Chorale to perform sacred, patriotic works in concert

first_imgThe Notre Dame Chorale, the University’s official concert choir, will perform its annual fall concert at 8 p.m. Friday in DeBartolo Performing Arts Center’s Leighton Concert Hall. The theme of the concert is “God, Country, Notre Dame.”“The concert will feature sacred works (God), patriotic songs (country) and school songs (Notre Dame) in addition to Irish airs and the Scottish song ‘Loch Lomond,’” Chorale director Alexander Blachly said. “There will also be a special feature of the program with the participation of the newly-formed Notre Dame Children’s Choir.”Blachly said the repertoire of the group ranges from Gregorian chants, Renaissance motets and classical pieces to more contemporary works. Staff pianist Paivi Ekroth will accompany the choir’s vocals.The show, which will last approximately one hour with no intermission, celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Chorale and kicks off a weekend-long Chorale alumni reunion.“This is a celebration of the past members of the Chorale,” Blachly said.”The reunion will continue the next day after the concert with singing activities in Leighton Concert Hall and a visit to the DPAC organ hall.”Senior Mimi Michuda, Chorale president, said she appreciates the emotion and excitement surrounding the reunion.“Chorale is more than just close friendships, we are a family,” she said.Junior Erin Bishop, Chorale treasurer, said the concert will feature many changes from of the past performances.“The officers and myself have worked really hard with Alex [Blachly] to revamp our concerts and to hopefully increase attendance,” she said. “This concert, we’re singing a much greater variety of pieces, especially with the more modern patriotic and school songs.”Blachly said the Chorale has about 50 members, both male and female, most of whom are undergraduate students representing every college. Besides the fall concert, the Chorale also performs Handel’s Messiah with the Notre Dame Festival Orchestra each December, embarks on a winter tour each January and travels for an international tour every three or four years. The Chorale has also performed with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra, and the group will participate in a performance of Mendelssohn’s Elijah next March.“Many students do not know about Chorale because there are many other choirs on campus that sing much more modern music,” Bishop said. “We want people to know that we’re here as well and just as great of a group.”Tickets for the fall concert are free for students and $10 for the general public. They can be purchased at the DPAC box office or online at performingarts.nd.eduTags: Alexander Blachly, Chorale Fall Concert, DPAC, God Country Notre Dame, leighton concert hall, The Notre Dame Choralelast_img read more

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Students present ideas at App Fair

first_imgEight teams of students presented various apps they designed and created as part of the Notre Dame App Club’s second annual App Fair on Wednesday night.Senior Nick Pellegrino, president of the App Club, said the event and the club came about last year as a means of drawing attention to students’ ideas and giving them an opportunity to develop these ideas.“The big thing that we were going for when we started was that we wanted to have an organization that would bring all these various side projects that students are working on into the main light,” he said. “Because a lot of people just do these projects on the side and don’t really get much credit or recognition for it, so our club was trying to bring that into the present.”The eight teams produced a variety of concepts, Pellegrino said, which ranged from an app to organize pickup sports games to a mental health support app.“We got quite a wide variety in terms of scope,” he said. “There are apps that are localized to the Notre Dame community, and then other ones that are trying to blow up into big businesses and stuff like that.”This creativity came as a result freedom given to the participants, Pellegrino said.“During the year, you might’ve heard about the ND App Challenge or these hack-a-thons … but the thing is, they’re all centered around a central theme or idea,” he said. “What I wanted with this event is just to have no theme or idea. I don’t want to have people directing their ideas toward something that I want to see or something like some sort of goal. Although they’re usually benevolent goals, at the end of the day I didn’t want to stifle that creativity.”The judges awarded first place — along with a $250 gift card — to the team made up of senior Jackson Jhin, junior John Joyce and junior Rob Simari. Their app, Float, is a “peer-to-peer insurance network” that connects people who purchase tickets to an event with a “backup” buyer in order to ensure a partial refund if the original purchaser is unable to attend the event.“Insurance, basically, on tickets right now is a scam,” Simari said. “So we wanted to provide an alternate way of doing that. … So we have an insurance buyer and a discount buyer.”While last year’s event gave each team a time slot to present their app in front of the fair’s judges and attendees, Pellegrino said the App Club wanted to allow for more hands-on judging this year with a science fair setup in which judges could test the apps themselves.“This time we wanted to have a much more fluid, kind of more dynamic [event and] have people kind of walk around, get a sense and feel from everybody here,” he said. “ … We just wanted something where people just come in, drop by for a minute if they wanted to, see what they want and go on with their schedules.”Pellegrino said he hopes all participants gained valuable insight from the process of creating an app and receiving feedback on their work.“The main point is just to get these students’ work out there and get some recognition — and also some good feedback,” he said. “We have a number of experienced entrepreneurs here, as well, so they’ve been offering feedback on … the projects.”Simari said he appreciates the opportunity to develop and present his app in front of his peers and experienced professionals.“People at Notre Dame are the people who have an itch to solve a problem,” he said. “I think that’s just who most of us are, and I think we’re always solving problems, but this is a way for us to show what we’ve done. I think that we’re already solving problems, but just giving us an avenue to speak to people in industry and get feedback is a really valuable experience. I think the App Club does exactly that.”Tags: App Club, App Fair, entrepreneurshiplast_img read more

