Japan basketball players suspended after buying sex during Asian Games

first_imgThey would be allowed to take part in training, however, Mitsuya added.The players were spotted in a notorious red light district of the Indonesian capital Jakarta wearing their national jerseys and were promptly sent home in disgrace.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’The expulsion of Yuya Nagayoshi, Takuya Hashimoto, Takuma Sato and Keita Imamura came as a major embarrassment for Japan, which is gearing up for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.“I deeply apologize for our careless actions that have brought disgrace on not only basketball fans but also all Japanese people,” Sato told a news conference last week after the four returned to Tokyo. Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Peza offers relief to ecozone firms RELATED VIDEO They were believed to have been solicited by a pimp to go to a hotel with women but a reporter for Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper spotted them and broke the story.At the last Asian Games in 2014, Japan officials were forced to send home swimmer Naoya Tomita after he was caught on video stealing a journalist’s camera from the pool deck.It is far from the first case of sexual misconduct at major multi-sport events, which typically draw thousands of athletes, officials and fans from around the world.At the 2014 Asian Games, an Iranian official was kicked out for the verbal sexual harassment of a female volunteer, and a Palestinian footballer was accused of groping a female worker at the athletes’ village.In April, at the Commonwealth Games in Australia, a Mauritian official was accused of sexually assaulting a female athlete during a photo shoot.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Didal rules Asian Games skateboarding for PH’s 4th gold medal (L-R) Japanese basketball players Yuya Nagayoshi and Takuya Hashimoto, head of the Japan Basketball Association Yuko Mitsuya, technical chairperson Tomoya Higashino, and players Takuma Sato and Keita Imamura stand to attention at a press conference in Tokyo on August 20, 2018. Four Japanese basketball players on August 20 apologized for disgracing the nation with their “careless act” of paying prostitutes for sex during the Asian Games as the regional Olympics was hit by scandal. / AFP PHOTO / Kazuhiro NOGIFour Japanese basketball players kicked out of the Asian Games for paying prostitutes for sex will be suspended for a year, officials said Wednesday.Japan Basketball Association chief Yuko Mitsuya told reporters the players would be barred from official tournaments for a year, adding their action “damages the honor and trust of Japan’s sporting world”.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taalcenter_img ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? MOST READ DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View commentslast_img read more

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COUNTDOWN TO CROKER: GARDAI WARNING OVER DUBLIN TRAFFIC AS TALL SHIPS TAKE EXTRA 100,000 TO CAPITAL

first_imgNO PLAN SAILING FOR TRAFFIC TODAYGARDAI have issued a warning over traffic delays in and around Dublin today – because 100,000 people are expected to view the last day of the Tall Ships visit to the city.With up to 50,000 heading for Croke Park from Donegal and Cork, it is expected to add to delays and parking problems.“Members of the public should ensure that they park legally and that they do not obstruct roadways or houses. They are strongly advised to utilise the public transport systems,” said a Garda spokesman. “Additional traffic volumes are expected in these areas and members of the public should allow sufficient time for their journeys.“Further information on the Tall Ships Race 2012 is available on www.dublintallships.ie and www.garda.ie.”Fans planning to combine a Tall Ships visit with Croker can see the events below:Sunday’s Tall Ships EventsPARADE OF SAILRIVER LIFFEY 11.00am – 2.00pmJoin this spectacular Bon Voyage to the ships, featuring Dublin Gospel Choir with a special ship songs performance on the Bulmers Live music Dock which will be heard all along the river. OUT OF THE BLUE: FAMILY ZONEGRAND CANAL SQUARE 11.00am – 6.00pmA final fun-filled day of family entertainment will be taking place at Grand Canal Square featuring the Bon Voyage open air family music seisun and lots more.RECORD BREAKING CHARITY EVENTSIR JOHN ROGERSONS QUAY 1.00pm – 2.00pmCome help us make some history and break the world record for the number of people participating in ‘’Rock the Boat’ in aid of Foróige. COUNTDOWN TO CROKER: GARDAI WARNING OVER DUBLIN TRAFFIC AS TALL SHIPS TAKE EXTRA 100,000 TO CAPITAL was last modified: August 25th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:000 TO CAPITALCOUNTDOWN TO CROKER: GARDAI WARNING OVER DUBLIN TRAFFIC AS TALL SHIPS TAKE EXTRA 100last_img read more

