World Cup decision on Christchurch

first_img“However, we needed to weigh up the risks of continuing with matches in Christchurch with just 25 weeks until the world’s third largest sporting event kicks off. Sadly, we collectively agreed the risks were too great. The timeframes for repairs were too tight, the uncertainty too much.”NZRU chief executive Steve Tew added: “Our hearts go out to Canterbury fans given the inevitable disappointment this decision will cause for many. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ruled out: AMI Stadium requires extensive repair so won’t be able to host any World Cup gamesCHRISTCHURCH WILL will no longer be a venue for Rugby World Cup games this autumn following the earthquake in the city.The AMI Stadium – or Stadium Christchurch as it would have been called during the tournament – requires extensive repairs following last month’s earthquake and it’s not known how long they will take. Coupled with the damage to infrastructure in the city – hotels, transport links and so on, Rugby World Cup Ltd took the decision to move games elsewhere in New Zealand.The two quarter-finals already due to take place in Christchurch have been switched to Eden Park in Auckland while the five pool games scheduled to be held there will be moved to other stadiums around the country, although it has not been decided where yet.“We know Cantabrians are passionate about Rugby and we know that many wanted the matches to remain as a way to unite and heal their shattered city,” said RNZ 2011 Chairman Brian Roche.center_img “Tournament partners are looking into a number of initiatives that will give Cantabrians a chance to be part of our Stadium of Four Million. We still want them to play a part in hosting a successful Tournament and to share in the excitement of this event.”Any supporters who have purchased tickets for games in Christchurch will be offered a full refund or tickets to the rearranged matches. For further information on this, please click here.last_img read more

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Can the French clubs rule in Europe?

first_img Top trumps: Castres’ Rory Kockott is the top point scorer in the Top14By Gavin MortimerWITH THE 2012-13 Heineken Cup starting on Friday how healthy are the French clubs ahead of the opening round? Runaway Top 14 leaders Toulon play Montpellier on Sunday evening but elsewhere the best of Britain and Ireland face France’s finest.Ulster v CASTRES, pool 4Currently sixth in the Top 14, Castres limbered up for the Heineken Cup trip to Belfast with an impressive 16-13 defeat of Clermont last weekend in which their South African scrum-half Rory Kockott scored 11 points to extend his lead as the league’s top points scorer this season. Depressingly, however, there are signs suggesting Castres have already decided to focus their limited resources on the domestic league. Three of last week’s back division are rested for the trip to Ulster including fly-half Rémi Talès.RACING METRO v Munster, pool 1Beaten in their last two matches and lying seventh in the table, Racing Metro are once more failing to live up to their reputation. Last week’s home defeat to Montpellier was particularly painful and led coach Gonzalo Quesada to answer questions about his future. One ray of hope for Racing lies in new recruit Olly Barkley. The former Bath fly-half made his first appearance for his new club as a second-half sub and could well start on Saturday at the Stade de France. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Castres’ South African number 9 Rory Kockott passes the ball during the French Top 14 rugby union match Montpellier vs Castres on September 29, 2012 at the Yves du Manoir stadium in Montpellier, southwestern France. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/GettyImages) CLERMONT v Scarlets, pool 5Clermont suffered only their second reverse of the season last week away at Castres, a defeat that leaves them third in the Top 14. Unbeaten at home for three years, Clermont have nonetheless failed to dominate teams on their home patch the way they once did. Racing lost by a solitary point and Stade Francais were edged out a fortnight ago by a 79th minute drop goal from Brock James. Coach Vern Cotter knows they’ll have to improve against the Scarlets, saying this week: “They’re a team of internationals crammed with talent. After their successful start to the season they’re going to arrive full of confidence.”Harlequins  v BIARRITZ, pool 3Biarritz are in crisis. Without a win in their last four matches, Biarritz were beaten at home by Bayonne in the Basque derby a fortnight ago and last week suffered a humiliating 36-9 mauling at the hands of Toulon. If that wasn’t depressing enough, the latest medical bulletin on talismanic No8 Imanol Harinordoquy announced he’s still some way off playing his first match of the season. With experienced internationals Jerome Thion and Dimitri Yachvili also out injured, Biarritz travel to London low on morale. “We’re going to play in another tournament and we have to find the positive things to help us regroup,” Serge Milhas after the Toulon hammering. TOULOUSE v Leicester, pool 2 On the surface Toulouse go into the Heineken Cup bang on form. The reigning French champions have won their last three matches, including a 32-9 defeat of Toulon a fortnight ago. But that that was a second-string Toulon side and the manner of last week’s 34-32 win over second from bottom Bordeaux-Begles illustrated the weaknesses in this Toulouse squad. Early in the second-half they trailed Bordeaux 29-10 and only a late surge, coupled with an exhausted opposition, saw Toulouse home. Defeats to Biarritz and Perpignan have shown Guy Noves squad is far from infallible and vice-captain Jean Bouilhou knows they will have to up their game against Leicester. Speaking in the aftermath of the win against Bordeaux he said: “If we play [against Leicester] the way we did tonight then it’s going to be very, very unpleasant. We’ve been warned.”last_img read more