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Killer bees looming

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaResearchers in Georgia are keeping a watchful eye for invadersfrom the south. Tiny attackers, Apis mellifera scutellata, alsoknown as Africanized honeybees or killer bees, have begun asteady march north and could reach Georgia borders soon.Fear not, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extensionentomologist Keith Delaplane. But do be aware. Know the dangersand how to react to keep as safe as possible.”If you are outdoors and happen on an Africanized bee colony andthe insects attack you, run and get indoors and stay indoors,” hesaid. “Don’t stay in one spot and swat the bees or roll on theground. Run away. React the opposite to if you were on fire.”Staying indoors a key to safety”If you are attacked and run and jump in your car and 10 bees goin the car with you,” Delaplane said, “don’t leave the car toescape the 10, because a thousand are waiting for you outside.Stay inside even if a few follow you in.”Avoiding a massive number of stings is the key. “With Africanizedbees,” Delaplane said, “they can attack in such large numbersthat it’s possible to receive a toxic dose of venom. This is incontrast to the more familiar allergic reaction in whichsusceptible individuals can have dangerous reactions to even onesting.”Recognizing an Africanized colony is critical.”You can’t tell by sight,” Delaplane said. “One negative backlashto our educational efforts has been oversightings. To look at thebees, you can’t tell. They’re smaller than European bees. Buteven the scientific tests we use to differentiate can beinconclusive.”So how do you tell?”Their behavior is the best key,” he said. “Everything(Africanized) bees do, they do it off the chart, pushed to theextreme. If you bump into a regular colony, you might get 20 beeschasing you. But if you bump into an Africanized colony, you mayget 1,000 chasing you. It’s the same response, just multiplied.”The best defense is avoidance.”Don’t go near a nest,” Delaplane advised. “They’ll nest inunusual places that European bees won’t bother with, like adiscarded can or drink bottle. Their unusual nesting habitsincrease the chance for bee-and-human contact. The nest iscentral to understanding their behavior. A bee visiting a floweris not a problem. It’s only when they’re in their nest andperceive it threatened that their defense response is triggered.”If you see a swarm hanging on a limb, call your county UGAExtension agent, a local beekeeper or a professional bee removalservice for help.Delaplane has been busy distributing UGA Extension bulletins andworking with local media to educate Georgians about the bees.First respondersAnother target group is emergency responders. “Fire fighters andother first responders will have to deal with mass stingingincidents,” Delaplane said. Throughout the year he and hiscolleagues have been conducting statewide seminars for EMTs, firefighters and police forces.Delaplane has been working with beekeepers too. “We’ve beentalking about it for a long time with them,” he said. “They’re avery important part of this process in many ways. First, theEuropean honeybees they keep are a natural defense againstAfricanized honeybees taking over.”Some areas have passed zoning rules to eliminate beekeeping totry to stave off the Africanized bees. Delaplane says that’s thewrong tactic.”Beekeepers are friends, not enemies in this process,” he said.”Some areas tend to zone out beekeeping, which is ill-advised. Ifyou withdraw the gentle European bees, you’ve just opened up theenvironment to allow the Africanized bees to take over. A largelocal European bee population is the only way to restrict theAfrican variety.”(Faith Peppers is a news editor for the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Classic City Awards

