Sherry Turkle to give centennial year Lowell Lecture May 14

first_imgSherry Turkle, founder and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Initiative on Technology and Self, will give this centennial year’s Lowell Lecture, titled “The Tethered Life: Technology Reshapes Intimacy and Solitude,” on May 14 (8 p.m., Lowell Lecture Hall), hosted by the Harvard University Extension School.Turkle, a featured media commentator on many network and cable news programs, has focused her research on psychoanalysis and culture and on the psychology of people’s relationship with technology, especially computer technology. Her focus has been on what computers do to our relationships, families, and ways of thinking about what is special about being human. Turkle considers the significant impact technology has on our personal and political lives, including the effect on our children, our families, and society’s notions of privacy.For more information about the lecture and other upcoming events, visit the Harvard Extension School Web site.last_img read more

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Master Gardeners Milestone

first_imgFor the past 40 years, Georgians have been helping their friends and neighbors build better landscapes, plant healthier gardens and protect their local ecosystems through the University of Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer program.Since its founding in 1979, the Georgia program has grown to include 2,700 volunteers who gave more than 180,000 hours of time in 2018. The program’s success is due to the dedication of the Master Gardeners, as well as the sense of community that this army of volunteers has built over the years.“Every program is a little bit different, but it doesn’t matter because it’s the same premise,” said David Gibby, Master Gardener program founder, when he visited Georgia in April to celebrate with the UGA Master Gardener Extension Volunteers. “The premise is people who love people and love gardening doing a lot of service for people who need it. That is the whole key to it.“In 1972, Gibby was a Washington State University (WSU) Extension agent in charge of answering homeowner gardening questions from more than 5 million people in the metro Seattle area. It was an impossible task.Frustrated, he drew on the tradition of volunteerism that he learned growing up in the Mormon church and decided to recruit garden club members he worked with to help expand the number of people served by WSU Extension in the area.He called these volunteers “Master Gardeners,” from the German word “Gartenmeister,” which means “having a top proficiency level in horticulture.” They held clinics and workshops at shopping malls and community centers, and the program flourished.  After just two years as an agent, Gibby left Extension to work in reforestation for Weyerhauser, but his revolutionary idea took root. Between 1976 and 1980, Master Gardener programs expanded to Cooperative Extension systems across the country. It expanded to Canadian provinces in the 1980s and South Korea in the early 2000s. There remains a growing interest in the idea of Master Gardener volunteers in other countries around the world.“Within a year or so of us starting, it was already gaining traction all over the country,” Gibby said. “Now it’s even starting to gain international attention. I think you’re going to see it all over because it works. People see something that takes care of a really big problem. Anybody who is in the profession of trying to teach people how to garden wants something that’s going to help; they want any kind of help they can get.”Nationally, there are more than 90,000 active Master Gardeners. In 2016, state programs in the U.S. reported more than 5 million hours volunteered in support of Extension’s consumer horticulture programming. Additionally, these dedicated volunteers spent more than 700,000 hours training and learning about horticulture in support of their volunteer service.Since 2012, Gibby has been actively visiting states with Master Gardener programs, meeting their volunteers and sharing the story of the program’s early years.In Georgia, the program is active in 60 counties across the state. Volunteers focus on answering questions fielded by county UGA Extension offices, establishing demonstration gardens, and teaching at schools, parks, camps, hospitals, prisons, nursing homes, farmers markets and community gardens.Gibby has always been excited to talk to his Extension friends to find out how large the program is becoming. Today, he’s amazed by the program’s endurance and its power to change people’s lives.“Most of these (volunteers) who’ve been in it, they’ve enjoyed it,” Gibby said. “It doesn’t matter if they’ve been in for 10 or 20 years or if they’ve been in for two years. They’re hooked and they like it because they know they’re doing good. They know they’re helping people. They’ve seen it … And the nice thing is that, once they’ve done that service, they feel good about themselves. They feel they’re making a contribution to their community and to themselves. “For Sheri Dorn, state coordinator for UGA Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program, being part of this legacy of service makes what her volunteers do on a daily basis even more rewarding.“Extension Master Gardeners are extraordinary people. They are passionate and energetic, often bringing to life the programming that Extension is offering,” said Dorn. “They love sharing with others about plants and gardening, helping people to find answers to their horticultural questions. As a result, our communities are enriched, not just from the interaction with these terrific volunteers, but by the numerous personal and community benefits of plants. Ask a Master Gardener how long they intend to be a Master Gardener, and they’ll tell you, ‘For life!’ ”For more information about becoming a Master Gardener in Georgia or to find answers to your gardening questions, visit www.georgiamastergardener.org.For more information about the history of the Master Gardener program, visit Gibby’s website at mastergardener.net.last_img read more