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Six Nations: Five things we learnt – France v Scotland

first_imgA makeshift team will struggle against whichever Wales turns up, making the possibility of the renaissance turning into a false dawn more quickly that I can mix metaphors.And as for discipline: we’ll never forget Stuart Hogg’s red card last year in Cardiff. It still haunts Scotland fans. Okay, trusting in youth has its problemsOn these pages, in the autumn, I banged on about youth being given its head and flourishing as a result. Yes, back then the young Scots did come off fairly positively against the “best team in the world” (B version) and thump two other decent sides, but this was an introduction to the fire of the Six Nations and perhaps a truer reflection of where they are, at international level.Dougie Fife gave away a silly penalty when throwing away the ball, and there was a general lack of nous to change things up in the face of an onslaught from France. In the second half Scotland should have kept the ball, kicked less and looked to offload rather than go into contact where they were being smothered by Bernard le Roux and Thierry Dusautoir.Would it have worked? Debateable, but the game was there for the winning. There were things to take heart from: Finn Russell and Mark Bennett looked to the manor born, facing a hostile crowd of 75,000 in an arena like the Stade de France for the first time.There’s life in Euan Murray yetAt the other end of the career spectrum, the tighthead put in a vintage performance, winning scrum penalties and giving his opposite number a torrid time in the loose, meaning that France were substituting props as early as half time.He was also unusually prominent in the loose, showing some soft hands for Fife’s try, and tackling everything he could. The downside is his religious views prevent him from having a pop at the Welsh scrum next Sunday. Geoff Cross will be an able deputy, but it is great to see Murray hitting form again.Preparing for contact: Euan MurrayIf Scotland can sort the discipline they’d become very hard to beatWith a semi-decent scrum, a far better lineout and a miserly defence in the face of much bigger attacking runners – one that conceded no points when a man down – what let Scotland down was their discipline. Without the disciplinary lapses, that French wouldn’t have been in the game at half time nor in the lead during the closing stages. Scotland played all the rugby.Fife won’t be throwing dead balls away in a hurry ever again, but everyone really needs to switch on to whatever wavelength the referee is on at the breakdown and stick to it religiously. Which brings us to…Securing their own quick ball is still a problemScotland can live off scraps, but to get the backs really firing they need quicker ball. The French positioning at the breakdown was excellent, while Scottish players struggled to clear the opposition out quickly enough and were much less consistent with their body positions over the ball. Scots ball was secure and the opposition’s slow when Blair Cowan was on, and much less so when he was off briefly in the second half.Someone needs to throw some of that BT sponsorship money at luring Richie Gray (the other one, founder of GSI, Springbok breakdown consultant and former coach of Gala) back from South Africa to help the Scottish boys out.Busy, busy boy: Blair Cowan carriesWales will be a challengeWith the Welsh a traditional bogey team in recent years, and generally excellent in the speed of their breakdown work, next Sunday represents a tough test. With Murray out, a potential hip injury to Tommy Seymour (Scotland’s most in form back), and knocks to Alex Dunbar and Bennett too, the fear is that Scotland cannot put out the obvious first choice back division to make the most of the pack’s hard work. Try time: Dougie Fife goes over for the only try of the game against France center_img Scotland ran France close, playing all the rugby but just missing a few bounces. But what did we learn? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Rugby sevens spotlight on: Seabelo Senatla

first_imgBlitzbokke flyer Seabelo Senatla is the most lethal finisher in sevens rugby, scoring an incredible 157 tries in 144 matches on the HSBC Sevens World Series. Springboss: If Allister Coetzee asks Senatla to play in The Rugby Championship, he will Having been at the Commonwealth games, I have an inkling of what it’ll be like to walk out at the stadium in Rio. The Commonwealth Games in 2014 (in Glasgow) was one of my best experiences ever, so thinking about being an Olympian is crazy. It gives me goosebumps. It’s huge. As an athlete, it can’t get better than being at an Olympics.I’m comfortable with my decision to put my 15s ambitions on hold for the moment. It’s been the right decision. Playing 15s for the Springboks has been my dream since I took up rugby seriously and it still is, but when I heard that sevens was going to be part of the Olympics my vision changed. I’m