Kootenay Ice gets snowed under by Cariboo Cougars

first_imgCariboo, first place in BCMMHL standings with a 7-2-1 mark, completed the sweep Sunday, pounding Kootenay 9-2 Sunday.It took the Cougars just over a period to get rid of their bus legs.The slow start allowed Kootenay to take a 3-2 lead into the first period intermission thanks to goals by Quinn Klimchuk of Castlegar, Trail’s Jake Lucchini and Mitch Foyle of Fruitvale.But Cariboo erased the one-goal deficit by outscoring the Ice 3-1 in the second.The Cougars added a four-spot in the third, including three goals on the power play, to complete the rout.John Skeet of Christina Lake completed the scoring for Kootenay.Ryan Forbes, who finished the game with five points including two goals, led Cariboo. Logan Styler also scored twice for the Cougars.Sunday, Cariboo held leads of 2-0 and 6-1. Eli Jarvis paced the Cougar attack with five points — a goal and four helpers.Nathan Craft scored three times for Cariboo. Grayson Reitmeier of Nakusp and Lucchini replied for KootenayFemale goalie Kimberley Newell and Brett Soles split the netminder duties for Kootenay.The Ice, falling to 1-6-1 on the season, travel to Victoria Saturday to meet the South Island Thunderbirds in the first of two meetings.The T-Birds, 1-6-3, are two points ahead of the Ice in BCMMHL [email protected] The B.C. Major Midget Hockey League leaders put some serious hurt on the basement dwellers from Kootenay this weekend in the Sunflower City.The Cariboo Cougars out scored the Ice 18-6 in two games to sweep the BCMMHL series this weekend at the Community Complex.The Cougars opened the series scoring four power play goals en route to a 9-4 victory over the Ice Saturday.last_img read more

Read More →

This Bomber team soars to Mount Sentinel Junior Girl’s title

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers junior girls volleyball team strung together an undefeated streak to capture the Mount Sentinel Junior Girls Invitational tournament on Saturday afternoon.The Bombers needed a come-from-behind effort over J.L Crowe in the tournament final to clinch the title.In a spirited opening game of the match, the LVR team fell behind early and despite a strong comeback late in the game fell short 25-23 in the best-of-three. A back and forth second game saw LVR setter Hanna Quinn serve for the game which went to the Bombers 27-25. “The girls seemed to struggle with focus in this match,” said Bombers coach Jennifer Kidd.“After beating J.L. Crowe twice in two sets in the round robin, I think they were a little over confident. Then when they were down by quite a few points they became nervous and started to scramble. They needed to be aggressive and trust each other.”The Bombers found the groove that helped the team win the round robin of the tournament in the third game. The LVR juniors came out with a 15-8 win when middle Bailey Stefani put away the match with a solid hit. “What an amazing finish to the weekend,” said Kidd.“The girls came together and worked as a team, not an easy task when you’re down a few points. They listened to us and to each other, they trusted each other and dug in to fight for each and every point to finish the match.”[Assistant coach] Megan [Rushton] and I are so proud of the determination shown by each of the girls.”The Junior Bombers will now travel to Nakusp on Thursday for a play day.last_img read more

Read More →

THE CARNIVAL IN THE INFIELD RETURNS TO THE GREAT RACE PLACE MAY 28-30

first_imgA festival of fun is on its way to Santa Anita Park this Memorial Day Weekend! For three straight days, including Memorial Day, May 30, fans of all ages can enjoy the Carnival in the Infield.With thrilling rides, including a Ferris wheel, the Zipper, Super Slide, bumper cars and challenging games complete with prizes, families can enjoy a fair-type feel alongside live Thoroughbred racing. A smorgasbord of carnival fare will take over The Great Race Place, including last year’s hit, the caramel covered candy apples, as well as loads of BBQ, snow cones, bacon wrapped cinnamon rolls, churros, funnel cakes, cotton candy and much, much more! All the usual Family Fun Zone activities of pony rides, face painting and inflatable jumpers will still be available as well Memorial Day weekend.Admission and parking is FREE when you enter Gate 6 off of Colorado Place. Fans can purchase ‘unlimited rides’ wristbands online for only $10! Wristbands will also be available for purchase on-site for $15.The Carnival begins at 12 noon each day and will conclude at 7 p.m. each night. First post is 2 p.m.Visit santaanita.com/events to purchase your wristbands for Memorial Day Weekend and for complete information regarding Santa Anita Park events this Spring!last_img read more