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Lasorda steps up to bat for McCourt

first_img Lasorda said he found out why there are so many Tony’s in New York, most of whom are Italian like Lasorda. “When they shipped them over from the old country, they stamped on their forehead: TO New York,” he said. Lasorda also explained why he looks so old. It’s because of his former players, some of whom weren’t that intelligent, he said. For example, there was second baseman Steve Sax. “Steve played baseball like my wife shopped — all day long. He only had one problem: his intelligence,” he said. “It never reached the same level as his ability.” For example, Lasorda used to advise Sax to use the whole field when batting. “He came to me and said, I’ve got this hitting theory down pat now,” Lasorda said. “I said, ‘Good son, what is it?’ He said, ‘Now when I go to the plate, 80 percent of the time I’ll try to hit the ball through the middle, 20 percent I’ll go to the right and another 20 percent I will try to go to left.’ “ Lasorda also talked about a time when the Dodgers had problems defensively. Sax had problems making the throw from second to first base and Pete Guerrero also had problems, he said. Guerrero was a converted outfielder who was placed at third base. “In the first month of the season he couldn’t catch a cold down there,” Lasorda said. Lasorda said he remembers calling Guerrero into his office and asking him if he was concentrating. A good infielder will want the ball to be hit to him. But not Guerrero. “He said, ‘Before the pitcher throws the ball, I looked up to the heavens and say, Dear God, don’t let them hit the ball to me,’ ” Lasorda said. “Then he said, ‘And don’t let them hit it to Sax either.’ “ — Mike Sprague can be reached at (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022, or by e-mail at mike.sprague@sgvn.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SANTA FE SPRINGS — Former Los Angeles Dodger Manager Tommy Lasorda defended Dodgers owner Frank McCourt’s Saturday firing of team General Manager Paul DePodesta at a speaking appearance Tuesday at the city’s first Business VIP luncheon. Lasorda, a special adviser to McCourt, said the criticism of McCourt for the Dodger woes last season when they failed to make the playoffs was unwarranted. “There’s a lot of people who have been kind of critical about Frank McCourt. I’ve been around this guy. I know him. His utmost goal is to get a championship here.” About 150 people attended the lunch sponsored by the city and Chamber of Commerce and Industrial League at Town Center Hall. After his speech, 75 businesses were honored for their contribution to Santa Fe Springs. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Lasorda commented only briefly on McCourt’s decision to fire DePodesta, who had been in the position for only two years. “He found out he made a mistake with the general manager and he had to change,” Lasorda said. “If he wasn’t concerned and he felt like he did and he let the guy continue, then he’s hurting himself and the team.” Lasorda said it is apparent that McCourt is putting the fans first. “He’s going to take every seat out and put a new seat in,” Lasorda said. “He wants it where the fans can be comfortable watching the game.” The colorful former Dodger manager drew some heavy laughter with his jokes about former players and even Italians.last_img read more

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Al-Zarqawi’s PR gaffe chips his jihadist armor

