ND continues renovations

first_imgThe Stadium renovations have been ongoing for the past four summers and will be completed next summer. Affleck-Graves said the University is currently in fundraising mode for several large projects and they are close to closing the funding on the Executive Education Center.“That will probably be the next big project we do,” he said. At this time the University has no plans to demolish any buildings on campus, including Stepan Center. “We will do the last phase of that next summer,” he said. The University is also planning on erecting a social sciences building, a multidisciplinary research building, two new dorms and a student activity center as part of the long-term strategic plan. “I think we will continue to use Stepan,” Affleck-Graves said. “Stepan is actually a quite well-used building on campus.” The University also did landscaping work after a storm in June felled several trees along Notre Dame Avenue. “Over the summer we completely renovated Stanford and Keenan — redid the bathrooms, changed some of the room layouts, repainted it,” Affleck-Graves said.Affleck-Graves said the University also completed a $15 million renovation of the old Law School building and continued working on updating Notre Dame Stadium.  Affleck-Graves said the University is also working on a cancer research center called Harper Hall that will be part of the Indiana University — South Bend Medical School.The University also worked on some smaller renovation projects over the summer including making changes to Stanford, Keenan and Lewis. “We take out all the seats we repair the concrete and we seal it,” he said. “So that project went ahead this summer and we will be ready for football season.” The University’s policy is not to begin construction on any project until 100 percent of the funds have been pledged by donors. The policy helped save the University from having a handful of half-completed projects during the economic downturn. “We lost some big trees in a storm in June, so we continue to plant trees,” Affleck-Graves said. “Everything is continuing that is funded,” he said.  “There would be some spaces for clubs to have meeting rooms but there would also be a big open space,” he said. Affleck-Graves said the student activity center would be “kind of a mix between Stepan and LaFortune.”  However, in the long-term, Stepan “will probably have to come down” because of problems the University has had with the roof and other structural issues, Affleck-Graves said. Construction on a number of buildings around campus — including a new ice hockey arena and the Institute for Educational Initiatives — went as planned this summer, and the University expects to complete the projects on time, Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves said.“Those are the two buildings that have gone really well,” he said.Affleck-Graves said he expected the hockey rink to be completed in October 2011, while the Institute for Educational Initiatives is “well underway” and will be finished in April 2010.last_img read more

Read More →

Dayne sticks to charity

first_imgActivities at Rolfs Sports Recreation Center were in full force Friday, but Center Court One was temporarily out of commission. Irish quarterback Dayne Crist was taped to the east wall with purple, pink, blue and even cheetah tape. “Donate to Duct Tape Dayne” was the hook that drew Notre Dame students, faculty and staff to Rolfs Sports Recreation Center to a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event. RecSports partnered with Relay for Life to raise both awareness and funding for the event. “I wanted to do something truly different,” Lana Wright, Relay for Life committee member and event coordinator, said. “Think outside the box. That’s my motto.” The idea for the event was a product of an online search for a unique and innovative fundraising idea, she said. Wright said she needed a duct-tape victim who was not only willing, but that would draw attention. She aimed high and sought out Crist. “I was more than happy to be a part of such a great cause,” Crist said. “One way or another we have all been affected by cancer, and I am glad that I can be a part of something that is so personal for so many people.” Although he did not know exactly what he would be doing for the fundraiser, Crist said he did not try to scramble out of the commitment when he learned he was going to be duct-taped. “It didn’t change my mind,” he said. “It’s for such a great cause.” Crist smiled, laughed and shouted at friends who were playing basketball or running around the track in an effort to get more participants. Friends, students and others gathered to immobilize Crist. RecSports was an active participant in the fundraiser. Not only did its staff coordinate the event in conjunction with the Relay for Life Committee, but RecSports interns remained still as donors threw pies at their faces. Wright said their official goal was to raise $1,000. Donations ranged according to what each participant wanted to do, with $3 to duct-tape Crist and $1 to pie an intern. In addition to these interactive donation activities, participants were also encouraged to purchase luminaries, Peyton Pops or the iconic wristbands. Each donor was then asked to sign a commemorative board that will be donated to Relay for its silent auction. The Notre Dame Relay for Life Committee recognizes the growing relevance of cancer in the lives of its students, faculty, staff and community, Wright said. The members are proud to participate and hope that, together with the American Cancer Society, they can help create a world with less cancer and more birthdays, their website said. Relay for Life will take place from April 29-30 at Notre Dame, Wright said. The exact campus location of the Relay has yet to be determined.last_img read more