Read More →

One step closer to HIV vaccine

first_imgAlthough South Africa has the most HIV-positive people of any country, efforts in prevention and treatment are bearing fruit. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morefree images, visit the image library) Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom emphasised the importance of research that will yield results in the long, rather than short term. Prof Lynn Morris (left), heads of Aids research at the NCID, and Dr Penny Moore, who led the research project.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Judith Annakie-Eriksen  Communications officer, Caprisa  +27 31 260 4096 or +27 82 782 1276 RELATED ARTICLES • Taking HIV testing to the masses • Software speeds HIV diagnosis • New centres to help fight HIV in KZN • HIV testing drive for SA students • SA team leads study on anti-HIV gelJanine ErasmusThe South African medical and scientific community is abuzz with the news that local researchers have documented one method of the production in the body of broadly neutralising antibodies (BNAbs) against HIV – a discovery that could lead to the future development of a vaccine.Researchers from the Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (Caprisa), together with the ministers of health and science and technology, made the announcement at a media briefing in Johannesburg. Also in attendance were the US embassy’s Chargé d’Affaires, Virginia Palmer; Nancy Knight, country director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and Caprisa’s Prof Carolyn Williamson, a respected virologist.Caprisa was founded in 2001 as a partnership between the universities of KwaZulu-Natal, Cape Town and the Western Cape, as well as New York’s Columbia University and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) in Johannesburg.Its main function is to carry out research of local and global relevance, and to advance the world’s understanding of the HI virus, as well as the tuberculosis connection.“There is a range of different Aids prevention technologies,” said epidemiologist Prof Salim Abdool Karim, opening the proceedings, “and one of them is the development of an Aids vaccine.“The work carried out by Caprisa and other institutions is crucial to our understanding of how the virus evolves in individuals, how the body responds, and how the virus mutates to escape the body’s onslaught,” he said. “This enigma, the variability of the virus, is the big challenge.”The five-year study was led by virologist Dr Penny Moore, and funded partly by the Department of Science and Technology, the CDC, the Wellcome Trust, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Technology Innovation Agency, among others.The results were published in a paper co-authored by 20 scientists – of whom 16 were South African – and released on 21 October in the online version of Nature Medicine journal under the title Evolution of an HIV glycan–dependent broadly neutralizing antibody epitope through immune escape.Joking that South Africans can see that their tax money is being well spent, Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi praised the research team for the discovery, saying that it is a testimony to the world-class quality of South African scientists.Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom also lauded the team. “This is an energetic group of emerging young scientists,” he said, “who are not all male and not all white. This is the new generation that is finding answers to the serious challenges confronting not just South Africa, but the world.”He said it was significant that the research team is led by women. “One in five adult women in South Africa is HIV-positive. We need an arsenal of measures to fight the disease, but the prospects of winning the war without a vaccine are simply not good.”Hanekom stressed the importance of research such as this, that doesn’t necessarily yield short-term results, adding that any investment will pay off, and that the knowledge in itself is just as valuable as the results.Remarkable discovery“There are two types of HIV antibodies,” explained Moore, a senior scientist from the Centre for HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infections at the NICD, “one which is strain-specific, and the other that is broadly neutralising.”The difference between these two types is that the former only recognises the virus that is present in the body which has produced it, while the latter type, which was itself only discovered about three years ago, is able to recognise and work against many different strains.