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Telemark Workshop at Timberline

first_imgAs we wrap up January and move into the first weekend in February, now is the time for a little reflection. New Year’s Resolutions are long gone and probably forgotten, but don’t let the same be said for winter. True, the Southeast and mid-Atlantic did see an unseasonably warm week with temperatures in the 50s and pushing 60 in some parts, but this is not atypical for the first month of the year. This is a time for reflection because we are at the turning point. You can either pack up the ski equipment and start getting the spring wardrobe out of the attic, or you can double down on winter and hit the slopes this weekend. I vote for the latter, as Punxsutawney Phil will be making his annual climate prediction on Saturday, Groundhog Day, and anything could happen: he could see his shadow, not see his shadow, bite the mayor’s nose off, hold out for a better contract, relive the same day over and over, relive the same day over and over, etc. Better get your turns in now, while you still have your sanity.Timberline Ski Mountain outside Davis, West Virginia is preparing for a return of winter proper as a low pressure system swinging in from the West will collide with the warm air pumping in from the South to hopefully drop the temperatures and some snow this weekend. Look for fresh tracks, but also to try something new as on Saturday, they will be hosting a telemark ski workshop. There will be clinics, lectures, discounted lift tickets for those participating and a limited amount of rental Nordic gear available so show up early and try your hand at something new, and definitely different.View Larger Maplast_img read more

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Digital IDs will make card payments & cash transactions irrelevant

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Even a routine purchase like putting gas in the car requires consumers to think through how they will make the payment. Will they use a credit card, debit card, cash, or a digital wallet?Once they decide, they have to navigate through their wallet (digital or physical) and make the payment. Usually that requires an additional digital entry or even paperwork before they can pump the gas.While people are used to this routine (and others like it) there is a better way. Consider this simplified scenario: A consumer pulls up, pumps the gas and drives away. That’s it.The payment is made without anything being done by the driver. This type of “invisible transaction” may become common sooner than many think. Already a variation of it is in use at Amazon Go stores in several cities where people can buy goods and “just walk out” — no checkout required.Here’s what has to happen to enable this type of frictionless payment in an open environment, such as the gas pump scenario: continue reading »last_img read more

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201 S and Main St., traffic are re-opened following car crash

first_img12 News reporters on the scene say that traffic heading Southbound toward Vestal is being redirected onto Route 17 west and traffic headed Northbound toward the Oakdale Mall is not being impacted. 1:32 A.M. UPDATE: The road is re-opened again following a crash. JOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — Johnson City Police have confirmed they have responded to a motor vehicle crash at Route 201 and Main Street in Johnson City Sunday evening. —– This is a developing story, stay with 12 News as we get more information.last_img read more

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Chapel Hill home sells in off-market sale for $1.025m

first_imgThe home at 9 Crestview St, Kenmore, sold for $590,000.Another home, at 9 Crestview St, Kenmore, meanwhile sold for $590,000 after a staggering 92 groups viewed the property.Your Haven Realty principal Nick Kruger said it was a changing of the guard, with the vendors having lived there for 19 years.“The new buyer is a first-home buyer looking to renovate, and they have a baby due in August, so it was good for the sellers to know someone will come in and make more memories,” Mr Kruger said.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 10:02Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -10:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenJune, 2018: Liz Tilley talks prestige property10:02 The home at 9 Ootana St, Chapel Hill sold for $1,025,000.CHAPEL Hill continues to boom, as the sale of a home sold off market for $1,025,000 shows.McGrath Estate Agents Paddington sales agent Reuben Packer-Hill said the vendor bought a block at 9 Ootana St for $725,000 two and a half years ago, before knocking the old home down and subdividing the property.The vendor then built a new home on each block, with the first selling in an off-market deal.“We had been working with the buyers for six months,” he said.“We knew this would suit them and we took them through it while it was still being built and they loved the design.More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019“They are a young family who wanted to be close to Indooroopilly State School.”last_img read more