first_imgEvery summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of the best of those plants become Classic City Award winners. Announced earlier this month, the awards are given to plants that are tough enough to thrive through the extreme heat conditions of a Georgia summer. “We pick Classic City Award winners every year to recognize the 10 or 12 best plants in the garden,” said John Ruter, professor of horticulture at UGA and director of the Trial Gardens. “Breeders send us their plants because they want to see if they can grow in the heat and humidity of a Georgia summer … These plants did the best in that heat and humidity this year.” Since 1982, the Trial Gardens on UGA’s Athens Campus have been used as a literal testing ground for plants from around the world. By evaluating new selections of annuals and perennials, the Trial Gardens’ staff helps to introduce new plants to the Southeast’s green industry and the general public. The Trial Gardens’ plant evaluations are respected across the globe. Commercial nurseries across the country depend on the staff’s recommendations to determine what they will grow for sale the following season, which means many of this year’s hardiest plants will be available in garden centers next spring. Plants labeled “Classic City Award winner” have a better-than-average chance of surviving the typical Georgia garden and gardener. “If you do a little soil prep, plant them properly and keep them watered, these plants should do well,” said Ruter who is also a researcher with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “The Classic City Award winners are low-maintenance plants that have a good chance of thriving in your garden.” Gardeners who want to hear Ruter describe the 2015 growing season at the Trial Gardens and see pictures of this year’s award winners can watch an archived webinar at tinyurl.com/ClassicCityAwards2015. For more information about the Trial Gardens and this year’s trial results, visit ugatrial.hort.uga.edu. About this year’s Classic City Award winners:Begonia Baby Wing® ‘Bicolor’ – PanAmerican SeedMany of the Trial Gardens’ begonias performed well this summer, however Baby Wing® ‘Bicolor’ stood out as being brighter than the others. Its dark green foliage provides pleasant contrast to the unique flowers, which are rose with white centers.Caladium ‘Debutante’ – Classic CaladiumsAll of Robert Hartman’s caladiums excel in the least desirable, shadiest spots of our garden. ‘Debutante,’ with its tough, white leaves with undulating edges and deep green veins, was exceptionally stellar this year. The leaves reddened as the weather cools. ‘Debutante’ makes a stellar public outing and should be used to fill gardens with its beauty.Capsicum ‘Basket of Fire’ – VegetalisEven though ‘Basket of Fire’ has been around for some time, it is still among the best of the ornamental peppers trialed at UGA. The plants are less than 12 inches tall and covered in 2-inch slender fruits that transform from yellow to orange to red. The plants produce countless, colorful peppers that withstand all of the summer’s weather conditions.Catharanthus Cora® Cascade™ ‘Strawberry’ – Syngenta/Goldsmith SeedsThis summer was not the best for annual vinca in the Trial Garden, but many did well. Cora® Cascade™ ‘Strawberry’ performed as well as its competitors, was far more rugged and thrived until the end. This spreading vinca fills in rapidly, with large, dark pink flowers with a rose center over the entire plant. Impatiens Sun Harmony™ ‘Pink’ – Danziger Flower FarmLike other New Guinea impatiens (NGI) meant for the sun, Sun Harmony™ ‘Pink’ performed exceptionally well in our blazing hot Georgia sunshine. The plants, which grew to 20 to 26 inches and were covered with large, bright pink blooms, withstood heavy rains, wind and other impediments and outperformed all other varieties. Lobularia ‘Lavender Stream’ – Danziger Flower FarmLike others in the Stream series of Lobularia from Danziger have before, this year’s ‘Lavender Stream’ proved to be one of the absolute best plants in the garden. Despite the weather, this variety continued to flourish, growing into a blanket of zillions of fragrant, tiny, lavender blooms. If history is any indication, ‘Lavender Stream’ and its siblings will thrive well into our winter. Petunia Tidal Wave® ‘Silver’ – PanAmerican SeedThe fact that any petunia survived our wet early summer followed by the extreme heat and drought of late summer is a miracle. Tidal Wave® ‘Silver’ not only survived, but it flourished for months. The plants grew into a nice mound, covered in flowers that were white-purple with a purple center. Petunia Supertunia® ‘Violet Star Charm’ – Proven WinnersFor years, Proven Winners has produced many fabulous petunia varieties that have done well in trials. Supertunia® ‘Violet Charm’ quickly grew into a compact mound of small, white-with-violet-stripes flowers that blanketed the plants. It was in full bloom for months and it withstood our weather effortlessly.Salvia ‘Mojave Red Improved’ – FloranovaSeveral Salvia splendens varieties have been trialed in recent years, so it was good to see one as splendid as ‘Mojave Red Improved.’ The plants grew to a height of 18 to 20 inches and produced red, flowering stalks. It flourished regardless of miserably hot growing conditions. ‘Mojave Red Improved’ is an excellent reminder of salvia’s great qualities.Trixi® Combos Fairy – SelectaScaevola breeders have made huge leaps in developing cultivars that can withstand too much rain as well as tremendous heat. Trixi® Combos Fairy is a combination pot comprised of blue, pink, bicolor and white scaevola. The combination was absolutely perfect all summer. Too often one variety of a combination completely overwhelms the others in its mix. This was not at all the case with Fairy. Everyone behaved themselves and did not have to bully for space.Scaevola ‘Scalora Jewel’ – WestFlowers‘Scalora Jewel’ grew quickly into a compact mass of light violet, fan-like blossoms. Despite the early rains and later drought, ‘Scalora Jewel’ succeeded in wowing all summer. As with its sibling ‘Scalora Amethyst’ that won this high award last year, ‘Scalora Jewel’ is to die for.Solenostemon ‘UF12823’ Campfire – Ball FloraPlantIt was evident in early summer that this coleus would be incredible, but it continued to awe the staff throughout the summer. Campfire was maintenance free in that it seldom flowered. It grew to 3 to 3.5 inches tall and remained erect all summer. Its warm orange-red leaves shone quite brightly and it withstood long, hot days better than many other coleuses.last_img read more