a contracted sevens Bok until the end of the year and my plan after the Olympics is to return to 15s and focus on that. but if Bok coach Allister Coetzee calls me up for the Rugby Championship after Rio, of course I’d love to play. It might be too soon but I would jump at it. Carlin Isles and Perry Baker are quick. Carlin would probably win a race between us, but Perry and I would be neck and neck. I’m not really bothered that I’m not the fastest man on the circuit, though, because sevens is not only about speed; it’s about positioning and how you read the game and so many other aspects. Having speed is an advantage but sevens rugby is not all about that. you have to have so many other skills to be the complete rugby player.It would be great to watch a football match in Brazil. Or go to the famous beaches and see some of the history of the country. Obviously that will have to wait until after the sevens in Rio is finished.I’m not even thinking about the Zika virus. My mother is stressing about it too much, but I keep reassuring her that we are receiving medical information from our doctors. And I’m just focused on the rugby. I’ve always wanted to go to the Olympics. As a young athlete at school, I dreamt of running at the Olympics and now I have the chance as a rugby player, which is amazing. There have been sacrifices along the way but going to the Olympics makes it worth it. Blitzbokke: Seabelo Senatla clocked a 10.6 second 100m as a 17-year-oldcenter_img I have total belief in myself. Once I put my mind to something and get my head around the challenge I usually achieve it. If I had pursued sprinting as a career, I believe I’d have been somewhere in that discipline today. I’m addicted to getting better – progress is my addiction. I would have cut it if I had chosen that path.I ran against Wayde van Niekerk at U17 level. It was in the Free State Championships and in the 200m I came second to him (the current world 400m champion and the only man in history to break 10 seconds in the 100m, 20 seconds in the 200m and 44 seconds in the 400m).My first memory of the Olympics was watching Marion Jones win the 100m and 200m in Sydney in 2000. I was really young but something about Marion shocked me, in a good way, and I became addicted to running and trying to be like her. After her races I went outside and ran around the garden imitating her. I now watch the Olympics religiously and I also follow the Diamond League closely because athletics is still very close to my heart.“Once I put my mind to something I usually achieve it. Progress is my addiction” But it’s not just sheer pace that has taken him to the top of the sevens game – he has a maniac work ethic and drive to make it to Rio. If it wasn’t for rugby, he might well be at the Olympics as a specialist sprinter – he clocked 10.6 seconds in the 100m aged 17 without any specialist training. But life has led him down a different path to being a rugby star and he couldn’t be happier…It’s crazy – I’ve scored well over 100 tries in two seasons. I suppose it looks like try-scoring comes easy to me but a lot of it has to do with the way the team’s structures get me into space. I play with so many talented players and their amazing playmaking skills always put me into good positions. I also put in the hard work – doing speed and sprint drills and other skills. It has been paying off, and that in turn encourages me to work that little bit harder and put in some extra effort.I’m lucky because I was born with speed, but I still have to do speed work in training all the time. I live by the philosophy that ‘a skill that isn’t practised is a skill you lose’. Speed is no different and if you don’t work on it, you will lose it. Working hard on something like speed is not only to maintain it and improve it but also to keep your own confidence high. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here.last_img read more

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Exeter Chiefs tapping into new technology

first_img Exeter Chiefs tapping into new technologyTradition and technology – getting the balance right is crucial in all parts of life and sport is no exception. Take Exeter Chiefs.First the tradition. A day spent at Sandy Park in pre-season shows the exertions in the gym, the skills work and, of course, the obligatory mickey-taking.As Kai Horstmann emerges from the tunnel in a shirt and trousers as part of his new corporate role at the club having retired at the end of last season, there are calls from his former team-mates that he is needed on the pitch.Director of rugby Rob Baxter has players positioned along the two 10m lines in pods of three or four with his kickers on the middle of the halfway line for a restart drill. It’s a favourite for the end of a Wednesday session.The players are set a target of 15 successful catches from the kickers’ dropouts and a successful catch is a player being lifted by his pod and taking the ball above his head. Anything other than that doesn’t count.He can kick it: Henry Slade practises a restart (Getty Images)To make things more interesting, if a pod go for the lift and don’t catch the ball, Baxter will deduct one from the tally.Given the pleas that greet Hortsmann, it seems like they could do with his expertise on this particular Wednesday as it was an area he was renowned for, but the current crop are left to continue for another 20 minutes to reach the target.Now for the technology. There are examples dotted around – the GPS units in the back