Plentiful Treasures by RTG Asia

first_imgCasino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 30th October 2018 | By Aaron Noy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter There’s ONE slot machine that everyone in Macau plays. Now we have it online. Topics: Casino & games Slotscenter_img Plentiful Treasures by RTG Asia There’s ONE slot machine that everyone in Macau plays. Now we have it online.There’s 15,622 slot machines in Macau. Yet the queues form for only one, the classic like RTG Asia’s latest release: Plentiful Treasure. Players are creatures of habit, coming back time and again to their old favourites, and we expect this to be the players favourite on release. Perhaps it’s the FOUR separate jackpots. Or the 50,000 to 1 maximum pay off per way—and 243 ways to pay. Or the familiar antique, three-legged “ding,” getting three or more of which will get you free spins. While Bao is your wild, if you get an also wild Pearl, you multiply your winnings by five. Hit the Gold Coin Feature, where you choose your coins, and win one of Fu, Lu, Shou or Cai’s jackpots.Whatever the features they prefer, your players can now find the excitement and pleasure of their already favourite game now on their mobile, tablet or PC, in RTG’s new Plentiful Treasure. Companies: RTG Asia Email Addresslast_img read more

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Legal wagering to boost sports viewership, poll suggests

first_img A survey conducted by a New Jersey university suggests that sports betting may drive an increase in sports viewership, with a clear majority of those surveyed saying they are more likely to tune in if they have wagered money on a game.The findings were revealed in the latest edition of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, a regular survey of public views on sports and related businesses that has been carried out since 2006 by the Seton Hall University, a private Roman Catholic academic institution.The report suggests that 70% of consumers are more likely to watch a sporting event on television or via a stream if they place a bet on it. This increases to 88% when focusing on the 18-29 age bracket.The poll also revealed an apparent appetite for mobile betting, with 40% of respondents saying they would bet via their phone rather than at a casino or gambling parlour. Respondents were also mainly of the opinion that states should be left to regulate sports betting, with 65% favouring the status quo, as opposed to a 26% minority that backed a federal framework.However, the Seton Hall Sports Poll also revealed a degree of uncertainty towards sports betting among respondents. It found that 61% were worried legal betting across the country could result in higher levels of match-fixing in major US sports leagues.Those polled were also worried at how legalised sports wagering could fuel a rise in problem gambling across the US, with 43% agreeing to some extent. Such concerns were more apparent among older respondents, when, in comparison, just 5% of those aged 18-29 feared a rise in problem gambling levels. The poll also revealed apparent uncertainty among consumers regarding the legality of wagering, with 52% of respondents unsure if sports betting is legal in their state. There was also a clear split over whether the Supreme Court was right to repeal PASPA and allow more states to legalise sports betting. While 40% approved of the move, 16% were against it and 44% were unsure or had no opinion on the matter.Rick Gentile, director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, said: “Watching is the first step towards creating a paying fan. In the 1980s, the leagues became aware that fantasy sports were heightening interest, and eventually, they embraced it. Now they appear to be ‘all in’ with something once impossible to imagine.”The figures on fan engagement back up earlier claims by the American Gaming Association (AGA) that major leagues in the country would attract more viewers if they were able to work with the gaming industry. In October, the AGA and Nielson Sports said the four major leagues could earn a collective $4.2bn (£3.29bn/€3.70bn) extra per year if they embrace legal sports betting.Revenue for Major League Baseball could increase by $1.1bn, with basketball’s NBA is set to benefit by an extra $585m. Ice hockey’s NHL could see revenue hike by up to $200m per year, while the NFL American football league may see its revenue climb by $2.3bn each year. Since the repeal of PASPA earlier this year, New Jersey, Delaware, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and West Virginia have all moved to legalise and subsequently launch sports betting services. Many other states are also in the process of developing bills to follow suit. This week, Kansas lawmakers opened a debate in the hope of filing a bill in the state’s House of Representatives during the 2019 legislative session. Last week, Washington D.C. opted to drop a so-called royalty fee for sports leagues from a bill before progressed it forward to a full council hearing. However, states could face fresh challenges to legalise sports betting, according to a leaked Congressional draft bill. The bill would require states to have betting legislation approved by the US Attorney General and purchase official major league data.Image: Max Pixel Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Tech & innovation Legal & compliance Legal wagering to boost sports viewership, poll suggests AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Poll conducted by New Jersey private univesity Seton Hall also flags concerns over problem gambling Regions: US 5th December 2018 | By contenteditor Email Addresslast_img read more

