Quebec premier lashes out at media over cabinet shuffle questions

first_imgQUEBEC – Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard couldn’t hide his frustration on Thursday about the seemingly unfavourable media coverage surrounding his cabinet shuffle.Couillard wasn’t having it as he was asked by reporters about why only one member of his previous cabinet was left off the new team announced Wednesday.Rita de Santis was dropped from cabinet as Couillard added six new faces while tinkering with the responsibilities of nine other ministers.He defended the choice, pushing the combination of youth and experience in the face of numerous worldwide challenges.But the majority of the senior cabinet ministers — education, justice, health, and finance among them — all kept their posts.Couillard lashed out at reporters asking him about the makeup of his cabinet, suggesting the media were out for blood.“What is it you want, you folks in the media?,” he said. “You’re looking for a pound of flesh? A little blood on the table? Is that what you’re interested in? You want human drama. Is that what excites you a bit? You want (to write) nice articles on that?”“I prefer to talk about people’s competency… If it’s a demotion contest, I’m not playing this game. I’m playing at construction.”The opposition has claimed that Couillard’s Liberals are worn out a year away from the provincial election next October.The Parti Quebecois has said nothing changed with the shuffle, given that 92 per cent of the government’s budget remains in the hands of the same ministers.last_img read more

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Accused sailor testifies sex on Canadian destroyer was consensual

first_imgHALIFAX – A Halifax sailor accused of sexually assaulting a subordinate testified Friday that the sex was consensual, as he took the stand in his own defence at his court martial.Master Seaman Daniel Cooper testified in a Halifax military court that he had asked the leading seaman — who was an ordinary seaman at the time of the alleged incident — if he wanted to become intimate, and that he agreed.“As far as I could tell … he was receptive to what I was proposing,” said Cooper, who is accused of a sexual assaulting the subordinate aboard HMCS Athabaskan while the destroyer was visiting Spain as part of a NATO exercise on Nov. 9, 2015.Cooper told Military Judge Cmdr. Sandra Sukstorf that the men had been drinking at a hotel and restaurant in Rota, Spain, and later had more drinks in the ship’s cafeteria.“(He) sat down next to me and put his arm around my shoulder,” said Cooper, adding that the man then asked him if he was gay.“I was a little taken aback because I didn’t know him very well. It’s not something I was very open about to people in the department.”He said when they eventually went to their sleeping quarters in the early hours of Nov. 10, he noticed the junior sailor — whose name is protected by a publication ban — had become aroused as they were talking near the bunks, and so he asked if he wanted to engage in sexual activity.Cooper, a naval communicator at Canadian Forces Base Halifax, said the man responded “Yes,” and then he followed him to his bunk, asking him another time if he wanted to become intimate before climbing into the bunk with him.“I generally prefer not to get involved with people from work. But I was drunk and inhibitions were relaxed,” he said.He said he performed oral sex on the subordinate, and that the man never told him to stop until about 10 minutes later when he sat up and said, “I’m not gay,” at which point Cooper said he immediately returned to his own bunk.Cooper has pleaded not guilty to sexual assault and ill treatment of a subordinate.Prosecutor Maj. Dominic Martin opened his cross-examination by showing portions of an interview Cooper gave to an investigator in March 2016.In the video, Cooper denies any sexual activity took place between him and the alleged victim.Most details in his account of day in question were consistent with his testimony on the stand, but he told the investigator he went directly to bed after they arrived in the sleeping quarters.Martin did not begin questioning Cooper Friday. His cross-examination will continue Saturday.On Wednesday, the alleged victim told the military court he woke up in his bunk to a superior sailor performing oral sex on him. He said it was dark and he couldn’t really see, but the person performing the act was repeating a sexual phrase to him, and he recognized the voice to be that of Cooper.He became emotional in the courtroom as he spoke about fearing for his safety and attempting to alert a crew member in the bunk below him — but he said his pleas for help went unanswered.“I said, ‘I think I’m getting raped’ … But he didn’t believe me. His response was, ‘You’re drunk and I have duty in a few hours. Go back to bed’,” he said.Earlier Friday, the sailor from the lower bunk was called to the stand by prosecutor Capt. Erica Maidment.The able seaman — who was an ordinary seaman at the time — testified that he remembered the alleged victim attempting to wake him up on the morning in question.“I thought he was just being drunk and stupid,” he told the court. “I just told him to stop.”The sailor said the commotion lasted for about 5 or 10 minutes, but later said under cross-examination by defence lawyer Maj. Philippe-Luc Boutin that it lasted for about 15 or 20 minutes.The alleged victim had told the court the incident lasted a few minutes.The bunkmate also said he heard moaning, “like he was trying to get attention … not pain or pleasure,” and eventually saw a pair of legs come out of the rack above him. That’s when he asked the fellow sailor what had happened.“He seemed to be in shock more than anything,” he said, adding the sailor said someone had been performing oral sex on him.He said the two men then reported the incident to a superior.Military commanders have promised to crack down on sexual misconduct in the ranks since retired Supreme Court justice Marie Deschamps reported in April 2015 that she had found an “underlying sexual culture” in the military.Military police received 193 reports of sexual assault in 2017, more than twice the 93 reported in 2014. There have also been more charges, with 44 in 2016 compared to 24 in 2014.Follow (at)AlyThomson on Twitter.last_img read more