of shirts and the AlterG anti-gravity treadmill in the corner of the gym that uses NASA technology to allow players recovering from injury to train without their entire bodyweight putting strain on the joints.The biggest advancement for the Chiefs this season, though, comes on the top floor of the main stand in the shape of their new fitness analysis suite, launched in partnership with Red Bull.It is full of state-of-the-art equipment and gadgets to test players’ bodies in various areas and hopefully flag any causes for concern early to help prevent injuries. TAGS: Exeter Chiefs Group hug: The Exeter squad come together after a pre-season session (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Take a seat… The isokinetic dynamometer that assesses a player’s range of motionIn one corner there’s something that looks even more intimidating than a dentist’s chair – an isokinetic dynamometer. Players are strapped in and perform different exercises, like a leg raise for example, while the machine resists with a set force. If there is a significant difference between the results in the left and right legs, it may highlight a deficiency and the medical team can investigate further.In the centre of the room are plates that measure forces of a player running or jumping, and XSens MVN full-body suits allow the Chiefs to get 3D motion capture imagery instantaneously to examine a player’s movement. There’s also a counterweight treadmill as well as the mask needed to carry out VO2 max testing to measure aerobic capacity.Suits you: The XSens MVN suits allow full-body motion captureAll in all, there’s a lot of complex and intricate analysis done in the suite but the aim is simple: to keep players playing.“We want to keep players out on the field,” explains academy manager Rob Gibson. “We want to make use of the science and track players from a young age all the way through. We can build up a history and see if there are any weaknesses in a player’s body.”Chiefs are focusing on their academy players first so they can get baseline measurements and then track them throughout this season and beyond, but first-teamers will also go through the process.Chiefs have used this sort of equipment before but previously had to go to the University of Exeter to do so. Having everything on site is a huge advantage, says Pat Carden, Exeter’s sports performance scientist.High tech: The counterweight treadmill and other equipment in the new fitness suite“Before, testing was more of a challenge because you had to juggle schedules, but now it’s all here we can test a lot more people more frequently,” says Carden.“Rugby is so variable you can never predict injury, but we look for a series of different markers to allow us to be as informed as we can be. It’s not just one thing, there’s a comprehensive series of information – knee strength, rotational force, aerobic and anaerobic capacity… We might see a weakness on the left or right side, or a deficit potential that means there’s an injury risk.”It looks as though Exeter are striking that happy balance between tradition and technology as they prepare for the new Gallagher Premiership season. The Chiefs are gearing up for the 2018-19 Gallagher Premiership season by using a new fitness analysis suite Exeter Chiefs have launched a brand-new fitness analysis suite for their first-team and academy players in partnership with Red Bull.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup Semi-final: England 19-7 New Zealand

first_imgEngland are through to the World Cup final after a savage win over the All Blacks 2019 Rugby World Cup Semi-final: England 19-7 New ZealandHead-to-headPlayed – 42England wins – 8New Zealand wins – 33Draws – 1Did you know?England are into their fourth World Cup final.Kieran Read captained the All Blacks for the 51st time, equalling 1992-1997 All Blacks hooker Sean Fitzpatrick.It was also Read’s 34 birthday today.Tom Curry and Sam Underhill are the youngest flankers to ever start together in a Rugby World Cup knockout match, averaging 22 years and 107 days.Ben Youngs and George Ford played together at nine and ten for the 33rd time for England – a high for England in the pro era.In a nutshellEngland are into the Rugby World Cup final after physically hammering and smothering the All Blacks.Within the 19-7 win, the men in white dominated the turnover count, taking ball off New Zealand 16 times while the All Blacks only managed to snaffle it five times.The defence was brutal and the All Blacks seemed shell-shocked for large parts of the game. Both teams got one try each, but while England’s was borne of front-foot ball and power running, New Zealand could only profit off one loose ball to score theirs and spent large parts of the game giving away penalties (11 to New Zealand to England’s six, in the end).Manu Tuilagi scored the first try from a rare pick and go before the two-minute mark – according to Opta, it was the quickest the All Blacks have conceded in their World Cup history.It all came from relentless, quick phases and the team thundered forward as Elliot Daly set Anthony Watson free up the touchline. Wave after wave of England runners came in and with Mako Vunipola dragging them ahead, then Courtney Lawes carrying to within a foot, the centre simply picked and dived. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TRY!98 secondsThat @EnglandRugby fast start and it’s Manu Tuilagi who drives overWhat a start!