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Reel Rush 2 by NetEnt

first_img Reel Rush 2™ is a Medium/High volatility, fast-paced slots game with 5 reels with up to 3125 bet ways. The game features Wild Substitutions, Random Features, Re-Spins, Free Spins and Super Free Spins. 12th November 2019 | By Aaron Noy Reel Rush 2 by NetEnt Casino & games Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Reel Rush 2™ is a Medium/High volatility, fast-paced slots game with 5 reels with up to 3125 bet ways. The game features Wild Substitutions, Random Features, Re-Spins, Free Spins and Super Free Spins.Reel Rush 2™ borrows elements from social gaming-inspired mechanics, and looks and feels like a social app! It’s a feature-packed adrenaline frenzy – the game packs no less than 8 random features and 2 different Free Spins games (one with an Increasing Multiplier), all combined in perfect synch and delivered in a fun and colorful way.Learn more about this slot here! Topics: Casino & games Slots AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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The adult in the room

first_img14th February 2020 | By Stephen Carter GVC distinguished itself in 2019 by putting its head above the parapet and speaking out in favour of wholesale industry changes to better protect players from gambling harms. As director of regulatory affairs, Martin Lycka (pictured left) has taken a leading role in this push. By Robin HarrisonPreviously the start of a new year would have seen operators discussing plans for certain markets or the launch of new products. In 2020, however, the conversation has changed.The focus is not what’s going to be on offer, or where it’ll be offered. What the industry – and a broad array of stakeholders and opponents – are interested in is how it will be offered.Many in the sector will be hoping that they’ll be able to look back on 2019 as gambling’s annus horriblis. It saw the whistle-to-whistle advertising ban implemented in the UK, just one event in a year in which everything operators did or said seemed to heap more criticism on the industry.Sweden’s igaming market launched, and heralded a new wave of enforcement for a range of offences, real or otherwise. Italy banned gambling advertising. Spain threatened to follow.Yes, the US opened for business, but as Keith Whyte of the National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG) says in a recent interview with iGB North America, the rapid roll-out of sports betting may bring a new wave of responsible gambling (RG) scandals.GVC Holdings has in some ways been at the centre of the storm engulfing the industry – it would be hard for one of the biggest companies in the sector to avoid the headwinds. But it has also been leading the fightback.Much of this appears to be driven by chief executive Kenny Alexander.He has seemingly taken the stance that if his business is going to account for an ever-growing percentage of total customer spend and market revenue, he’s going to make sure that cash is coming from sustainable sources.The initiatives are numerous and far reaching. The responsibility for implementing them, and ensuring they are successful, falls to director of regulatory affairs Martin Lycka.Lycka and his team “have to be the jacks, not necessarily masters, but jacks of a lot of trades,” he explains.“The bottom line is that the function [of the regulatory affairs team] is what the people who regard the function turn it into.”Regulatory affairs is deceptively vague. As Lycka says, some could take that title and assume it’s the team responsible for applying for licences in different markets.That includes “the joy of the US licensing process”, he adds – but also includes sports integrity. Corporate social responsibility, administered through the GVC Global Foundation, also falls within its remit.Essentially it’s everything from the licences to regulatory risk.At a time when a UK parliamentary committee is calling for online slots to be subject to a £2 cap, over a perception that the industry is some sort of rapacious monster bleeding players dry, social responsibility becomes a regulatory risk.In Lycka’s eyes, the need for a new approach towards social responsibility is a simple question of sustainability.“If you allow me to be cynical for a split second, nobody wants addicted gamblers in the market,” he says. “Nobody wants them to be their customers and we genuinely want to help them. We see that as our responsibility.”To do this, GVC will have to patiently explain to industry opponents why arbitrary bans exist or limits based on “urban myths and misrepresented data”.It could be argued that others have tried this approach before. In fact one supplier crunched the numbers, came up with the average spend on fixed odds betting terminals (FOBTs) and concluded that there was no need for a statutory limit on the machines. We all know how that went.Data crunching GVC, on the other hand, will not rely on some internal data that it claims proves its point and hope for the best. It inherited a partnership with Harvard Medical School’s Division on Addiction, which had previously worked with Bwin, then Bwin.party between 2005 and 2004.This has been continued and expanded, but not just to produce a few peer-reviewed academic articles. Through the relationship, GVC will provide the Division on Addiction with anonymised player data to be used for research into markers of gambling harms. This in turn will act as a stress test of its existing controls, allowing them to be refined and enhanced. “From GVC’s perspective, the key benefit of that cooperation is that our existing processes will get assessed,” Lycka says.“Beyond that, if there are any loopholes identified, and we are told we need to step up in certain areas, or do something differently or better, then we will correct those learnings and reflect them in our product design.”To an extent it appears to be a case of working out which battles are worth fighting, and where to cede ground.GVC was a driving force behind the whistle-to-whistle advertising ban in the UK, for example, and is now pushing the industry to implement a total broadcasting ban.Lycka argues that it “made sense” considering the size of the GVC business to take a lead on pushing for restrictions around advertising. Where it may push back, however, is on the issue of statutory limits.On the FOBT side, the argument was lost long before the operator even acquired Ladbrokes Coral to gain a UK retail presence. For online, it’s still in play. That’s not to say it’s a fight to preserve revenue. It’s more an issue of player protection.“Arbitrary statutory limits, in my view, cannot work,” Lycka says. What constitutes a fair limit, he says, is very subjective to the individual customer.Something massively unaffordable for one player might be – to repeat a phrase used by a certain UK politician – “chicken feed” to another.Limits should therefore not be based on what society as a whole can afford, but what that individual player can afford to spend, he continues.Of all regulators, the GB Gambling Commission has, at least publicly, shown the greatest level of interest in using affordability as a determinant for mandatory limit setting.In Lycka’s eyes, affordability is a more efficient way of protecting players than blanket limits. Overly restrictive arbitrary controls “actively incentivise” players to gamble with unlicensed operators, he warns.This could be the ultimate consequence of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Gambling-related Harms’ call for a £2 online slot limit.