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Sicklepod Weed

first_imgThe possibility of sicklepod weed becoming resistant to herbicides is a potential concern for all Georgia peanut farmers, said Eric Protsko, a weed scientist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Sicklepod weeds look similar to peanut plants, though the leaves are a little wider and a lighter green than those of the peanut plant. The weed is a concern for peanut farmers every year because the seed remains viable in the soil for at least five years and can germinate from a 5-inch soil depth. This makes the weed almost impossible to control with residual herbicides, and there are no peanut herbicides that provide adequate residual control.Sicklepod is especially threatening, considering it is self-pollinating, meaning it doesn’t require additional plants or insects to spread throughout a field. Approximately 14,000 seeds are produced per plant, far fewer seeds than Palmer amaranth.Cotton farmers have struggled to contain Roundup-resistant Palmer amaranth in recent years, and now some peanut farmers are having difficulty managing sicklepod. Through greenhouse research on the UGA Tifton Campus, Prostko is studying whether this is a production problem or a resistance issue.“Now that our senses are heightened because of our problems with Palmer amaranth, we are looking at whether every failure we’ve had has been a true herbicide resistance problem. That’s the issue,” Prostko said. “Enough people start talking about it, a couple of good growers tell you they’re experiencing management concerns, then maybe we do need to take a closer look at it.”To complete this research, Prostko, UGA graduate student Wen Carter and fellow UGA weed science researcher Bill Vencill are studying the effects of the herbicide Cadre, which may be farmers’ best treatment option against sicklepod. The research project has more than a year left before it’s complete, as 30 populations need to be screened. In some preliminary screenings, Vencill identified a few suspect sicklepod populations, according to Prostko. “However, we don’t know how widespread it is or how much of a problem it is. I think there are other issues that might be going on, such as delayed applications or reduced spray coverage at faster tractor speeds. The only way to know for sure is for us to do what we’re doing and come up with a better picture of what might be out there,” Prostko said.Timing is crucial for the researchers as they don’t want to allow the test plants to produce seeds. “If we let them go to seed, you’ve just made a big deposit in the soil seed bank, which could be a potential problem,” Prostko said.Farmers’ best mode of action is to treat with Cadre; however, those actions may be futile if resistance is truly an issue.“I wouldn’t be surprised if we had a lot of resistance because it (the herbicide) has been around a while,” Prostko said. “I try to tell growers when we’re talking to them, ‘Just because you’ve had a failure, this doesn’t mean it’s always a resistance issue.’ But if you have a good grower who’s trying to do things right, and you know that grower is a good grower, if he observes something wrong, then it does make you wonder. That’s how it starts, somebody says, ‘I’m not really seeing what I used to see. What’s going on?’”Prostko said the best time to manage sicklepod is when it’s 2 to 3 inches tall. This can be hard to see later in the year, when the peanuts are covering the ground. As the weed increases in size, the success rate of treating it decreases.“By the time you do see it, it’s up to the top of the canopy, and it’s really too big to treat,” Prostko said.last_img read more