#CarryThemHome #ITVRugby #RWC2019 #ENGvNZL pic.twitter.com/czTlEo5VhN— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) October 26, 2019Energised by the lightning-quick start, England began creating those turnovers. George Ford was ripping ball and momentum came at the breakdown. Maro Itoje was a constant menace, taking the ball out of Kieran Read’s hands and then swallowing it at an All Blacks maul, and Tom Curry grew in stature throughout the half, pinching it when the All Blacks were finally getting their act together.England almost feasted off an interception too as Tuilagi intercepted a telegraphed Beauden Barrett pass and fed Owen Farrell, who quickly slipped it to Jonny May. He was eventually forced to cut inside by a corner-flagging Scott Barrett, and the pop to support was a dropped mess.Related: The making of Kyle SincklerEddie Jones’s side had a try ruled out for crossing as Kyle Sinckler let Tom Curry run a line and then slipped the ball to Sam Underhill, who went over unimpeded. New Zealand clung on.Yet in the running skirmishes to come, the English forwards made more telling steals. Owen Farrell was not quite at 100%, spending some points limping but still throwing himself at the game as hard as possible. A long-range penalty on the stroke of half-time was left to Ford to take. He sent it over to make the score 10-0 at the break.The fear at this stage was, was it enough? The All Blacks have rope-a-doped teams before… Clearly their experiment with Scott Barrett at six didn’t work and Sam Cane came on at half-time. Still, England had another penalty in the Kiwi 22.Points on the board: Ardie Savea scores New Zealand’s try from a lineout malfunction (Getty Images)With the angle unfavourable, they kicked to the corner. From the lineout England held it in and as All Blacks defenders drifted with Youngs and his backs, the scrum-half threw a half-dummy and slid through the gap to score. Or at least he thought he did. In the maul, the ball had been fumbled.It’s normally at this juncture of a match you say to yourself, “It would be mad to write New Zealand off, even 13 points ahead.” And it looked like that bounce back could be on. Picking off a loose Jamie George lineout, Savea only had to catch it, take a few steps and spring over for a try that was converted by Richie Mo’unga. This is how their surges normally begin.Related: Preview of Wales v South AfricaBut nothing stops momentum like a thundercrack tackle and Underhill led the way back to the scoreboard as he obliterated Beauden Barrett, making him drop the ball. England started rolling hits together, with Itoje slamming into Sam Whitelock too and the team went marching back onto the front foot. New Zealand never found their way back again.Ford would kick another penalty as Read was warned that the All Blacks were racking up too many infringements. They were sent scrambling and England were happy to let them play away in their own half. It was as emphatic a win as 19-7 can really ever be.We now wait to see who will face the English in the final.Brutal: Maro Itoje, named Man of the Match, smashes into Anton Lienert-Brown (Getty Images)Star manMaro Itoje put in a display of World Cup savagery. He blew apart All Blacks plays, inhaled turnovers and brought relentless energy. He made three turnovers and won seven lineouts.He can play on the edge – and he showed that around the 50-minute mark, as the All Blacks began coming back, when he gave away a penalty coming in from the side and lifted Ardie Savea’s leg – but you need his spoiling. And that can be a big positive when he backs himself to do something destructive.In the 65th minute, he put a play-halting hit on Sam Whitelock after shooting out the line on halfway. The regular deputy to Read was subbed off two minutes later.Itoje was rightly named Man of the Match.Unique line-up: England stood in a V shape to face New Zealand’s pre-match haka (Getty Images)The verdictEngland coach Eddie Jones: “We played against a great team today – Steve Hansen is a great coach, Kieran Read is a great captain and we had to dig deep. We knew we had to come off the line hard and keep taking away time and space and we managed to do that, cause a few errors and we maybe had a few lucky bounces and got the result.”All Blacks coach Steve Hansen: “First of all I would like to congratulate England, they played a tremendous game of footy and on the day deserved to win the game. You can’t give them half a step because they’ll take it and, at the end of the day, that’s what rugby is about and well done to them.“I’m really proud of our team, they have done a tremendous job for their country and just tonight we weren’t good enough, so we have to take that on the chin and so does everybody back home, our fans – all credit to England.“You saw the boys, at the end they were still trying their guts out and that’s all you can ask, so I’m really proud of them. And thanks to Japan for a wonderful, wonderful tournament, really appreciate it.”The teamsEngland: Elliot Daly; Anthony Watson, Manu Tuilagi (Jonathan Joseph 74), Owen Farrell (capt), Jonny May (Henry Slade 44); George Ford, Ben Youngs (Willi Heinz 63); Mako Vunipola (Joe Marler 70), Jamie George (Luke Cowan-Dickie 70), Kyle Sinckler (Dan Cole 46), Maro Itoje, Courtney Lawes (George Kruis), Tom Curry, Sam Underhill (Mark Wilson 70), Billy Vunipola.Try: Tuilagi 2. Con: Farrell. Pens: Ford 4 (40, 49, 63, 69).New Zealand: Beauden Barrett; Sevu Reece, Jack Goodhue (Sonny Bill Williams 55), Anton Lienert-Brown, George Bridge (Jordie Barrett 50); Richie Mo’unga, Aaron Smith (TJ Perenara 55); Joe Moody (Ofa Tuungafasi 63), Codie Taylor (Dane Coles 50), Nepo Laulala (Angus Ta’avao 53), Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock (Patrick Tuipulotu 67), Scott Barrett (Sam Cane 40), Ardie Savea, Kieran Read (capt).Try: Savea 57. Con: Mo’unga. Lightning strike: Manu Tuilagi scores after two minutes (Getty Images) Keep track of events in Japan via our Rugby World Cup homepage.Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Molly Wright banned for three weeks