“It seems to revolve around a very simplified consistency argument: ‘If there is a £2 limit for FOBTs, there needs to be a £2 limit for online slots’,” he says. “This is an over-simplistic approach for all manner of reasons.“First, is it really consistent? Where is the consistency with the land-based casino market, where no such limits are proposed?“Second, this approach risks driving customers to unlicensed, black market operators who will provide none of the player protections that are surely the goal of stakeholders who want to provide a safe environment.”Altering perceptions Many inside and outside the gambling industry would say this is common sense. But it’s damning that the industry has reached a point where the APPG can come out with a series of punitive new controls and be given the time of day.Few would deny that in the past, the industry has failed to make a positive case for itself in the UK. Lycka admits gambling companies “only have ourselves to blame” here.“I like to think that we are getting slightly better, but there’s a lot to learn on that front,” he concedes. The sign that these lessons are in fact being learned comes from GVC’s efforts in emerging markets such as the US and Brazil.“I would argue that they present us with an opportunity to change the perception of the industry and again, make it slightly safer,” he explains.“That was one of the rationales behind us launching the GVC US Foundation, partnering the National Council on Problem Gambling and Harvard Medical School.“We’ll [also] be supporting the Seton Hall Law School to launch a gambling and hospitality university curriculum.“I’m hopeful that in a foreseeable future we’ll be announcing other similar projects with other very reputable partners who will be only too keen on helping out with this type of education.”GVC is certainly casting its net wide, but arguably this is necessary, to involve every stakeholder in the process, especially the customer.After all, the success of these social responsibility efforts ultimately comes down to that end user. And as they’re the one that places a bet or decides against it, there’s a degree of personal responsibility that has arguably been overlooked by industry critics.“I believe the customer’s role has been, to some extent, sidelined because the industry is expected to do a lot,” Lycka says. “There’s also an element of customer responsibility. I believe that we need to put them in a position whereby they get all the information they need.”Let’s face it, these people are not helpless. Gambling is limited to those aged 18 and above in Europe, and often 21 plus in the US.“It has to be a combination of regulation, voluntary action by operators, then the customer. The customer makes the final choice.”Local behaviours But the customer in the UK may make very different choices to a customer in Spain, for example. And for a business that is active in the vast majority of regulated markets, GVC can’t develop a strategy for one territory and guarantee it will work in another. In the UK, for example, it has spearheaded research into markers of harm, with nine key variables used to determine whether a player is potentially suffering from the ill effects of gambling.In a different country, there could be six, or 11 markers, Lycka points out. What may mark a problem in one territory could be normal in another.Let’s take Spain and the UK as an example.“Typically, in the UK I would suggest that most people would be in bed by midnight,” Lycka explains. “If somebody is still up, on their computer and betting, that is definitely an indication of a potential problem.“On the other hand, if you take Spain or Latin American countries, they typically wouldn’t have their dinner until half 10, if not later. Which means that they would more likely be placing a bet after midnight.“Football is traditionally played later there too, so it could be a late night kick-off. So, the past-midnight marker of harm may not necessarily apply. The individualisation of the tests that are used for detecting problematic behaviour is important.”He points out that as a fan of the New England Patriots, he might stay up to watch a game, which would not kick off until around 1am in London. Therefore if he placed a bet, he could – wrongly – be considered to have a problem.“Individual quirks are absolutely important, just as when it comes to markets and to promotions we offer,” Lycka says.“You wouldn’t necessarily be offering cricket markets in Sweden and you wouldn’t be offering hockey markets in the UK. [And] we would have to treat things the same way when it comes to responsible gambling.”This individualised approach is being extended to sports integrity, another key tentpole in the GVC Foundation’s social responsibility efforts.It has already partnered high-profile teams such as Borussia Dortmund in Germany and Italy’s Inter Milan, as well as establishing the German Sports Integrity Forum.This comes as part of efforts to “educate anybody who would care to listen to us” about how the gambling industry can work closely with sports clubs to stamp out corruption, Lycka says.“We’ve also included sports integrity clauses and integrity programmes in our sponsorship contracts with clubs.”The motivation behind this, he adds, is exactly the same as the research project with Harvard Medical School: it’s about educating stakeholders on what the industry is actually doing to have a more positive impact.As he says, the industry needs to get better in how it conveys what it does to a wider audience.“Folks need to be better prepared to recognise the good stuff being won by the industry. Of course there’s a lot of bad stuff – less and less I would argue – and we’ve learned our lessons, usually the hard way.“But it is still frustrating if you believe that you’ve done something great for your customers, something that will help them.”The industry needs to “step away from the self deprecation”, he adds. “The key [goal] in my view is to learn how to put all those messages – CSR, efforts to protect players, and efforts to uphold sports integrity – out there in a more efficient manner.”He argues that part of the industry today still fails to “shout from the rooftops” about the good work they are doing.Lycka picks out Kindred as a business that has “led the charge” on responsible gambling across Europe, and effectively communicated its efforts to the wider world.This isn’t self-serving in his view. Instead, it highlights that rather than GVC being the lone voice in a sector running scared of new regulations, there is a genuine, concerted, cross-sector effort to protect players.“If I may convey one message in this interview – and I’ll sound like a cliché – we are all in it together, in terms of protecting the customer and at the same time actually making sure that we have created a safe environment, a safe space within which the regulated operators can exist.”GVC may well have appeared the adult in the room in 2019, but if the industry is serious about making 2020 the year when things got better, it expects others to grow up too. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops GVC distinguished itself in 2019 by putting its head above the parapet and speaking out in favour of wholesale industry changes to better protect players from gambling harms. As director of regulatory affairs, Martin Lycka has taken a leading role in this push Casino & gamescenter_img The adult in the room Email Address Topics: Casino & games Sports betting Strategy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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Barrière partners BetConstruct for online betting launch