Read More →

Professor researches violence

first_imgWhile working in Northern Ireland over the past six years, Dr. Mark Cummings’ research team found that political violence affects the way families function, which in turn causes behavioral and mental health problems in children. The team’s research was published on “Child Development’s” website and will run in a future issue of the journal, according to a Feb. 8 University press release. Cummings, chair of the psychology department, said he first became interested in the conflict in Northern Ireland while he was a Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies fellow. “I became interested in exploring the impact of political violence on families and children as a way to better understand possibility for peace process,” he said. “If you understand those pathways, then you understand more about how you might remediate problems by first understanding what the problems are at that level.” In conducting the research, Cummings and his team worked with faculty living in Northern Ireland. The researchers from Northern Ireland conducted all the interviews, he said. “When we started, the children were between 10 and 15,” he said. “Now we are on our sixth year studying approximately 1,000 families in Belfast.” Mothers and children were interviewed and filled out a survey to assess the different measures of political violence they encountered, Cummings said. “We developed measures of sectarian community violence and non-sectarian community violence,” he said. “We assessed interparental conflict, family conflict and parenting, especially parents control over children’s behavior.” Cummings said the researchers were also examining the emotional security of their participants, as well as the children’s adjustments. Through interviews and surveys, the research team found that political violence, specifically that of Northern Ireland’s political and religious divisions, affects family units, which in turn affects children. “This violence increases conflict between parents, increases family conflict, and that increases insecurity that children have about their communities and their families,” he said. “And that leads directly to them having problems with depression, aggression, anxiety.” The team has also found that social identity matters in this conflict. “We’ve found that kids identity as Catholic or Protestant also factors in,” he said. The identification as Catholic or Protestant can be both an indicator of youth resilience and risk, he said. Cummings said that, while he and his team have only studied one area, their results could be generalized to a certain extent. “We do think that every society would be different, but different levels of society effect children,” he said. “Children’s emotional security about their community, their culture and their family’s matter to their adjustment.” Cummings said this research would also help understand youth and how political violence affects them everywhere, not just in Northern Ireland.last_img read more

Read More →

Transfer students join Notre Dame family

first_imgSophomore transfer student Allie Gerspach felt her freshman year at the University of Miami was missing something. “I wanted to be at a school with more school spirit,” she said. “It wasn’t really a close-knit community.” The promise of Notre Dame’s lively spirit, along with its stellar academics, prompted Gerspach to apply to transfer. This year, Notre Dame welcomes 141 transfer students, the largest class in recent years. While the majority of the transfer class consists of sophomores, a number of juniors will be arriving as well. Office of Undergraduate Admissions Assistant Director Erin Camilleri, who oversees transfer admissions, said this year’s class comes from a variety of backgrounds. “They’re coming from top-tier research institutions, they’re coming from flagship state schools and they’re coming from small liberal arts schools,” she said. The students’ intended majors are just as varied. Camilleri said the University admitted transfer students to the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Science, Engineering and the School of Architecture. Transfer students are not admitted to Mendoza College of Business because the college is already overenrolled, Camilleri said. One challenge transfer students often face is finding housing. If they apply for on-campus housing, transfer students are placed on a waitlist along with readmitted students and those who previously lived off campus and are trying to move back into a dorm. Jeffrey Shoup, director of Residence Life and Housing, said the office housed all 80 men on this year’s waitlist, but only 42 of the 79 women. “We typically have more males cancel their housing every year than female cancels,” he said. “We also changed a few rooms around in Morissey, Zahm and Dillon [residence halls]. We added a few beds in hopes to make some more space.” Shoup said the University assigns students lottery numbers to decide who will be given on-campus housing. Administrators also try to assist the students they are not able to provide housing for by directing them to a Facebook page and a resource site. “With the Facebook page they talk to each other about looking for roommates,” he said. “Then they use the resource page to figure out who to call to find different apartments or complexes that are taking students.” Gerspach said she was nervous about finding housing before she found out she would be living in Welsh Family Hall this year. “I was told it was really rare that people would get on campus as transfers,” she said. “But I lucked out, I got number three in the lottery.” Although she has cousins and a few friends who attend Notre Dame, Gerspach said she has mixed emotions about starting at a new school as a sophomore. “I’m excited definitely, but I’m nervous too,” she said. “It’s kind of starting all over again in a way, meeting new people and everything.”last_img read more