first_imgThe al-Qaida propaganda machine is expanding, its recruitment and public-relations efforts fueled by snazzy Internet forums and videos pulled together by media wing Global Islamic Media Front. Propaganda is a key element in al-Qaida’s strategy to rally Muslims to its cause, join its “army” and meet its far-flung timetable of establishing a caliphate. Al-Qaida even has a new online news show, “Voice of the Caliphate,” which mirrors a traditional news program – except for the masked anchor and Quran and machine gun on the desk, aimed at the viewer. The al-Qaida news network has even been showing an English-language trailer for a film called “Total Jihad.” Yet all the slick production value in the world can’t erase the effects of big public-relations gaffes. Attacks on Western interests in New York, Bali and London have inflamed Western resolve in the War on Terror, but have drawn mixed reaction in the Arab world. To too many, there is something admirable or forgivable in the slaying of non-Muslims all in the name of jihad. But Amman, Jordan, is a different story. The bride was beautiful, the groom was beaming, the friends and family clapping as they stepped into their first celebration as man and wife. Though half a world away in the heart of the Hashemite kingdom, there was absolutely nothing foreign about this scene to any Westerner. Joy turned to tragedy as an al-Qaida operative picked their wedding for a martyrdom quest. Since that letter, al-Zarqawi has exported his terror network to his home country, killing mostly Muslims and infuriating the masses. Yet his “martyrs” still strike regularly in Iraq, targeting Muslims eating at a restaurant or signing up for a job. Some still want to believe that it’s a noble revolutionary quest to oust the oppressors, and try to justify the attacks so. But even if every coalition soldier was gone, the war would be waged against the parliament, the police, the military, Shiites, everyday Iraqis until al-Zarqawi fulfilled his goal of establishing a Muslim caliphate that engulfs Israel. Bottom line. Good won’t triumph in this ideological war until the entire Arab world believes attacking Muslims and non-Muslims alike is dead wrong. But al-Zarqawi’s indiscriminate slayings chip away at his jihadist armor. Bad P.R. is his weakness. And together, Muslims who have had enough have the strength to defeat al-Zarqawi. — Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News. E-mail her at bridget.johnson@dailynews.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Jordanians quickly hit the streets after dozens died in last week’s trio of hotel attacks, chanting “Burn in hell, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi!” outside the sites. One resident of Zarqa, the terrorist’s hometown, told The Associated Press, “If there were still any people with any sympathy left for al-Zarqawi, it’s gone now. It has backfired on him. What does an attack on a wedding with women and children have to do with fighting the Americans?” I asked Omar Fadhil, an Iraqi Sunni who reports with brother Mohammed on popular blog Iraq the Model, what the attitude around Baghdad was toward al-Zarqawi these days. Fadhil replied that there are basically four opinions heard around town: “The first is that Zarqawi is an infidel murderous terrorist who deserves death on Earth and eternal hell after that; this opinion represents the attitude of the majority. The other is that Zarqawi is a mujahid fighting for Islam and Allah and that Muslims must support him; this attitude is endorsed by a small minority of Wahhabi extremists who are a minority among the Sunni population. The third is that Zarqawi is an ally who can help kick the `occupation’ out of Iraq and give power back to the `legitimate’ leaders; this one also represents a minority, the hard-core Baathists. The fourth opinion suggests that Zarqawi is a myth created by the U.S. to justify the presence of the U.S. military in Iraq; this opinion can be found mainly among supporters of Muqtada al-Sadr and the like.” Recently, a letter from Osama bin Laden’s No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahri, to al-Zarqawi urged the Jordanian terrorist to stop killing ordinary Muslims in his jihad campaign. Bad for business, essentially. “(Zarqawi’s) more like a Mafia-type enforcer who doesn’t really see the political niceties that Zawahri does,” James Phillips of the Heritage Foundation told Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty last month. “Implicit in this letter is the political leadership trying to rein in a very brutal lieutenant.”last_img
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Express and SC Villa renew rivalry in do or die affair