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. She will miss Scotland’s remaining two Six Nations matches against Italy on Saturday 17 April and their play-off final the following weekend. The final match of the ban will be determined when club fixtures resume in Scotland  – Wright plays for Watsonians – or another meaningful match is scheduled, whichever comes first.The Women’s Six Nations continues this weekend with defending champions England travelling to Parma to play Italy. Wales, who lost 53-0 to France in their opening match, host Ireland in Cardiff in their second fixture.The condensed format this year means each country plays two group matches before a finals day on 24 April when teams face the nation ranked in the same position in the opposite pool. Molly Wright (right) will miss the rest of the Women’s Six Nations (Getty Images) Molly Wright banned for three weeksMolly Wright will miss the rest of the Women’s Six Nations after being banned for three weeks.The Scotland hooker was sent off for a high tackle on Vickii Cornborough in the 64th minute of the 52-10 defeat by England in the opening round of the championship.Wright appeared before an independent disciplinary committee charged with infringing Law 9.13  (Dangerous Tackle. A player must not tackle an opponent early, late or dangerously. Dangerous tackling includes, but is not limited to, tackling or attempting to tackle an opponent above the line of the shoulders even if the tackle starts below the line of the shoulders.).She accepted that she had committed an act of foul play and that it warranted a red card, and the disciplinary committee determined that it was a mid-range offence with an entry point of a six-week ban.Wright was given the maximum 50% mitigation as she accepted the charge, showed remorse and had a clean disciplinary record, so she has been banned for three weeks.center_img The Scotland front-rower was sent off against England and will miss the rest of the Women’s Six Nations LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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TREC hopes to cast ‘bold vision,’ specific proposals

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments (2) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs December 6, 2013 at 9:16 pm Both at TREC’s meeting and at the recent WCC’s meeting there appears to have been little discussion of Pope Francis and the revolution he is beginning in the Roman Church. By his life of radical simplicity and dedication to serving the poor he brings a new spirit to Christian mission. It is by living the life of Christ that he recommends himself to people of all backgrounds and faiths. I believe we need that kind of inspiring leadership and example from our bishops, priests, and lay leaders. A new direction for the Church begins with a new spirit of simplicity and service, of true Christ-like humility and compassion. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Ven. Robert Franken, a member of the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church, shows the group a Wordle based on responses to the first question of the task force’s engagement process with the church. The question asks for Episcopalians to reflect on their experience of the church, choose their “very best memory” and express it in three words. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] By this time next year, the members of the Episcopal Church will have just recently learned what changes and plans the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church will recommend to the General Convention. However, between now and then, much work remains for the 26-member group, including what more than one member said is the need to connect specific proposals for change to a bold vision of what the churchwide structures can be and do.TREC’s work began after General Convention in July 2012, by way of Resolution C095, which called for a task force “to present the 78th General Convention with a plan for reforming the church’s structures, governance, and administration.” The task force is due to make public its report to General Convention in late 2014.Katy George, who shares the work on convening the task force with the Rev. Craig Loya, told the group at the beginning of its Dec. 6-7 meeting here at the Maritime Institute, outside of Baltimore, that many task force members have expressed the feeling that “we’d like to step it up and really make sure that we are producing something fantastic.”George told the group that she thinks it will be important for the task force to not just list its recommendations in its final report but to explain to the church “our holistic vision for how we’re hoping that the church moves in a new direction as a networked facilitator actually, as opposed to a corporation.”And, she said, the group must be able to “really bring to life to the church how [the group’s proposals] will change how we spend our resources, how we spend our time, how we make decisions, we work