Read More →

Chorale to perform sacred, patriotic works in concert

first_imgThe Notre Dame Chorale, the University’s official concert choir, will perform its annual fall concert at 8 p.m. Friday in DeBartolo Performing Arts Center’s Leighton Concert Hall. The theme of the concert is “God, Country, Notre Dame.”“The concert will feature sacred works (God), patriotic songs (country) and school songs (Notre Dame) in addition to Irish airs and the Scottish song ‘Loch Lomond,’” Chorale director Alexander Blachly said. “There will also be a special feature of the program with the participation of the newly-formed Notre Dame Children’s Choir.”Blachly said the repertoire of the group ranges from Gregorian chants, Renaissance motets and classical pieces to more contemporary works. Staff pianist Paivi Ekroth will accompany the choir’s vocals.The show, which will last approximately one hour with no intermission, celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Chorale and kicks off a weekend-long Chorale alumni reunion.“This is a celebration of the past members of the Chorale,” Blachly said.”The reunion will continue the next day after the concert with singing activities in Leighton Concert Hall and a visit to the DPAC organ hall.”Senior Mimi Michuda, Chorale president, said she appreciates the emotion and excitement surrounding the reunion.“Chorale is more than just close friendships, we are a family,” she said.Junior Erin Bishop, Chorale treasurer, said the concert will feature many changes from of the past performances.“The officers and myself have worked really hard with Alex [Blachly] to revamp our concerts and to hopefully increase attendance,” she said. “This concert, we’re singing a much greater variety of pieces, especially with the more modern patriotic and school songs.”Blachly said the Chorale has about 50 members, both male and female, most of whom are undergraduate students representing every college. Besides the fall concert, the Chorale also performs Handel’s Messiah with the Notre Dame Festival Orchestra each December, embarks on a winter tour each January and travels for an international tour every three or four years. The Chorale has also performed with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra, and the group will participate in a performance of Mendelssohn’s Elijah next March.“Many students do not know about Chorale because there are many other choirs on campus that sing much more modern music,” Bishop said. “We want people to know that we’re here as well and just as great of a group.”Tickets for the fall concert are free for students and $10 for the general public. They can be purchased at the DPAC box office or online at performingarts.nd.eduTags: Alexander Blachly, Chorale Fall Concert, DPAC, God Country Notre Dame, leighton concert hall, The Notre Dame Choralelast_img read more

Read More →

Panel explores interfaith peace building efforts

first_imgA group of international peacemakers convened in McKenna Hall Wednesday night to share their experiences and reflect on the reality of peace building during a panel discussion sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.The panel, titled “Peace is Always Possible: Reflections from Proven Peacemakers,” brought together four panelists to discuss their experiences and insights in peacemaking as part of the fifth annual American Meeting of Sant’Egidio Prayer for Peace.A recurring theme throughout the panel was the importance of peacemaking and peace building as a goal religious leaders and communities should strive to achieve. Archbishop John Baptist Odama, one of the four panelists, said the pursuit of peace requires passion, love and commitment to the communities most affected by violence and conflict.“Peace is a mission given to us by God,” Odama said. “We must be loyal to the people because it is they who want peace.”Odama reflected on his time as a religious leader during the Northern Ugandan war of 1996, highlighting his efforts to unite communities and communicate with rebel groups, all while working toward a common goal.Panelists Miko Peled and Bassem al-Tamimi, Israeli and Palestinian peace activists respectively, discussed activism in the Palestinian conflict, providing insight into how their distinct positions of power and disadvantage within the conflict affected their efforts. Peled said after he became aware of the deeper complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and as people close to him disputed traditional Israeli ways, he found he could utilize his privilege as an Israeli Jew to promote his peace efforts.“In the reality that exists in Palestine and Israel, I’m privileged,” Peled said. “Even if I’m arrested, I know I’m going home at the end of the day.”Al-Tamimi, an activist and organizer in the West Bank, said his experience with grassroots resistance helped him understand the values necessary to bring about peace.“For me peace is the final state. … Without justice, freedom and equal rights, there is no peace. I hope that you can do something to protect the meaning of peace,”  he said.Panelist Laurie Johnson said her peacemaking experience with the small community of Sant’Egidio, an international Christian humanitarian group, was marked by a missionary ethos that influenced her ideas on peacemaking later on.“The community’s willingness to respond to help was the beginning of a four-year peace process,” Johnson said. “That theme of responding in friendship to the needs of the other is one that has played a role in virtually all of the community’s peace work.”Johnson also said peace building is an exercise that requires leaving one’s comfort zone and understanding the inherent responsibility of advocating in and believing in the possibility of peace.“I think that for all of us in this room today, really to say peace is possible is to take a kind of risk, because it requires us to move out of our ordinary resignation,” Johnson said. “Once you say peace is possible, you can’t say, ‘Oh well, nothing can be done about that situation’ or ‘Those people can’t change’ or ‘That situation is never going to get any better.’“Once you begin to say ‘peace is possible,’ … once you begin to dare to say that, then you have a responsibility,” Johnson said.Tags: activism, kroc institute for international studies, peace buildinglast_img read more

