here but it wasn’tset up to handle visitors.” One of the recommendations Saretzky made following his review was that the county hire a full-time archivist. Clayton offered him the job. His role was to compile and organize ETS archives, which involved everything from conducting oral interviews to writing the histories of each testing protocol the organization of fered. During his years at ETS, Saretzky was appointed to the State Historical Archives Advisory Board, established by Gov. Brendan Byrne in 1975. “When I left Rutgers I had more than 800 students, and some of them are now archivists,’’ he said. “That was a very nice experience. I also liked that I was helping young people develop careers in a field that interested me.” As he reaches the end of his 25 years as Monmouth County archivist, Saretzky admits to feeling a little regretful that 25 years wasn’t long enough to finish the archiving job, but he’s confident the work will continue in good hands. The archives include the photo library from the Daily Register newspaper ranging from 1971-1987. Earlier photos from the Register were destroyed in a fire. “We still have over 300,000 photo negatives and color positives,” Saretzky said. “My plan is to pretty much continue what I’m already doing, but not here,” he said.last_img read more

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One step closer to HIV vaccine

first_imgAlthough South Africa has the most HIV-positive people of any country, efforts in prevention and treatment are bearing fruit. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morefree images, visit the image library) Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom emphasised the importance of research that will yield results in the long, rather than short term. Prof Lynn Morris (left), heads of Aids research at the NCID, and Dr Penny Moore, who led the research project.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Judith Annakie-Eriksen  Communications officer, Caprisa  +27 31 260 4096 or +27 82 782 1276 RELATED ARTICLES • Taking HIV testing to the masses • Software speeds HIV diagnosis • New centres to help fight HIV in KZN • HIV testing drive for SA students • SA team leads study on anti-HIV gelJanine ErasmusThe South African medical and scientific community is abuzz with the news that local researchers have documented one method of the production in the body of broadly neutralising antibodies (BNAbs) against HIV – a discovery that could lead to the future development of a vaccine.Researchers from the Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (Caprisa), together with the ministers of health and science and technology, made the announcement at a media briefing in Johannesburg. Also in attendance were the US embassy’s Chargé d’Affaires, Virginia Palmer; Nancy Knight, country director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and Caprisa’s Prof Carolyn Williamson, a respected virologist.Caprisa was founded in 2001 as a partnership between the universities of KwaZulu-Natal, Cape Town and the Western Cape, as well as New York’s Columbia University and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) in Johannesburg.Its main function is to carry out research of local and global relevance, and to advance the world’s understanding of the HI virus, as well as the tuberculosis connection.“There is a range of different Aids prevention technologies,” said epidemiologist Prof Salim Abdool Karim, opening the proceedings, “and one of them is the development of an Aids vaccine.“The work carried out by Caprisa and other institutions is crucial to our understanding of how the virus evolves in individuals, how the body responds, and how the virus mutates to escape the body’s onslaught,” he said. “This enigma, the variability of the virus, is the big challenge.”The five-year study was led by virologist Dr Penny Moore, and funded partly by the Department of Science and Technology, the CDC, the Wellcome Trust, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Technology Innovation Agency, among others.The results were published in a paper co-authored by 20 scientists – of whom 16 were South African – and released on 21 October in the online version of Nature Medicine journal under the title Evolution of an HIV glycan–dependent broadly neutralizing antibody epitope through immune escape.Joking that South Africans can see that their tax money is being well spent, Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi praised the research team for the discovery, saying that it is a testimony to the world-class quality of South African scientists.Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom also lauded the team. “This is an energetic group of emerging young scientists,” he said, “who are not all male and not all white. This is the new generation that is finding answers to the serious challenges confronting not just South Africa, but the world.”He said it was significant that the research team is led by women. “One in five adult women in South Africa is HIV-positive. We need an arsenal of measures to fight the disease, but the prospects of winning the war without a vaccine are simply not good.”Hanekom stressed the importance of research such as this, that doesn’t necessarily yield short-term results, adding that any investment will pay off, and that the knowledge in itself is just as valuable as the results.Remarkable discovery“There are two types of HIV antibodies,” explained Moore, a senior scientist from the Centre for HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infections at the NICD, “one which is strain-specific, and the other that is broadly neutralising.”The difference between these two types is that the former only recognises the virus that is present in the body which has produced it, while the latter type, which was itself only discovered about three years ago, is able to recognise and work against many different strains.