first_img Tags: allan kyambaddeAzam UPLExpress FCSC Villatop Express and Villa are both in need of maximum points at different ends of the tableAzam Uganda Premier LeagueExpress FC vs SC VillaMutessa II War Memorial Stadium, WankulukukuFriday, 11-05-2018.Express FC will host SC Villa in the Azam Uganda Premier League on Friday with both sides desperate for three points.The Red Eagles seat third from bottom with only three games remaining in the current season and know that a loss at home to their eternal rivals may turn out to be the sacker punch in the Red Eagles bid to stay in the league.The Red Eagles start the day with 27 points from as many games and seat only a point away from safety.With the other teams above them starting to pull away, the Red Eagles know how vital a win would be for them especially coming against their eternal rivals.For Villa, they head into the game six points behind table leaders Vipers and know that any slip ups in the last three games would mean that they have to wait a little longer for a first title since 2004.With head coach Wasswa Bbosa and assistant Paul Mukatabala both suspended by the Federation and club respectively, goalkeeping coach Mubarak Kiberu is the one expected to be on the touchline for the 16 time record winners.“It is a big game for me and the team, said Kiberu ahead of the tie.“It will be the biggest i have ever been in charge of but the bottom line is that it is not about me.“The game is very important to the club as our title ambitions hang heavily on it and we know that anything short of a win will be disaster.“Express is our eternal rival but i feel we have everything to win the game so i hope luck is on our side.Allan Kyambadde scored the only goal in the reverse fixture last seasonMatch Stats:Head to Head.SC Villa won the first meeting between the two sides 1-0 at Masaka Recreation Grounds in November. Alex Kitata scored the only goal of the game in the 88th minute.However, Villa have defeated the Red Eagles only once at Wankulukuku since 2013 with the victory coming in March 2015 via a 3-0 score line.Express won the reverse fixture last season 1-0 thanks to now Villa midfielder Allan Kyambadde.This fixture has not seen a scoreless result in the last seven years. The last time both teams failed to score in this match was on 01-06-2011.Express FC.Express goes into the fixture having failed to win any of their last three league fixtures (D2 L1).The Red Eagles have won only seven league fixtures this season, drawing five and losing the remaining 15 games, their worst top flight record in the clubs history.They have registered six of their seven wins this season on home turf, drawing three and losing five.Against the top three, Express has lost all of its four fixtures so far this season, but only one came at home when they went down 2-1 at the hands of two time league defending champions KCCA FC.SC Villa.SC Villa goes into the game having won eight of their last 11 league fixtures (D1 L2).The Jogoos have not had it smooth on the road, having triumphed in only four of their opening 13 fixtures away from Masaka (D6 L3).Against the bottom three, Villa has registered a record of four wins in as many games this season. Scoring seven goals and conceding only oneSC Villa have the best defensive record in the division, conceding only 11 goals so far this season. They have not let in more than one goal in a single game this season.Other League games to be played on Friday:Bul FC vs Bright Stars FC @Kyabazinga Stadiun, 04:00pmMaroons vs Police FC @Luzira Prisons Grounds, 04:30pmUPDF FC vs Soana FC @Bombo Barracks Grounds, 04:30pmComments last_img read more

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Tigers take the Little 4, beat Ferndale

first_imgThe Arcata Tigers ran through the Ferndale Wildcats in a physical back and forth game, winning 39-26 to claim an outright Little 4 Conference championship, Friday night at the Redwood Bowl.With Friday’s win Arcata (5-1, 6-4) earns its first league title since winning the Big 5 Conference back in 2012.“Our guys are always going to respond,” Arcata head coach Jamal Jones said. “They have a lot of fight, characters and that’s just who they are.Halfway through the first quarter and with …last_img read more

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Giants call up power-hitting outfielder Jaylin Davis from Triple-A

first_imgST. LOUIS — The Giants have had trouble scoring runs in their first two games in St. Louis this week, so the front office set out to find a solution.Power-hitting outfielder Jaylin Davis might be able to help.The Giants announced Wednesday that Davis was selected to the 40-man roster and called up from Triple-A Sacramento to join the club in St. Louis. To clear space on the roster for Davis, San Francisco transferred reliever Reyes Moronta (right shoulder strain) to the 60-day injured list. …last_img read more

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‘Don’t let conflict undermine Africa’s gains’