“Broadly neutralising antibodies are obviously more useful to us, but they are also much rarer, only appearing in one out of five individuals. Luckily we can learn much from these rare people.”The remarkable discovery centres around two HIV-positive women from KwaZulu-Natal, both of whom were participants in separate Caprisa programmes – the Acute Infection Study, and the widely publicised Tenofovir Gel Microbicide Trial.Both women spontaneously started to produce BNAbs some years ago, although at the time it was not known how or why. Moore’s research focused on discovering the mechanism through which these valuable substances are produced.By tracing the women’s clinical history and studying the evolution of the virus and the antibodies’ target site, Moore and her team found that its mutation is the trigger for the production of broadly neutralising antibodies.The key is the protective coating, or envelope, that the virus surrounds itself with in order to escape the action of antibodies. The target site in question is a sugar or glycan, located at a specific area on the protein envelope. This is an area of vulnerability to which an antibody can attach.But the glycan, known as sugar 332, is not always present at the start of infection, as the team discovered.“Because the virus is attacked right from the start by less powerful antibodies,” explained Moore, “it is forced to mutate in order to stay one step ahead of the body’s response. Over time it coats itself with this sugar, which becomes its Achilles heel.”Tests conducted with 200 different HIV strains from around the world – half of them from Africa – have shown that the rare BNAbs are effective against 88% of them.“This sugar is present in many viruses,” said Moore, “and because of it we now know one pathway to the development of broadly neutralising antibodies.”Cat and mouse gameThe HI virus is one of those that are able to mutate rapidly to avoid deactivation by antibodies produced by the immune system.“It mutates perhaps faster than any other virus,” said Moore. “A vaccine works on more stable viruses, and this is the reason that we don’t yet have an HIV vaccine.”The thinking amongst researchers these days is not how to produce a vaccine, she said, but rather what can be learned from HIV-positive people that will help scientists to make a vaccine. Moore pointed out that the new finding is not a vaccine, but opens up a new path towards the development of one.“This discovery is not about a cure,” said Abdool Karim, “but rather about prevention of infection.”Heroines rememberedThe two women came in faithfully once a month for many years, said Moore, to donate blood for research purposes. One of them is doing very well, with no detectable viral load at the moment, but the other has died from complications caused by tuberculosis which evolved into first the multidrug-resistant and then the extremely drug-resistant strain.“However, she has left a legacy that will go far beyond her own life,” said Abdool Karim.Motsoaledi agreed, saying that the subjects of the study deserved as much praise as the research team.“Without them even the best idea can’t be tested. We owe our thanks to the two women, who are also scientists in a way, because through them we have found this breakthrough.”Unfortunately the women’s health didn’t improve as a result of the formation of BNAbs, because the virus had already established itself over many years of infection and the damage was done.“For a vaccine to be effective,” said Moore, “it has to get into the body before the virus.”The way a vaccine would potentially work, she said, would be as a sequential type of immunisation where the envelope protein without the sugar would be administered first – this would trigger the production of normal HIV antibodies. Later the protein with the sugar would be used to trick the body into replicating the natural situation and producing BNAbs.Making progress in the fightSouth Africa has made progress in recent years in the war against the Aids epidemic. Although the country has the highest number of HIV-positive people in the world, there are 1.7-million people on antiretroviral treatment, and this strategy is slowly yielding results.“In 2008 the rate of mother-to-child transmission was 8%,” said Motsoaledi. “We have brought it down to 3% in 2010 and 2.7% in 2011, and we are confident that we’ll bring it to a negligible level, below 0.1%, by 2015.”Other achievements include the tenofovir microbicidal gel trial, initiated by Caprisa in KwaZulu-Natal, and the decrease in the mortality rate of children under five, he said.But the development of a vaccine is still years in the making, and until then Motsoaledi urged all South Africans to continue to take precautions and live a responsible lifestyle.“HIV is a problem of all South Africans as well as the world in general. We need to take responsibility for our own lives.”last_img read more