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Indiana utility looking for 1,300MW of renewables and battery storage to replace coal generation

first_imgIndiana utility looking for 1,300MW of renewables and battery storage to replace coal generation FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Southern Indiana Gas and Electric Co. has issued a request for proposals for up to 1,300 MW of wind, solar and solar-plus-storage resources, as part of its plan to identify replacement capacity beginning in 2023.The CenterPoint Energy Inc. subsidiary is seeking 700 MW to 1,000 MW of solar and solar-plus-storage, as well as 300 MW of wind resources, according to an Aug. 12 news release.“While we continue negotiating for active projects identified in our first ever All-Source RFP, conducted as part of our most recent Integrated Resource Plan, additional projects are required to fill the remaining need,” said Steve Greenley, senior vice president of generation development.In June, the utility announced plans to retire 730 MW of coal-fired generation by 2024 and largely fill its ongoing energy need with renewable generation.[Maryam Adeeb]More ($): CenterPoint’s Ind. utility seeks up to 1,300 MW of wind, solar, storagelast_img read more

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Maximizing digital security: 5 things credit unions need to do now

first_img 25SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Albert Steed Albert Steed is Chief Information Officer for Velocity Solutions. He is responsible for providing overall strategic and operational direction for the company’s technological planning and development. Web: myvelocity.com Details  Review Your File Transfer Protocols to Avoid Debit Card Reissues Information associated with your members’ debit cards can be especially catastrophic if compromised.  Nowadays, it’s become commonplace for consumers to receive reissued debit cards in the mail with the brief explanation that their card may have been “compromised” with no further detail.  Not only does this alarm the consumer, but in this digital society, we have almost everything set on auto-pay.  We have debit cards attached to our monthly bill payments, our retail accounts at Amazon, Target, eBay, etc., and even stored for our favorite pizza delivery service! It’s an enormous hassle for consumers to update all of their profiles, and the act of reissuing mass amounts of cards is a huge financial burden to the financial institution.Careless file transfers are a leading cause of data breaches.  Carefully review your credit union’s file transfer protocols. When data is being transferred outside your firewall, be sure that your employees are utilizing secure file transfer protocols and encrypting the data. Data needs to be encrypted not only during transit but also at rest, to avoid having account numbers, tax IDs or any other sensitive data left insecure and vulnerable. If your credit union encounters a breach situation requiring thousands of debit cards to be reissued, fortunately there are financial service companies that can help you repair the resulting drop in consumer usage due to trust issues or inconvenience.  Such vendors are skilled in motivating consumers to increase their debit card usage in small steps, leading to progressively dramatic increases, and often provide the marketing tools and analysis necessary for a successful program.    Implement Defined Rules, Roles and Responsibilities for Client DataHow does your credit union handle sensitive client data? Who has access to it? And what is your security protocol? With any company that handles consumer financial information, the employees in every role – from interns to C-Levels – need to realize that such data cannot be downloaded, emailed, or saved on an external device.  Such data cannot be left on desks, displayed on computer monitors unattended, or simply discarded without first being shredded.  The reality is that most data breaches, while caused by human error, are unintentional. Or, your employees might be perfectly following your internal security protocols, but one shares the data with a vendor who then mishandles it.  While training and education help and a company-wide security policy is essential, one of the most important safeguards for preventing data breaches is to limit the access to sensitive data.  Define your roles and level of access to various data.  Perhaps you have teams within your credit union who need access to review sensitive records, but only a select few very experienced individuals should be entrusted with transferring and storing such data. It’s also critical to periodically review access levels to confidential information and adjust as necessary as roles change within your credit union.  Prioritize System Updates and Application Patching In many companies, the technical focus is often on “newness” – the newest operating system releases, new programs, new tools, new hardware, etc. And in this fast-paced digital world, it’s very tempting to shift priorities away from critical maintenance to focus your resources on what’s new and probably more exciting. Don’t let your credit union fall into this trap.  Because systems are changing and evolving so quickly, numerous vulnerabilities arise frequently in these systems and they need continuous attention and maintenance.  Firmware updates and system patching need to be kept on a disciplined schedule.  