Read More →

Students present ideas at App Fair

first_imgEight teams of students presented various apps they designed and created as part of the Notre Dame App Club’s second annual App Fair on Wednesday night.Senior Nick Pellegrino, president of the App Club, said the event and the club came about last year as a means of drawing attention to students’ ideas and giving them an opportunity to develop these ideas.“The big thing that we were going for when we started was that we wanted to have an organization that would bring all these various side projects that students are working on into the main light,” he said. “Because a lot of people just do these projects on the side and don’t really get much credit or recognition for it, so our club was trying to bring that into the present.”The eight teams produced a variety of concepts, Pellegrino said, which ranged from an app to organize pickup sports games to a mental health support app.“We got quite a wide variety in terms of scope,” he said. “There are apps that are localized to the Notre Dame community, and then other ones that are trying to blow up into big businesses and stuff like that.”This creativity came as a result freedom given to the participants, Pellegrino said.“During the year, you might’ve heard about the ND App Challenge or these hack-a-thons … but the thing is, they’re all centered around a central theme or idea,” he said. “What I wanted with this event is just to have no theme or idea. I don’t want to have people directing their ideas toward something that I want to see or something like some sort of goal. Although they’re usually benevolent goals, at the end of the day I didn’t want to stifle that creativity.”The judges awarded first place — along with a $250 gift card — to the team made up of senior Jackson Jhin, junior John Joyce and junior Rob Simari. Their app, Float, is a “peer-to-peer insurance network” that connects people who purchase tickets to an event with a “backup” buyer in order to ensure a partial refund if the original purchaser is unable to attend the event.“Insurance, basically, on tickets right now is a scam,” Simari said. “So we wanted to provide an alternate way of doing that. … So we have an insurance buyer and a discount buyer.”While last year’s event gave each team a time slot to present their app in front of the fair’s judges and attendees, Pellegrino said the App Club wanted to allow for more hands-on judging this year with a science fair setup in which judges could test the apps themselves.“This time we wanted to have a much more fluid, kind of more dynamic [event and] have people kind of walk around, get a sense and feel from everybody here,” he said. “ … We just wanted something where people just come in, drop by for a minute if they wanted to, see what they want and go on with their schedules.”Pellegrino said he hopes all participants gained valuable insight from the process of creating an app and receiving feedback on their work.“The main point is just to get these students’ work out there and get some recognition — and also some good feedback,” he said. “We have a number of experienced entrepreneurs here, as well, so they’ve been offering feedback on … the projects.”Simari said he appreciates the opportunity to develop and present his app in front of his peers and experienced professionals.“People at Notre Dame are the people who have an itch to solve a problem,” he said. “I think that’s just who most of us are, and I think we’re always solving problems, but this is a way for us to show what we’ve done. I think that we’re already solving problems, but just giving us an avenue to speak to people in industry and get feedback is a really valuable experience. I think the App Club does exactly that.”Tags: App Club, App Fair, entrepreneurshiplast_img read more