Read More →

Rain in Punjab and Haryana to boost wheat crop

first_imgWidespread rain during the last two days in Punjab and Haryana is expected to boost wheat crop sowing this rabi season, officials and experts told The Hindu.An expected drop in minimum temperature during the first week of December would also help the temperature-sensitive wheat crop, which needs cold conditions to thrive.Rain and thunder showers at most places in Punjab and at many places in Haryana during the past 48 hours have brought cheer to farmers, especially the wheat growers who were in for another round of irrigation this month. The west Uttar Pradesh region also received isolated showers, according to the India Meteorological Department (IMD).“The current active wet spell over Punjab and Haryana is mostly over and thereafter the weather conditions are likely to improve with an expected fall in minimum temperatures in the first week of December,” said Surinder Pal, Director at the India Meteorological Department, Chandigarh.According to government data, in Punjab 75% of wheat sowing has been completed. The total sowing in the State is expected to be around 35 lakh hectares during the ongoing rabi season. In Haryana, wheat has been sown on nearly 18.05 lakh hectares so far. Both States are major contributors of wheat to the central pool.‘Welcome showers’“These are welcome showers. Sowing of wheat had started in early November and now it has reached the crown-root initiation stage. For farmers who have sown the crop in early November, it’s time for second irrigation of the crop, and hence, the rain has come at the right time. If at this stage the crop is not irrigated, it could result in less yield,” Anand Sharma, Deputy Director General of the Agromet Advisory Service Division at IMD said. Wheat is sown between late October till December while the harvesting starts from April onwards.last_img read more

Read More →

15 days agoKoeman explains role in plans to buy Wycombe Wanderers

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Koeman explains role in plans to buy Wycombe Wanderersby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveHolland coach Ronald Koeman has spoken of his role in plans to buy League One side Wycombe Wanderers.Reports said the trio of Dennis Bergkamp, Henrik Larsson and Dirk Kuyt put in a bid for the club earlier this year but the Adams Park board opted to go in another direction.Koeman told reporters: “I don’t know how close that is.“I’m in the background, let me put it like that. I’m an advisor. If they want it I’m available for advice but I’m not the one who is going to invest, I’m not the one to decide how the process will continue.“They have the dream to buy a club and they’re working on that but I’m not directly involved and I didn’t want that.“I’ve been asked if they want some advice and if they think I can provide them with good advice I’m available. But I’m not really the one to talk about that a lot.” last_img read more

Read More →

5 Bold Predictions For The South Region Of The NCAA Tournament

first_imgFive bold predictions for the South Region. Miami Plug DanceTwitter/@MiamiHurricanesThe 2016 NCAA Tournament gets underway tonight with the first pair of play-in games. Play in the South Region begins at 9:10 p.m. ET on tru TV, with two 11-seeds, Wichita State and Vanderbilt, facing off for the right to play Vanderbilt. The South Region is very intriguing. It contains the No. 1 overall seed in the field, along with a number of teams capable of busting the bracket. We’ll find out which team emerges on March 26 at the KFC YUM! Center in Louisville.We’re here to help you make your picks in the South, but we’re not going with just chalk. Without further ado, let’s look at our five bold predictions for the South Region. Get Started: Wichita State “Shocks” The Competition >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6last_img read more

Read More →

Jason Mraz To Perform At 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games Opening