first_imgThe group currently operates 28 land-based casinos, as well as a gaming club, 18 hotels, and around 140 restaurants and bars in France. Email Address “The online gaming market is a new axis of development which will allow the group to consolidate its positions and promote its brands, as well as increase our brand awareness toward our new players and retain our land-based casino customers,” Barrière Group chairman and chief executive Dominique Desseigne said. 15th September 2020 | By Aaron Noy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games France’s online gambling market reported a 5.6% year-on-year decline in revenue for the second quarter of 2020, after the sports betting vertical saw stakes and revenue plummet as a result of novel coronavirus (Covid-19). The betting platform will be built on BetConstruct’s technology, and will be available on desktop and mobile, including on iOS and Android applications. It will be licensed to operate sports betting by L’Autorité nationale des jeux (ANJ), which oversees gambling activities in France. However, growth in the first quarter of 2020, coupled with a resilient performance from betting on racing and stellar quarter for poker in Q2, meant that online gaming revenue grew 8.3% in the first half. Barrière partners BetConstruct for online betting launchcenter_img Barrière Group’s first online gaming product, BarrièreBet, will offer sports betting to players, with horseracing and poker expected to be added later. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: France Topics: Casino & games BetConstruct founder and CEO, Vigen Badalyan, added: “With a remarkable journey that began back in 1912, Barrière has gone through many eras of growth and transformation to establish itself as one of the market leaders in French casinos. “Now they seek to leverage the strength of their brand and their expertise to make the transition to online and we are happy to partner with them as they look to realise their online ambitions. We wish Barrière hundreds of years of success and growth in the online world.” Companies: BetConstruct French casino operator Barrière Group has entered into a long-term partnership with industry supplier BetConstruct, for the launch of its new online betting platform on 16 September.last_img read more