Read More →

Panel unpacks the 2018 midterm elections

first_imgThe Center for Social Concerns’ ND Votes kicked off its first “Pizza, Pop and Politics” event of the semester Wednesday night in the Geddes Coffee House. The panel discussion, titled “Unpacking the 2018 Midterm Elections Results: What We Know and What it May Mean” featured political science professors Darren Davis, Christina Wolbrecht and David Campbell presenting different aspects of the elections.Davis spoke about the presence of racial resentment in the recent midterm elections.“White Americans are angry and anxious, and this was evident and exploited in the 2018 midterm elections,” Davis said. Noah Cha Political science professor Darren Davis discusses racial resentment in the U.S. 2018 midterm elections.He said that explicit racial prejudice cannot fully explain this phenomenon; instead, he said, it is racial resentment, the idea that African Americans and minorities make illegitimate demands on the political system.“This deep fear and anxiety, this racial resentment, comes from the thought that the white way of life and status quo is changing,” he said.Davis said racial resentment is a “system justifying belief” in which the individuals who benefit most from the status quo are more sensitive to threats to the system and are most likely to defend it.Racial resentment was present in specific elections during the midterm, Davis said. There was an overt appeal to race and ethnicity in races such as the Florida and Georgia governor races, as well as in ads from Trump himself.“I have never seen a current president air advertisements during the midterm elections until Trump,” he said. “Trump’s controversial migrant caravan ad was trying to activate that sense of fear.”Most important, Davis said, “racial resentment and system justifying beliefs are alive and functioning in politics today from the president down in stoking anxiety.”Wolbrecht spoke on the impact of women candidates and women voters in the midterms.She said there was a major spike in women running for Congress and winning seats. Most of this nomination jump came from female Democrats, who have had more female nominees than the Republican Party for the past 30 years, Wolbrecht said.“The only thing slowing women is men already sitting in the seats,” she said. “Almost 200 women ran and much fewer were elected, that is just the reality of incumbency in the U.S.”Wolbrecht showed recent headlines and magazine covers attesting that many women were running because they were inspired by Trump, wanting vengeance against his actions.“In reality,” Wolbrecht said, “most women said, ‘no, it’s not about Trump.’ Many ran because they cared about their local community, health care or other policy concerns.”In regards to the female voter, Wolbrecht emphasized the diversity of this demographic.“There is no female voter,” she said. “Women are as diverse as, hold onto your seats, men.” However, she said the biggest difference this election was that women, especially women under 40 and those who are college-educated, were more likely to vote for the Democratic party.Campbell spoke about turnout in the 2018 midterm elections. The 2018 midterm elections had the highest turnout in a century, and the increase was thanks to “a whole bundle of things,” he said.“When it’s not just a boring public service announcement, but young people like yourselves encouraging other people to vote, that is when there is success,” Campbell said.However, he said this turnout spike needs to be put in context. The 2018 turnout almost reached 50 percent, and these numbers are not unprecedented — this number looks even worse on a 0-100 percent scale.“Historically, it is not as high as it could be,” he said. “America’s exceptional, I guess you could say.”His joke was in reference to a chart of voter turnout among other democratic, developed nations where the U.S. ranked nearly dead last, having only stronger turnout than Switzerland.The 2018 midterms were expected to have high turnout and they did have a spike — the 18 to 29 age group clocked in at a high of about 31 percent.“Kids are turning out but they are still slackers compared to their parents and grandparents,” Campbell said.Back in the 1990s, the 18 to 29 age group voted very evenly between the two major parties, he said. Since then, young people have grown increasingly Democratic, with a major Democratic increase happening in the 2018 elections.“I am troubled by this increasing party split among young people,” Campbell said. “I am troubled that we have parties that are divided by so many social divisions, and adding age to that mix will exacerbate party polarization.”Campbell encouraged Notre Dame Republicans to remain active in their party — he said the current divide is not healthy and he hopes the Republican party can move away from the fringes and back to the center right.Tags: 2018 midterm elections, 2018 midterms, Pizza Pop and Politicslast_img read more