Make sure that your tech team has the resources they need to devote adequate time to maintaining your company’s infrastructure and managing all system vulnerabilities. What’s important to point out is that system patches need to be applied promptly and proactively. Even the slightest delay could result in disastrous data breaches, such as what recently happened to Equifax. In September 2017, hackers were able to access personal data of nearly 143 million Equifax customers.  The simple explanation: a flaw in a software tool that wasn’t promptly and properly patched, leaving the company’s data vulnerable.  If something so catastrophic can happen to a major credit bureau, it could certainly happen to a credit union.  A data breach can lead to loss of consumer trust, public criticism, job losses, and a devastating hit to your revenue.  If your credit union does not have a recently-updated data security policy, the time to start addressing that is now. As our digital world evolves and our day-to-day activities become increasingly facilitated by technology, the opportunities for cybercriminals to access confidential information, steal identities and misappropriate funds also increase exponentially.  Credit union executives and their technical staff need to be especially vigilant in maintaining the security and privacy of their member data. The financial services industry was the hardest-hit industry by cybercrime in 2016.  Financial services firms were breached 65% more than the average organization.  (IBM X-Force® Research: “Security Trends in the Financial Services Sector,” April 2017.) To ensure the highest level of data security and member data privacy, credit unions should make sure their security policies contain these five essential elements:  Data security needs to be a company-wide focus Years ago, before the concept of cyber security became a ubiquitous corporate concern, this type of responsibility may have been handled entirely by the IT department.  But as technology reliance has permeated almost every facet of every industry, systems have become more cloud-based and remote employee access has become more prevalent. The opportunities to infiltrate sensitive company data have increased in proportion. What is the biggest vulnerability facing financial services firms?  According to the IBM Cyber Security Intelligence Index, a whopping 95% of successful cyber-attacks are caused by human error.  Cybercriminals often target the weakest point in financial firms’ security: their employees. Through lack of proper education and communication of corporate data privacy policies, a simple mistake such as installing malware or responding to a phishing email can lead to catastrophic data breaches. Technology alone cannot prevent cyber-attacks. Every credit union needs to build its human firewall through employee education at all levels of the company, clearly communicated data policies, and an ongoing focus on data security best practices, led by each department manager.  Confirm the Security Protocols of All Parties in Your Data Chain  Credit unions face one of the greatest challenges in the data security landscape, because a major breach could compromise their members’ account information, personal information and debit card details. This is why it’s essential to perform security due diligence on all participants in your data chain: your partners, your vendors, and your vendors’ vendors – essentially any party that will be taking confidential information out of your firewall.  While there have been many large, publicized data breaches over the past few years (2016 hit record numbers), one of the biggest examples of errors made down the chain was the Scottrade Bank data breach in April 2017 that exposed the personal information of 20,000 customers.  And it wasn’t the work of highly sophisticated hackers, rather it was caused by simple human error.  A file containing the personal information of 20,000 customers was inadvertently left open to the public when a third-party vendor uploaded a file to a server without putting the proper security protocols in place. (SC Media, “Scottrade Bank Data Breach Exposes 20,000 Customers’ Personal Information,” April 2017.) Fortunately, there is an industry standard best practice for reducing third-party security risks:  requesting and reviewing each partner’s and vendor’s SOC Type 2 Report. This report lists organizational controls, puts parameters around them and is audited at least once every year. Any vendor that processes your members’ sensitive information should produce a SOC 2 report. SOC 2 reporting helps to create trust and establishes each party’s credentials for providing financial services. They demonstrate that their internal controls meet security best practices, otherwise known as the trusted services principles (TSP).  The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) defines these five TSPs as: SecurityAvailability Process IntegrityConfidentialityPrivacylast_img read more

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Homer man charged with sexual abuse

first_imgThe Sheriff’s office says the investigation revealed that Price had contact with a female juvenile between the years of 2013 and 2014. The Cortland County Sheriff’s office says they arrested 28 year-old Brandon J. Price. Price is charged with 4 counts of sex abuse in the 1st degree, a Class D Felony and 4 counts of endangering the welfare of a child, a Class A Misdemeanor. HOMER (WBNG)- A Homer man has been charged with sexual abuse towards a female juvenile. Price was arrested by the Cortland County Sheriff’s Office on April 28 and was scheduled to be arraigned at the Centralized Arraignment on April 28 at 6:30 p.m.last_img read more