first_img30 January 2014The 22nd Ordinary Session of the African Union Assembly got under way in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on Thursday with a call by the continent’s leaders for the silencing of the guns and for peace to prevail on the continent.This as the conflict in the Central African Republic and South Sudan has driven hundreds of thousands of people from their homes, creating a humanitarian crisis in which has been condemned by the United Nations.“Our hearts are with the people of the Central African Republic and South Sudan as they continue to be victims of this conflict,” said African Union Commission chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma.Last week, the AU welcomed the agreement reached by the warring South Sudanese parties on the cessation of hostilities and the status of detainees.The agreement, aimed at ending weeks of fighting that has left thousands dead and displaced, was reached at the talks in the Ethiopian capital between the South Sudanese government and rebels loyal to former vice-president Riek Machar. The talks were held under the mediation of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and the signing of the pact was witnessed by AU peace and security commissioner Smail Chergui.Dlamini Zuma told a packed hall, which included heads of state from the 54 AU member countries, former presidents and delegates from the United Nations, that the continental body would continue to mediate in the war-torn countries until a lasting solution was found.Outgoing African Union chairperson, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, said the emerging conflicts risked escalating into a crisis that could undermine the gains made in recent years.“It is imperative that the peace process succeeds and all parties demonstrate the necessary political leadership and compromise to achieve peace and durable reconciliation,” Desalegn said.Desalegn said the situation in Central African Republic (CAR) remained concerning, particularly the senseless violence that has taken a heavy toll on civilians. He called on world leaders to support the African-led Peace Support Mission in the CAR, which has been deployed there to restore peace and security in order for that country to return to constitutional order.United Nations Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson also weighed in, calling on the AU to “do all it can” to protect civilians in South Sudan.“The situation in Central African Republic is of concern for all of us,” Eliasson said. “It is the objective of the United Nations to put an end to these atrocities; we need to act without delay.”Tribute to MandelaA moment of silence was held at the start of the summit in remembrance of the late Nelson Mandela, who died in December. The plenary hall of the AU’s headquarters, the largest building where AU summits are held, has been named after the former South African statesman.South African President Jacob Zuma took the floor to thank Africa for the hospitality it had extended to Mandela and his comrades during the struggle for liberation in his country.Zuma said that while Mandela had carried a South African passport, he had in fact been a citizen of the world and Africa.“Madiba has left us a legacy that all of us must keep alive,” Zuma said.Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz was elected as the new chairperson of the African Union, succeeding Desalegn, who has been at the helm for the past year.Later in the day, the heads of state will launch the year 2014 as the Year of Agriculture and Food Security, marking the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP).They will consider the report of the Peace and Security Council on its activities and the state of peace and security in Africa, including the activities of the Panel of the Wise alongside the renewal of its membership.The heads of state will also consider the report on the assessment of the African Standby Force and the operationalization of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises, as well as launch the final report of the High Level Panel on Fragile States.The so-called Agenda 2063 will also be considered, with the final adoption expected at the 23rd AU summit later this year.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Jim Keenan on What Is Not Taught – Episode 46