together on mission.”Council member Tom Little seemed to anticipate the path of discussion for the rest of the morning session when he suggested that as the group considers specific proposals “we may end up tweaking the vision.”Engaging with the engagement processThe members spent most of the Dec. 6 morning session, which was open to the public, discussing what they have heard from its “church engagement process” thus far. The group developed an “engagement kit,” which was posted on its website in mid-October. It is downloadable in English or Spanish as a PDF or PowerPoint here and includes overviews, guidelines for engagement, facilitator’s notes, charts and other material.The kit is meant for use at any local, diocesan, or churchwide gathering and anyone can lead the discussions it prompts and report the results to the task force. There is also an opportunity for online engagement, which is a series of four questions.The kit is meant to help the task force hear from Episcopalians about “the memories, hopes and dreams” that they have for the church, according to the group’s website. The deadline for submitting information is March 14.Nearly 190 groups and individuals have responded to the four online questions, sometimes with lengthy comments. All of those comments are posted just below the explanation of the engagement kit at the link above. More responses have come to the task force via other methods, putting the total number of responses somewhere between 260 and 280, according to the Ven. Robert Franken, who along with the Rev. Leng Lim, led the task force through a lengthy multi-part discussion of the responses received thus far.The task force needs more input, Franken said, because the response to date “gives us a picture but it doesn’t yet give us the whole picture, and we want to make sure that the picture we’re getting is the right picture.”Few of the task force members have answered the four online questions, according to a show of hands. And not all who have facilitated groups who used the engagement kit have supplied the results to the task force, Franken said.“Where’s the data, folks?” Franken asked his colleagues.Yet, many task force members who have used the engagement kit with groups reported having profound experiences.When Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania Bishop Sean Rowe used the process during a diocesan convention, “I couldn’t get people to stop talking,” he said.The Rev. Kevin Nichols said he began using the engagement kit in his congregation, including with the confirmation class. “Every group was trying to go deeper spiritually by using the images that were presented,” he said. “I worried at first that maybe it was a little be too simplistic – that our questions weren’t grand enough – but with each group I felt like it went to a depth that I didn’t even imagine.”Members of the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church begin Dec. 6 to study input from the church at the beginning or their two-day meeting at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceDuring the Dec. 6 session, the members found some suggested ways of changing the churchwide structures as they considered some of the verbatim comments as well as summaries of all the input the task force has received. They also heard some general and specific suggestions from each other.Those proposals were presented to them as “teaser,” in Leng’s words, rather than formal proposals.“As a church predisposed to legislation, when someone says something, we think ‘Oh, my gosh, am I on board on this or not; is this a recommendation I can support?’ [and] then we go down the track of voting,” he cautioned. “We actually putting out ideas for you to test, to try on; we’re not asking you to buy, we’re really asking you to rent …we are trusting that something is going to unfold.”Joan Delano, a consultant to the task force who works with the ClearLake Group as does Leng, summarized the input received thus far and she noted “a powerful sense of the importance of the liturgy, ritual, tradition and history” in the comments. “The strength of the mysticism theme was intriguing,” she added.One question in the process asks “what do you think is the one thing The Church should hold on to and the one thing it could let go?” Delano, who was ill and could not be at the meeting, reported that the “hold on to” responses “were overwhelming about the spiritual side” of the Episcopal Church and the “let go” responses “were overwhelming about administration and governance.”“The respondents overwhelmingly want to cut the bureaucracy and the administrative burden,” she wrote. “My reflection is that being in control consumes a lot of resources, and that people sense how much resource could be freed up if TEC invested less in governance and administration.”While Delano reported finding few comments from people with an “obvious ax to grind,” the Rev. Marianne Ell said her small group of task force members sensed “some real hatefulness, and passive-aggressiveness and taking a shot at things” in some of the answers to the let-go question.George told the group that her experience with the task force has caused her to come to “a very different framing of the problem” facing the church. She came onto the task force, she said, believing that the church’s process was “way too big – expensive, big, unwieldy – and that as forcing our ‘product,’ our mission to be way too small.”In fact, she said, very little money overall is spent on governance and administration and “actually all the mission is being done elsewhere.”