first_imgThe world’s largest sports and humanitarian event this year – the 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Austria – today announced two very special performances for the event’s Opening Ceremony on Saturday, March 18, 2017.Performers include multi-Grammy award-winning folk-pop songsmith Jason Mraz and 13-year old winner of America’s Got Talent Grace VanderWaal.Nearly 2,700 athletes and 1,000 coaches representing 107 nations will be welcomed at the Opening Ceremony, held at the Planai Stadium in Schladming, a regular stop on the World Cup circuit and site of the 2013 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships.To honor the athletes, Jason Mraz will be planning a special performance which will be a powerful unification of Special Olympics youth/athletes and the groundbreaking new music and arts education program that is supported by the Jason Mraz Foundation, called LIVE ART. Children from a local Schladming music program will also participate in the performance. Mraz will perform his record-setting song, “I’m Yours,” as well as his hit song “I Won’t Give Up” – which he will perform alongside VanderWaal, LIVE ART participants and the local Schladming choir.“I’m incredibly honored to be asked to perform during the Opening Ceremony, celebrating the courage, determination and spirit of every Special Olympics athlete who traveled to compete in these Games,” said Jason Mraz. “Special Olympics is an organization that I feel embraces the skills and talents of every person and I do the same thing through my work with LIVE ART.”LIVE ART is an equally inclusive program for both students with and without disabilities, of all ages, who work together for a year using performing arts to share messages of acceptance, compassion and empathy. Mraz works as an artistic advisor and funder alongside LIVE ART Director Erin Thomas-Foley, creating an inspiring culminating performance each year featuring nationally recognized recording artists performing with the students. The program is produced by SPARC, The School of the Performing Arts in Richmond, Virginia where Jason studied as a child. www.sparconline.org/liveart.Princess Charlene of Monaco, Special Olympics Global Ambassador and Olympic Gold Medalist Hannah Teter, American short track speed skating Olympic champion Apolo Ohno, Hall of Famer and Special Olympics Global Ambassador and Board Member Dikembe Mutombo, Olympic figure-skating legend and Special Olympics International Board Member Michelle Kwan and NBA Legend and Special Olympics International Board Member Sam Perkins, and other distinguished personalities will cheer on the athletes at the Planai. A global audience can watch coverage provided by ESPN, an official broadcast partner of the World Games. ESPN is distributing the Opening Ceremony around the world in multiple languages. Tickets to the Opening Ceremony and this once-in-a-lifetime experience are available for purchase via www.oeticket.com.More than 20,000 fans including families, volunteers, Heads of State, Ministers of Sport, and celebrities including trainer and television personality Jillian Michaels and ballroom dance champion, professional dancer and choreographer Louie Van Amstel will attend the Games and cheer on the athletes over the eight days of competition.“The whole world will come to Austria and will celebrate a big sports and social event with us. We look forward to welcoming all athletes and coaches and guests in Graz, Schladming and Ramsau,” said Marc Angelini and Max Pichler, the two CEOs from Austria2017.More than four years preparation are nearly over and the Organizing Committee is ready for the Games. Angelini and Pichler added, “We hope that it’s going to be an unforgettable event for everybody!”Specific details of the night’s event, which will include the Parade of Athletes and culmination of the Final Leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run that will light the World Games cauldron, are being kept under wraps until closer to the event.The World Games will be hosted from 14 March-25 March and feature 9 Olympic-style sports: Floorball, Floor Hockey, Stick Shooting, Figure Skating, Short Track Speed Skating, Alpine Skiing, Snowboarding, Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. These Games will showcase the unlimited potential of people with intellectual disabilities – the largest disability population in the world. Competitions will take place in the cities of Graz, Schladming, Rohrmoos and Ramsau. All competitions are free and open to the public. Plan your outing to support the athletes by checking out the competition schedule here: Austria 2017 Games Schedule.The Opening Ceremony will take place at the Planai Stadium in Schladming, Austria on Saturday, March 18, 2017 starting at 2:00 p.m. EST/7:00 p.m. local Austrian time and will be brought to a worldwide audience by ESPN and local Austrian broadcast partner ORF. To learn more and purchase tickets, visit www.oeticket.com. Please visit www.austria2017.org for additional updates to Opening Ceremony performances.Earlier this week, Special Olympics announced the first-ever social fundraising collaboration with GoFundMe. As part of the effort, nearly 500 GoFundMes are being created by teams, coaches, as well as by Olympians, top professional athletes, YouTube stars and other influencers to support athletes attending the Special Olympics World Winter Games in Austria next month. To donate and learn more about the athlete stories, and view all Special Olympic GoFundMes, visit: gofundme.com/specialolympics.last_img read more

Read More →