first_imgTweets you can use to share this episodeThere’s nothing wrong with a left turn and a right turn ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetYou just have to be deliberate in what you do ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 22:18 — 20.5MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSToday we hear about what we are not being taught to be successful, from Jim Keenan. Jim’s new book, Not Taught, represents a journey of discovery in how giving gives back, even when you are not expecting it. The story of the book began when Jim was asked to give a speech to graduates about what they really needed to know going forward. The speech funneled into a blog post, which stuck with Jim. He then turned it into an ebook, did more research, added to it, and eventually became the published version it is today. So what is it that graduates these days need to know? What are we not being taught? Jim says that our parent’s generation believed one way: get a good job and work there forever. That has all changed. The world these students are entering is playing by different rules that their parents could not have prepared them for. Tune in for the education you may have missed, on today’s episode of In the Arena. There’s never been such a good time to be successful ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetThe time is now to get paid to thinkDuring the industrial age, a boss would have scoffed at the idea of paying someone to think. That mindset was a joke. No one approached their boss with ideas, instead everyone had their place and expectations. Today, Jim Keenan says companies are desperate for thinking people. It is all about creatively solving problems. There are no longer steps to follow, roles to assume, and one way to operate. The old industrial age mindset is a disadvantage when entering today’s market. Big companies lay employees off when the economy shifts and are no longer a long-term reliable basket to put any of your eggs in. Jim wants to prepare you for the information age, which creates room for thinking and for ideas to matter. Find out today if you are really embracing the change this age is bringing, with Jim Keenan as he shares insights from his book, “Not Taught.”What is your reach?“Reach” and “brand” are two buzzwords Jim Keenan wants you to be able to define for yourself. Your reach is the ability for people to find you. Do you have a LinkedIn profile? Is it current and complete? Without utilizing tools like this, you are inhibiting your own chances of being noticed, known, and ultimately hired. The importance of reach really comes down to how many people can you influence? How can you move your message through people and get them talking about it. Reach is not a new idea, it has always been important, but why? People pay for reach. If you can connect yourself to people, and people to people, you can move whatever you want through those groups, and they will react. Listen in to start discovering your own reach.Expect the shifts ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetNot Taught: It’s branding season The next thing Jim Keenan advises to be thinking about is your brand. Who are you and what do you want to be known for? There is often a lack of trust in oneself to figure out a brand and work on it. Many people find themselves stuck between thinking it is too late to start working on their brand and waiting for approval to develop one. Having a brand creates massive value. One perspective Jim speaks to is the younger millennials mixed up in the industrial age mindset and influence of their parents, with no green light motivation to move forward. Jim calls you forward into asking where it is you want to go and how to start moving that direction. It is time to embrace your brand. Shifting out of autopilotThe first step you take creates something necessary: movement. If you find yourself stuck on autopilot, you need to make a move. Yes, you will be forced to ask questions for yourself and shift your brand. Jim Keenan does not want you to hold yourself back, or worse, be boring. Is fear holding you back? Fear of how people will react to you? A lot of people think they are okay if they are not getting negative reactions. But what if you embraced the struggle and stopped to think about what you really want to be good at and known for? Many adults are completely rooted in the 20th century, but attempting to live in this century. And a lot of these people, as long as they don’t screw up, will be fine. But that is autopilot. Get ready to shift gears on this episode of In the Arena. You’re boring because you’re afraid of how people will react to you ~ Jim KeenanClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Introduction of today’s guest, Jim Keenan. What compelled Jim to write Not Taught. The different age we are now living in. The new message for today’s emerging graduates. Dissecting the term “reach.” Dissecting the term “brand” for both youth and adults. The fear involved in “figuring it all out”. Jim’s own journey. Diving into the chapter entitled, “Don’t Be Boring.” Addressing a listener’s email and affirming Jim’s book. The most exciting part of Jim’s new book.Our Sponsors:2 Free Week Trial of Cirrus InsightsResources & Links mentioned in this episodeJim’s website:  A Sales GuyJim Keenan’s book0692520767 The theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