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Modern Police Stations for La Plaine and Calibishie

first_img Tweet Share Share LocalNews Modern Police Stations for La Plaine and Calibishie by: – April 7, 2012 Sharing is caring!center_img Photo credit: featurepics.comGovernment’s commitment to ensuring the safety and security of all its citizens and residents is being advanced through the construction of two additional modern police stations in the communities of La Plaine and Calibishie at an estimated cost of EC$6.3 million.According to a press release issued by the Office of the Prime Minister on Monday, these facilities along with the almost completed Grand Bay Police Station will bring to three, the number of modern, fully equipped Police Stations under Governments current initiatives.Government has also increased the number of officers’ recruits within the various communities across the country. Police officers have been provided with modern crime fighting tools, vehicles and equipment.The Salybia, Mahaut and Marigot Police Stations have been refurbished with works to commence on the Roseau Police Station shortly.These initiatives enhance the effectiveness of the Police Force in providing national security services.By: Pearl FontaineGovernment Information Service Share 53 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Relay Raises $125,000 Through Past Weekend

first_imgLocal residents banded together this weekend in the fight against cancer.Organizers say the 19th annual event at Batesville High School raised upwards of $125,000.Some participating teams and individuals were recognized over the weekend for their financial contributions and volunteerism.The Global Atlantic-Forethought team and St. Paul Lutheran Church of Oleans were recognized for the amount of funding the groups have raised this year.Individual awards were given to some local participants:Compassion award: Carolyn BeverageCourage award: Cheryl BlackburnMary Margaret Moorhead award: Janice WilsonDonations are still being accepted on the Ripley County Relay For Life website.There were thirty teams that took part in the event this year:Andie MeyerAngels Among UsBatesville/ HillenbrandBessler’s “Trackside” WalkersBridge of Hope Worship CenterDee’s AngelsFight Like A GirlGlobal Atlantic- ForethoughtHill-RomHopewell Baptist ChurchJay C Food StoresKiwanis International of BatesvilleMMCH Caring Hearts/ Hansen CenterMaurice’s 1441Milan SchoolsNew Marion Baptist ChurchPhi Beta Psi SororityRiver Valley Financial BankRunning RascalsSouth Ripley SchoolsSoutheastern Indiana REMCSpencer Tyson RunnersSt. John’s UCC, HuntersvilleSt. Paul Lutheran Church, OleanSunman Walking WarriorsTeam NapoleonTeam Teal & WhiteTim Sutton for SheriffTying a Knot in CancerVersailles Lions Clublast_img read more

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Bernice Freeman

first_imgBernice A .Knue Freeman age 89 passed peacefully away Friday evening at St. Andrews Health Campus.  She was born on June 13, 1927 in Batesville, IN to  Raymond H. and Marcellina (Federle) Billman. Bernice attended St. Louis Catholic School and ICA.  In 1949 she married John Maurice Knue and made her home at Dover.  They raised a family of 6 children on the Knue Farm.  She was a dedicated wife, mother, life-long St. John’s Parish member and St. Ann’s Alter Society. She enjoyed sewing and playing cards monthly with the neighborhood card ladies.  She was known for her talent and love of quilting.  All her children, grandchildren relatives and friends will treasure her special quilts in her memory.  She was later married to James Freeman and continued to make her home in Dover.  They enjoyed traveling, gardening and being with both families.  Throughout her children’s lives she was a proud mother to 4 military sons and also grandsons. She is survived by four sons: John (Carol) Knue, Waco, TX; Gerry (Kathy) Knue, Dover, IN; Nick (Paula) Knue, Newport News, VA; Kris (Angela) Knue, Circleville, OH. Also two daughters: Patty (Doug) Harper, Dover, IN; and Karen (Jim) Ripperger, Sunman, IN; 17 grandchildren, and 18 great grandchildren. She was a proud step-mom to Tom(Henrietta) Freeman; Ken(Barb) Freeman, and Mary Rose Freeman Kubszak, their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. She was proceeded in death by her brother Ray Billman. A celebration of her life will be held Tuesday, September 27 from 5-8 pm at the Andres Wuestefeld Funeral Home, Dover with Mass of Christian Burial at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Dover, Wednesday at 11:00 am with burial following.last_img read more

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First responders complete crisis intervention training

first_imgLAWRENCEBURG, Ind. — Multiple first responder agencies in Dearborn and Ohio counties have completed training for the Crisis Intervention Team of Dearborn and Ohio Counties.The training prepares first responders how to handle a mental health crisis.The training covers extensive topics on mental illnesses including addictions, legal issues, de-escalation techniques, and role playing mental health crisis situations.Residents in Dearborn and Ohio counties may now call 911 and request a CIT officers when dealing with a mental health issue.last_img read more

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