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Virginia Lottery approves sports betting regulations

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter “We have received and evaluated several hundred comments and suggestions submitted by citizens, sports betting and casino operators, and most of the major professional sports leagues, including the National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association and the Professional Golfers’ Association,” Virginia Lottery executive director Kevin Hall said. Lawmakers in June then began accepting written suggestions from sports leagues and sportsbook operators as it developed rules for the market. Preliminary draft regulations were posted online for public comment from July 15 until September 9. Topics: Lottery Lottery The Virginia Lottery Board has approved sports betting rules, clearing the way for the licensing process to begin next month. The Virginia Lottery Board has approved sports betting rules, clearing the way for the licensing process to begin next month. 16th September 2020 | By Aaron Noy The Virginia General Assembly had required the Virginia Lottery Board to give its approval to the regulations by September 15. Earlier this year, Virginia lawmakers passed a bill to legalise online and mobile sports betting, which will allow wagering on professional collegiate sports event, excluding Virginia-based college and university teams. Read the full story on iGB North America. Regions: US Virginia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Virginia Lottery approves sports betting regulations Email Addresslast_img read more

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Lion Gold by Stakelogic

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Slots Topics: Casino & games Slots Email Address Lion Gold by Stakelogic For reviews you can download the affiliate pack for this game at First Look Games here! 21st September 2020 | By Aaron Noy Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Find the King of Beasts on 24 September in Lion Gold. Try your luck in the Wild Moon bonus game and get to experience our latest innovation: Mega Super Stake!last_img read more

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Delaware igaming revenue grows again in September

first_imgConsumers won a total of $17.3m from online gambling with the state’s three licensed operators in September, compared to $11.4m last year and $19.1m in August. Online casino The month-on-month increase comes despite consumers wagering less, with the total amount spent on online gambling in September standing at $18.1m, which was 8.6% lower than in August. 16th October 2020 | By Robert Fletcher Topics: Online casino Online gambling revenue in Delaware climbed 118.3% year-on-year to $840,146 in September, the second consecutive month of growth for the market. However, the amount did represent a 44.8% increase on the $12.5m wagered by players in September last year. Regions: Delaware Video lottery accounted for $610,356 of total revenue in the month, with players spending a total of $10.9m on this vertical. Table games followed with $178,387 in revenue off $6.4m in wagers, while poker rake and fees generated $51,404 in revenue. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Read the full story on iGB North America. Tags: iGaming Finance Delaware Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Delaware igaming revenue grows again in September Email Addresslast_img read more

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Sportpesa prepares legal action amid former chair’s fraud allegations