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Ring Side View

first_imgIsland of BloodFrontline reports from Sri Lanka, Afghan-istan, and Other South Asian Flashpointsby Anita PratapPenguin Books,276 pp.At many points in Anita Pratap’s first book, Island of Blood, the pace is as taut and desperate with tension as a good summer thriller. Her adventures include spending days tracking through Sri Lanka’s hot steamy jungles, braving the snakes and the bullets of the Indian army; exposing herself to the wrath of the Taliban militia when she ventured into Kabul in a burqa, knowing that soldiers would have shot her to death if they knew she was an Indian woman and a reporter to boot; and witnessing the frightening spectacle of a frenzied mob destroying Babri Masjid. What gives the book solid emotional heft are Pratap’s moving stories of the people she encountered while on her travels. By grounding her escapades with chronicles of the ordinary people whose lives were being tragically transformed by ruthless political leaders, she draws a painful portrait of the price paid for violence. Although the book has a tendency to hop from one situation to another rather rapidly and is dotted with self-praise, by combining her journalistic reports with interviews of local people and scenes from her personal life, Pratap punches her memoir with comedy and drama, allowing the reader to have an intimate glimpse into the workings of a war reporter.For instance, what does a reporter do when she is generously slathered with blobs of earth from head to toe as she travels in an open tractor trailer through the jungle? Pratap turns philosophical: “I could now look at the worms and insects crawling on my muck-covered skin with total composure. I couldn’t help thinking how fertile the wet earth was – what seemed just mud to us was home to a million different organisms.”The heart of the book focuses on her work in Sri Lanka, perhaps rightly so, since that is where she gained an international reputation for being an intrepid journalist who had gained access to one of the world’s most feared guerilla leaders , V.Pirabhakaran, the brain behind the operations of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE). There is a humorous passage in the book where Pratap describes her disenchantment at her first sight of Pirabhakaran at a meeting in Madras. Having watched LTTE video documentaries where the guerilla chief, in army fatigues with a machine gun, looked tall and tough, she doesn’t even recognize the short, stocky, soft-spoken man who walks into the room and announces that he is Pirabhakaran.Pratap accounts of her various meetings with him in India and Sri Lanka are etched out in detail, although not in chronological order, but they give a real glimpse into the personality of an underground leader who commands utter loyalty from his followers. Through her reports, Pirabhakaran evolves from a charismatic young Eelam revolutionary called Thambi (Tamil for younger brother) in the 1980s to a ruthless, military commander reverentially called, Annai or elder brother.In one chilling scene, Pratap watches Pirabhakaran deliver a threat to the Indian army where he promised to kill Indian soldiers if even one LTTE boy was hurt. Likening his unblinking stare to a king cobra on the verge of striking, she notes that Pirabhakaran had “gone taut, all ready to spring.” But the snake could turn and bite one of its own too, as Pratap reveals, when she describes the downfall of Mahatiya, his once second in command.Because Mahatiya was suspected of advocating peace, or of being close to RAW, he is reported to have fallen from grace. Pratap describes talking to Mahatiya for the last time at one of her meetings with Pirabhakaran. She is appalled to see him stand before them with folded hands and humbly assert that he was fine. “Gone was the swagger, the confidence, the muscular machismo,”she writes. Mahatiya was supposed to have been executed soon after.Interspersing her interviews with Pirabhakaran are accounts of her talks with Sri Lankan government leaders and Indian army officers and stomach-turning accounts of the violent deaths she sees. She barely escapes being killed herself during many of her trips and seems to move on to the next story with nary a qualm. Pratap ends her Sri Lankan odyssey with her escorting a Tamil boy out of Batticaloa, where he was in danger of being killed as a Tiger by Sri Lankan forces, into Columbo where he will fly out to the United States for graduate studies. It seems to be her final gift to a land she sentimentally notes “will always be part of my destiny.”Pratap’s accounts of her reporting in Afghanistan do not center around a person or even a group. Here she gives us vignettes of ordinary people she bumped into while traveling with a CNN camera crew, and their brave optimism in the face of despotic rule. Mateem, a vegetable seller in Kabul’s streets was caught in the panic of fleeing citizens. Mateem manages to get on to a gasoline truck that is leaving the city but the truck explodes when it is hit by gunfire. Mateem survives, but his skin is burnt off. Pratap stops by his bedside in a Kabul hospital a few days later, where, with his entire body covered in bandages and moaning in deep pain, Mateem tells her that he hopes peace and freedom will come to his land soon.In an orphanage, Pratap talks to Dilfor, an old widow who is so poor she cannot even afford a burqa, the requisite garment for a woman who went out of her house. Dilfor comes to work in the orphanage because she has no choice. How will she eat? Every morning, she stops and hides in alleys, watching for the turbaned heads of the Taliban soldiers, in a grotesque game of cops and robbers, to sneak into work. She knows that if she is caught it will be death for her, but in the meanwhile, she dies every day with the fear of being seized as she runs back and forth from home. The tension takes its toll on her. “She was startled by anything and everything.” comments Pratap.The reports on the ethnic wars in Ayodhya and Bombay, and the utter devastation that natural calamities wrought in Bangladesh, Killari, and Hazara are equally disturbing in its range of human suffering. Unlike a newspaper report where the eyes can turn to another page and allow the mind to wander away from painful story, Pratap pulls readers deeper into the scene, giving voice to the hundreds and thousands of common people who suffer the consequences of neglect and exploitation, whether it is of women suffering under the Taliban or the prospects of being burnt in a dowry death episode, families facing death by starvation in an earthquake or cyclone, or being swept away by a rain-swollen river. While the book could have benefitted by chipping off the some of the adjectives that overstate the obvious , Pratap reveals that as a war correspondent, she was able, under some of the harshest conditions, to deliver a heartbreakingly clear ring side view of some of the world’s most tragic events in our times.   Related Itemslast_img read more

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