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Canada finds another new flu strain in farm workers

first_imgJul 8, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Public health officials in Canada yesterday announced that they have detected a new influenza strain—one that contains human seasonal flu and a swine flu virus—in two workers on a Saskatchewan hog farm. Canada said it has notified the World Health Organization (WHO) about the new virus, as required under international health regulations. Douglas, the province’s chief veterinary officer, said in the statement, “It is important to remember that only healthy hogs go to slaughter and that pork is safe to eat. Influenza is not transmitted by eating pork products.” Initial testing on the pigs indicates they were infected with swine influenza A, common in swine herds, but not the new human strain found in the workers, the Public Health Agency said. Further surveillance will be conducted on Saskatchewan’s hog industry workers, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency is providing the province with guidance on swine herd surveillance. Saskatchewan’s health agency said in a statement yesterday that additional responses include reinforcing biosecurity measures at the affected farm and vaccinating the hog farm’s workers. The workers had mild illness and have recovered, and authorities are investigating a third suspected case, the Public Health Agency of Canada said in statement yesterday. Dr Greg Douglas, Saskatchewan’s chief veterinary officer, told Reuters today that the new virus contains genes from the seasonal human H1N1 flu strain and a triple reassortant H3N2 strain that is common in swine populations. It added that in most cases, viruses such as the one found in the hog farm workers are not transmitted easily between humans. “To date, there is no evidence that this strain has transmitted between humans,” the agency said. However, the events highlight the need for ongoing surveillance in pig populations to monitor for changes, Bridges said.center_img Jul 7 Saskatchewan Health press release Canada’s health minister Leona Ablukkaq said federal officials are working with Saskatchewan to learn more about the new virus. “Preliminary results indicate the risk to public health is low and that Canadians who have been vaccinated against the regular, seasonal flu should have some immunity to this new flu strain,” she said in the statement. The virus detected in Canadian hog farm workers is not a pandemic flu threat because it contains external human virus proteins—the part the immune system recognizes, she said. “That’s what matters most, and the flu vaccine provides good coverage. A large proportion of the population has some preexisting immunity.” Sustained transmission of the new virus among humans is unlikely, she added. Dr Carolyn Bridges, associate director of epidemiologic science in the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) influenza division, told CIDRAP News that the reassortment event in Canada isn’t surprising. “We know that humans pass influenza viruses to pigs on a regular basis,” she said, adding that the human seasonal H3N2 influenza virus first entered North American swine herds in 1998 and that multiple reassortment events have been detected since then. See also: “This is just another demonstration of how dynamic these viruses are,” Bridges said. Jul 7 Public Health Agency of Canada press releaselast_img read more

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Maurizio Sarri predicts Premier League title race after Chelsea’s defeat to Liverpool

first_img Maurizio Sarri speaks after Chelsea lose 2-0 to LiverpoolTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 4:20FullscreenMaurizio Sarri speaks after Chelsea lose 2-0 to Liverpoolhttps://metro.co.uk/video/maurizio-sarri-speaks-chelsea-lose-2-0-liverpool-1905494/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe defeat at Anfield has left Chelsea fourth in the Premier League table but they could be overtaken by both Manchester United and Arsenal if they win all of their games in hand.Asked about Chelsea’s top-four chances, Sarri said: ‘It’s not easy of course but we have to fight to the end.‘It will be very hard for every team in the last month of the season.‘We can expect very strange results in last month because we are tiring like all the other teams.’More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors Maurizio Sarri’s Chelsea were beaten by Liverpool at Anfield (Getty Images)Maurizio Sarri believes the Premier League title race is too close to call and feels the difference between Liverpool and Manchester City will be a maximum of two points.Pep Guardiola’s side briefly moved to the top of the Premier League with a 3-1 victory over Manchester City earlier on Sunday but Liverpool retook the lead with their 2-0 win against Chelsea at Anfield.Goals from Sadio Mane and Mohamed Salah were enough for Jurgen Klopp’s side to put the pressure back on City, who still have one game in hand over their rivals.Asked who he thinks will win the title after Chelsea’s defeat to Liverpool, Sarri replied: ‘It’s very difficult to say.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisement Mohamed Salah scored a stunning goal in Liverpool’s 2-0 win over Chelsea (Getty Images)‘Probably it will depend on a post in or a post out.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘It’s so close.‘The difference will be one or two points, no more.’ Commentcenter_img Metro Sport ReporterSunday 14 Apr 2019 7:33 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link573Shares Maurizio Sarri predicts Premier League title race after Chelsea’s defeat to Liverpool Advertisementlast_img read more

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