“Broadly neutralising antibodies are obviously more useful to us, but they are also much rarer, only appearing in one out of five individuals. Luckily we can learn much from these rare people.”The remarkable discovery centres around two HIV-positive women from KwaZulu-Natal, both of whom were participants in separate Caprisa programmes – the Acute Infection Study, and the widely publicised Tenofovir Gel Microbicide Trial.Both women spontaneously started to produce BNAbs some years ago, although at the time it was not known how or why. Moore’s research focused on discovering the mechanism through which these valuable substances are produced.By tracing the women’s clinical history and studying the evolution of the virus and the antibodies’ target site, Moore and her team found that its mutation is the trigger for the production of broadly neutralising antibodies.The key is the protective coating, or envelope, that the virus surrounds itself with in order to escape the action of antibodies. The target site in question is a sugar or glycan, located at a specific area on the protein envelope. This is an area of vulnerability to which an antibody can attach.But the glycan, known as sugar 332, is not always present at the start of infection, as the team discovered.“Because the virus is attacked right from the start by less powerful antibodies,” explained Moore, “it is forced to mutate in order to stay one step ahead of the body’s response. Over time it coats itself with this sugar, which becomes its Achilles heel.”Tests conducted with 200 different HIV strains from around the world – half of them from Africa – have shown that the rare BNAbs are effective against 88% of them.“This sugar is present in many viruses,” said Moore, “and because of it we now know one pathway to the development of broadly neutralising antibodies.”Cat and mouse gameThe HI virus is one of those that are able to mutate rapidly to avoid deactivation by antibodies produced by the immune system.“It mutates perhaps faster than any other virus,” said Moore. “A vaccine works on more stable viruses, and this is the reason that we don’t yet have an HIV vaccine.”The thinking amongst researchers these days is not how to produce a vaccine, she said, but rather what can be learned from HIV-positive people that will help scientists to make a vaccine. Moore pointed out that the new finding is not a vaccine, but opens up a new path towards the development of one.“This discovery is not about a cure,” said Abdool Karim, “but rather about prevention of infection.”Heroines rememberedThe two women came in faithfully once a month for many years, said Moore, to donate blood for research purposes. One of them is doing very well, with no detectable viral load at the moment, but the other has died from complications caused by tuberculosis which evolved into first the multidrug-resistant and then the extremely drug-resistant strain.“However, she has left a legacy that will go far beyond her own life,” said Abdool Karim.Motsoaledi agreed, saying that the subjects of the study deserved as much praise as the research team.“Without them even the best idea can’t be tested. We owe our thanks to the two women, who are also scientists in a way, because through them we have found this breakthrough.”Unfortunately the women’s health didn’t improve as a result of the formation of BNAbs, because the virus had already established itself over many years of infection and the damage was done.“For a vaccine to be effective,” said Moore, “it has to get into the body before the virus.”The way a vaccine would potentially work, she said, would be as a sequential type of immunisation where the envelope protein without the sugar would be administered first – this would trigger the production of normal HIV antibodies. Later the protein with the sugar would be used to trick the body into replicating the natural situation and producing BNAbs.Making progress in the fightSouth Africa has made progress in recent years in the war against the Aids epidemic. Although the country has the highest number of HIV-positive people in the world, there are 1.7-million people on antiretroviral treatment, and this strategy is slowly yielding results.“In 2008 the rate of mother-to-child transmission was 8%,” said Motsoaledi. “We have brought it down to 3% in 2010 and 2.7% in 2011, and we are confident that we’ll bring it to a negligible level, below 0.1%, by 2015.”Other achievements include the tenofovir microbicidal gel trial, initiated by Caprisa in KwaZulu-Natal, and the decrease in the mortality rate of children under five, he said.But the development of a vaccine is still years in the making, and until then Motsoaledi urged all South Africans to continue to take precautions and live a responsible lifestyle.“HIV is a problem of all South Africans as well as the world in general. We need to take responsibility for our own lives.”last_img read more

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Muntinlupa, QC trounce MPBL rivals

first_imgGlobe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Cagers of Muntinlupa, being supported by Angelis Resort, dumped the Caloocan Supremos-Longrich, 89-76, in the other game of the tournament organized by Sen. Manny Pacquiao with former PBA MVP Kenneth Duremdes as commissioner.The Capitals turned to ex-La Salle stalwart PJ Barua in the early goings to take a 29-17 lead, then went to big man Jessie Collado in the second half to pick up their second win in as many games and join Navotas and Batangas City in a share of the lead.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCollado finished with 17 points and eight rebounds while Barua added 15 points. There will be no ‘next Pacquiao’ NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers AFP official booed out of forum Quezon City and Muntinlupa routed their respective rivals on Tuesday night to pick up their second straight triumph in the MPBL Anta-Rajah Cup at JCSGO Gym in Quezon City.The Royal Manila-backed Capitals subdued the Imus Bandera-GLC Truck and Equipment, 84-75.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City PLAY LIST 01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:16CJ Peralta says QC judge followed rules in giving nod to raids on militant offices01:51SC gives QC court one month extension to resolve Maguindanao massacre case01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice LATEST STORIES Read Next MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