“So, what I see is that we have a small process and we’re cranking out too little product with it because we’re not engaging and empowering the whole church,” she said. “So, our job is not about ‘let’s cut down process;’ it’s ‘let’s re-imagine the process to make bigger product.’”Diocese of El Camino Real Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves said the church’s “greatest asset” is the people in the pews “and what we’ve done is we’ve said the creative asset should run through this thing called the CCABs [the church’s committees, commissions, agencies and boards] and that’s the lie that’s perpetuated in this hierarchal system.”George agreed, saying “the point is it’s not about cutting down our bureaucracy, it’s about rethinking it so that it naturally has a very different role; that’s the radical shift that I think we need to make.”The rest of the meeting’s agendaThe group met privately during the afternoon of Dec. 6 and was scheduled to begin discussing possible proposals and to hear from a subcommittee on the constitutional and canonical implications of any of those proposals. TREC’s half-day session on Dec. 7 will be open. During that session, George said, the group will decide its next steps, including how to begin to draft its report to the church. The task force expects to issue a statement to the church about this meeting early in the week of Dec. 8, Loya told Episcopal News Service.TREC’s Facebook page is here and it is here on Twitter with @ReimagineTEC, where the group is using #reimaginetec. The task force tweeted periodically throughout the morning of Dec. 6, summarizing what the members were working on.ENS coverage of the initial work of TREC is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Comments are closed. Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 6, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Structure, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET December 9, 2013 at 10:08 pm As slowly as change has come to TEC, I’d like to see us refrain from dismissing Francis as simply a delightful man. I believe he’s calling the Church — the whole Church, not just his own branch of the Church, to renewed commitment to Jesus, to really, truly and passionately to follow the One we call the Christ, identifying as he did with those who have been made poor and those who are oppressed by our all too human systems governed as they are by the “principalities and powers” of greed and evil. Rector Washington, DC TREC hopes to cast ‘bold vision,’ specific proposals Input suggests keeping spiritual aspects, letting go of bureaucracy Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Nancy Mott says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

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Video: Mozambique partnership addresses malaria, intense flooding

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Video: Mozambique partnership addresses malaria, intense flooding Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Africa, Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Video Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 17, 2014 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal News Service] With picture postcard landscapes, rich agricultural possibilities, and a people committed to a sustainable future, Mozambique is a place of great beauty and potential.But intense seasonal flooding, periodic droughts and the burden of malaria and other communicable diseases continue to bring suffering to much of the population.Responding to these crises and encouraging sustainability has been the focus of Anglican Social Action (ASA), the relief and development arm of the Diocese of Lebombo.Episcopal Relief & Development has partnered with ASA through the malaria prevention program NetsforLife®, community development initiatives, and in responding to the immediate impact and long-term recovery from flooding disasters.This video is also featured here as part of Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75 stories over 75 weeks project to celebrate the agency’s 75th anniversary. The 75-week celebration will continue through the end of 2015.Another video report about how this partnership fosters sustainable livelihoods is available here and below. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Episcopal Relief & Development, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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Jefferts Schori’s address at Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75th anniversary…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC General Convention, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Jefferts Schori’s address at Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75th anniversary celebration This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska [Episcopal News Service — Salt Lake City] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori speaks at Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75th anniversary celebration June 27 at General Convention in Salt Lake City. Submit a Press Release Video Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Relief & Development, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR General Convention 2015, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Jun 28, 2015 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

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