Read More →

University chief investment officer to retire in June

first_imgScott C. Malpass, Notre Dame’s chief investment officer of 32 years, will retire June 30, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced in a press release on Friday.During his career, Malpass was responsible for the investment of the University’s endowment and additional assets totaling $14 billion. In his 32 years, the endowment grew $425 million from 1989 to a total $12.5 billion as of June 30, 2019. Endowment spending increased $425.7 million from $19.5 million in the same time period, the press release said.Notre Dame’s endowment provides for scholarship, research, academic programs and institutes, faculty chairs, athletics and one-third of all student financial aid.“The University’s average annual endowment returns over the past 30 years have ranked among the best in higher education and beyond,” Executive Vice President Shannon Cullinan said. “However, I believe Scott’s greatest gift to Notre Dame is the outstanding investment team he has assembled to ensure future generations of students, faculty and staff will benefit from the exceptional stewardship of our endowment.”The Institutional Investor Magazine named Malpass its large endowment manager of the year in 2011. Chief Investment Officer Magazine awarded Malpass its lifetime achievement award in 2014. Malpass also was one of 12 of America’s leading chief investment officers featured in the book, “Foundation and Endowment Investing: Philosophies and Strategies of Top Investors and Institutions.”Malpass graduated from Notre Dame in 1984, and received his master of business administration degree from the University in 1986. After working for Wall Street firm Irving Trust Company for two years, Malpass returned to the University to serve as chief investment officer. Malpass also was a concurrent assistant professor of finance in the Mendoza College of Business. Additionally, Malpass holds a law degree from the UCLA School of Law and an MBA from Harvard Business School.Michael Donovan will take up Malpass’s position. Donovan currently serves as managing director of the Notre Dame Investment Office, where he has worked for 23 years.“It’s been an honor to serve my alma mater, which, in three decades, has been able to realize magnificent aspirations that we could only dream of decades prior,” Malpass said. “That was made possible, in large measure, by the financial genius and devotion to Notre Dame of the investment team that I was privileged to assemble over the years.”Tags: Chief Investment Officer, Endowment, mendoza college of business, Scott Malpasslast_img read more

Read More →

Idina Menzel Reigns, Andrew Rannells Strips and More Lessons of the Week

first_imgWell, it’s still snowing. Just like last Friday. But never fear, cold and wet readers, the Lessons of the Week are here! Let’s sit in front of the fire (or this) with a cup of hot cocoa and revisit the weird, crazy and fun things we’ve learned about our favorite shows and stars over the last seven days.Hugh Jackman Will Be a Four-TimerAnd the 2014 Tony host is…not NPH, Susan Blackwell or Laura Benanti! Hugh Jackman is back, man. (Lin-Manuel Miranda, feel free to use that gem in the Tony rap.)Santino Fontana Has a Thing For WafflesWhile normal stars had childhood crushes on Winnie Cooper and Kurt Russell, Santino Fontana had it bad for Eggo waffles. Well, if they’re so great, why don’t you marry them?Denzel Washington Has a Young MomDiahann Carroll exited A Raisin in the Sun, making way for LaTanya Richardson Jackson, who’s only four years older than her onstage son. Same thing happened in our high school production.Kristin Chenoweth Dreams of Oz (Again)Kristin Chenoweth’s ultimate dream role? A walk-on part in an all-black cast of The Wiz. Later this year, she also hopes to play Denzel Washington’s mother.Rebecca Hall Needs a Magic Eye PosterPoor Rebecca Hall gets so wired after her intense performance in Machinal, she has to stare at the wall for a while just to recover. Anyone have any cute posters of puppies or kitties we could send her?Kelli O’Hara Jumps Out of PlanesThe Bridges of Madison County star, a mom of two, told us she had a mile-high make-out session before jumping out of a plane. Who are you, Kelli O’Hara!? We don’t even know you anymore.Andrew Rannells’ Junk Is PrivateHe’s getting naked on Girls, but Andrew Rannells kept his mouth shut when Katie Couric grilled him about all the tiny details. Well, not tiny… (OK, we totally stole that joke from The Birdcage.)It’s Hard Out There For a Broadway StarIn an unexpected turn of events, Les Miz’s Cosette, Charlotte Maltby, was replaced by Samantha Hill midway through rehearsals. Girl, you and Diahann Carroll need to do lunch.Reese Witherspoon Observes ShabbatThe Book of Mormon’s Ben Platt grew up in Los Angeles, so obviously he had sabbath dinner with Oscar winners. That’s what people do in L.A. But did they really eat carbs? That’d be super weird.Idina Menzel Is Freaking UnstoppableShe’s got a hit movie. A gold record. A new Broadway show. Toddlers everywhere want to be her. Oh, and she’s also performing at the Oscars. Geez, Idina. Why do we even bother getting out of bed? Star Files View Commentscenter_img Idina Menzellast_img read more

Read More →