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Aussie Women’s Work their Magic

first_img@Eden_RichardsThe Australian Women’s Open side has put on a clinical performance to defeat New Zealand 10-3 at Sunshine Coast Stadium on Friday night.Aussie Tamika Upton stole the show, constantly bamboozling the Kiwi defence to score a hat-trick of touchdowns in an excellent individual effort.Doubles to Danielle Davis and Laura Peattie provided great support for Upton, with a six-touchdown to one second half seeing Australia seal victory.The Aussies led from start to finish and are now 1-0 up in the best of three Trans Tasman Series. After a scoreless first 5 minutes it was Australia who broke the deadlock, with Rachelle Davis latching onto a beautiful ball from sister Danielle Davis to make the score 1-0 in the 6th minute.New Zealand hit back straight away, tying the score at 1-1 courtesy of some fancy footwork from Mahina Paul in the 7th minute.Danielle Davis continued her strong start to the match, dummying and scoring in the 10th minute to give her Australia a 2-1 lead at the halfway point of the first half.The Aussies extended their lead in the 14th minute, with Ashleigh Kearney using her speed to beat two Kiwi defenders in the centre of the park.A wonderful cut-out ball from New Zealander Tara Mohi found Kate Day in the 18th minute and she crossed on the left wing to keep the Kiwis in touch at 3-2.But Australia hit back seconds later, with a slick sequence of team passing putting Upton over to give the side a 4-2 lead.This is how it stayed to finish the first half and Australia made the perfect start to the second stanza, scoring within the first minute of play through Samantha Rodgers.The lead then grew to four touchdowns in the 22nd minute, with Danielle Davis scoring her second to put Australia up 6-2. New Zealand found themselves in real trouble in the 26th minute as Peattie crossed for the first of her two touchdowns to make it 7-2.Upton then stole the show for Australia, making a 60m break to score a great individual touchdown that all but sealed the match for the Aussies halfway through the second half.That 8-2 lead soon became 9-2, with Upton grabbing her third touchdown with seven minutes to play.New Zealand managed a consolation touchdown in the 36th minute courtesy of Cassandra Engler, but the damage had already been done as they trailed 9-3.Australia capped off a big win in the 39th minute, with Peattie scoring her second touchdown to make it 10-3 to the Aussies with just over a minute to play.That’s how the scoreline stayed in what was a dominant display from AustraliaThe Aussies now have all the momentum heading into Day Two as they look to seal the Women’s Open Series with a game to spare.Australia 10 (Upton 3, D. Davis 2, Peattie 2, R. Davis, Kearney, Rodgers touchdowns) defeated New Zealand 3 (Engler, Day, Paul touchdowns)Related LinksWomen’s Work Their Magiclast_img read more

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19 days agoReal Madrid favourites for £100M Van de Beek – after Man Utd snub

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Real Madrid favourites for £100M Van de Beek – after Man Utd snubby Paul Vegas19 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid are regarded as favourites to land Ajax’s £100million-rated Donny van de Beek – just three months after Manchester United decided against signing the midfielder.United failed to make a move for the 22-year-old Dutch international after his Amsterdam club quoted the Reds a £35million asking price, says the Mirror.And now Real have stepped up their efforts to land Van Beek at the end of the season – and have made it clear that they will not be put off by Ajax’s dramatically inflated valuation.Van Beek, who came thought the famed Ajax academy, was in the team beaten by United in the 2017 Europa League final.He has since developed into one of Europe’s top goalscoring midfielders. last_img read more

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5 Bold Predictions For The South Region Of The NCAA Tournament

first_imgFive bold predictions for the South Region. Miami Plug DanceTwitter/@MiamiHurricanesThe 2016 NCAA Tournament gets underway tonight with the first pair of play-in games. Play in the South Region begins at 9:10 p.m. ET on tru TV, with two 11-seeds, Wichita State and Vanderbilt, facing off for the right to play Vanderbilt. The South Region is very intriguing. It contains the No. 1 overall seed in the field, along with a number of teams capable of busting the bracket. We’ll find out which team emerges on March 26 at the KFC YUM! Center in Louisville.We’re here to help you make your picks in the South, but we’re not going with just chalk. Without further ado, let’s look at our five bold predictions for the South Region. Get Started: Wichita State “Shocks” The Competition >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6last_img read more

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