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The alleged transfers and other “suspicious transactions”, N’Dungu claimed, led to professional services giant PriceWaterHouseCoopers resigning as auditor of its Kenyan business. Sportpesa prepares legal action amid former chair’s fraud allegations The operator said the “gravity and defamatory nature of the serious and utterly false allegations” necessitated legal action. Ndung’u added that, despite his stake in Pevans East Africa, he first heard Sportpesa had allowed Milestone Games to use its brand through social media when the deal was announced by Sportpesa chief executive Ronald Karauri. “SportPesa has ongoing and regular working arrangements with large auditing and tax advisory companies and any changes in the past to these relationships have been driven purely by commercial reasons,” the spokesperson said. Ndung’u, who owns a 17% stake in Sportpesa’s former holding company Pevans East Africa, has alleged the business’ non-Kenyan shareholders transferred money to “various offshore funds” in a number of different countries.  While the Sportpesa spokesperson did not comment on the specifics of its relationships with auditors, it said Ndung’u’s description of this relationship was false. “We are not aware of any investigation by the United Kingdom Serious Fraud Office into Sportpesa,” the Sportpesa spokesperson said. Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Regulation Online sports betting Sports betting regulation “Pevans East Africa has not transferred any such funds to offshore accounts,” they said. Kenyan operator Sportpesa said it is considering legal action against its former chair Paul Ndung’u, following allegations about the conduct of the business’ foreign shareholders. The Serious Fraud Office does not comment on whether a business is under investigation and so could not confirm or deny this meeting. Tags: Sportpesa Betting Control and Licensing Board BCLB Email Address In the UK, meanwhile, Ndung’u alleged that banks requested Sportpesa Global Holdings close its accounts and KPMG resigned as auditors, as well as claiming that officials from the country’s Serious Fraud Office visited Sportpesa’s Nairobi office. He said the announcement of Sportpesa’s return revealed that ownership of the brand had been transferred from Pevans East Africa to Sportpesa Global Holdings, a business with the same ownership as Pevans East Africa and which owns many of Sportpesa’s international operations such as in Tanzania, Great Britain and Russia. However, the spokesperson said the company’s board has always been made fully aware of major decisions. “All Sportpesa brand actions have always been done with the knowledge and explicit approval of the board members of all companies involved and in compliance with company bylaws and local regulatory guidance,” they said. The brand returned to operation in its native Kenya last week under a license held by Milestone Games more than a year after it withdrew following a tax increase that followed months of disputes with authorities. However, this return was short lived as regulator the Betting Control and Licensing Board (BCLB) ruled that Milestone did not have permission to use the Sportpesa brand as Sportpesa owner Pevans East Africa was still engaged in an appeal over its own licence. Regions: Africa East Africa Kenya However, a Sportpesa spokesperson rejected this and all other allegations, stating that Sportpesa “is fully compliant with all legal and tax requirements in the jurisdictions in which we operate”. Ndung’u added that he did not know who owned Milestone, suggesting this was another area on which Kenyan shareholders had not been briefed. 3rd November 2020 | By Daniel O’Boyle Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Legal & compliancelast_img read more

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Intralot’s Sokratis Kokkalis steps back into chief executive role

first_img Greek gaming supplier and operator Intralot has replaced its group chief executive for the second time this year, with chairman Sokratis Kokkalis returning to its top role last Friday (13 November). Intralot’s Sokratis Kokkalis steps back into chief executive role Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Revenue for the six months to 30 June fell to €168.2m (£150.6m/$199.2m), with revenue from Intralot’s licensed operations (B2C) division hit even harder, falling 74.9% to €57.7m. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Kokkalis previously stepped into the role of chief executive in March 2019, replacing Antonios Kerastaris who had been in the role since 2014. In September, results published by Intralot showed a 55.5% year-on-year decline in revenue for the first half of 2020, after the B2B and B2C sides of the business faced difficulties caused by struggles in Turkey and Bulgaria. It is not yet clear whether Kokkalis will be taking on the role in a permanent or temporary capacity. People moves As chairman of the company’s board of directors, Kokkalis has stepped in to replace Christos Dimitriadis who only took over the role some in March. Dimitradis will shift to a new position, overseeing the supplier’s growth in the US market.center_img The company faced a number of difficulties in addition to turmoil caused by the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. Its Bulgaria-facing brand Eurofootball saw its operations shut down after its licence was suspended in February. 16th November 2020 | By Conor Mulheir The loss of its Turkish sports betting contract in 2019 also continued to have a knock-on effect, seen as a major driver of losses in the supplier’s B2B and government contracts division. Regions: Greece Topics: Casino & games Lottery People Sports betting People moves Tags: Intralot Kokkalis thanked Dimitriadis, who became chief executive from his position as chief services and delivery officer, for his contribution and wished him success in his future role. Email Addresslast_img read more

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