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Flights cancelled in Nova Scotia New Brunswick ahead of intense winter storm

first_imgHALIFAX – Airlines have already cancelled flights ahead of an intense winter storm that’s expected to bring heavy snow, high winds and pounding surf to Atlantic Canada.Environment Canada has issued a slew of warnings for the Maritime provinces, with up to 25 centimetres of snow expected in some areas starting late Tuesday afternoon and persisting into Wednesday.The national weather forecaster was also predicting potentially damaging high winds that could gust up to 110 kilometres an hour in Nova Scotia.Higher than normal water levels and pounding surf could also cause flooding in coastal areas during high tide.Cancellations at Halifax Stanfield International Airport and Fredericton International Airport were already piling up Tuesday morning, hours before the first snowflake fell.The Confederation Bridge between New Brunswick to P.E.I. also warned of possible restrictions on traffic later Tuesday.Nova Scotia Power had set up an emergency operations centre on Monday evening, warning customers to prepare for power outages.The centre is used to co-ordinate power outage restoration and to liaise with the Nova Scotia Emergency Management Office.The utility says powerline crews and forestry teams have been positioned across the province.The storm is the third winter wallop to hit the Maritimes in as many days.Environment Canada was also calling for high winds gusting up to 100 kilometres an hour in Newfoundland on Wednesday.last_img read more

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One hunter dead two injured after Nunavut polar bear attack

first_imgIQALUIT, Nunavut – Nunavut officials are investigating a polar bear attack that left one Inuit hunter dead and two injured.RCMP say the attack happened some time last week near the community of Naujaat, on the northernmost shore of Hudson Bay.The three hunters left the community last week and did not return as expected last Thursday.Search-and-rescue aircraft eventually found the hunters on White Island, about 80 kilometres from the community.The two survivors had minor injuries.RCMP continue to investigate and Nunavut Environment officials are now on the scene.last_img read more

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Human rights board finds Nova Scotia discriminated against wheelchair users

first_imgHALIFAX – The Nova Scotia government discriminated against people in wheelchairs by failing to enforce a regulation requiring restaurants to have accessible bathrooms, a human rights board of inquiry has found.The independent board of inquiry said in a decision released late Thursday that the province did not regulate food safety provisions related to having accessible washrooms in restaurants with patios.As a result, chairwoman Gail Gatchalian ordered the province to interpret, administer and enforce the regulations as they appear.“The respondent discriminated against individuals who use wheelchairs for mobility in its administration and enforcement … of the Food Safety Regulations contrary to … the Human Rights Act,” she wrote in the decision, released through the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission.She also ordered that each of the five complainants receive $1,000 in general damages.The five complainants, who all have disabilities and use wheelchairs, argued that the language in the regulation is vague and does not take the experiences of people with disabilities into account.They also said the lack of an accessible washroom prevents them from washing their hands before eating.“This poses a health risk for the individual, and a potential health risk for others,” Gatchalian wrote. “The Restaurant Association is supportive of the idea that restaurants should be accessible.”The association, however, was concerned about the cost of requiring restaurants to have washroom facilities for the public that are accessible to wheelchairs users.As an example, it said the cost to renovate a restaurant to be accessible was $135,000.The association said there are more than 100 accessible food establishments within a five-kilometre radius of downtown Halifax.Under Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act, food establishments must have washrooms available for the public in a “convenient location,” unless exempted by an administrator.But while the regulation requires restaurants to have their bathrooms conveniently located, one complainant said that sometimes they are inconvenient — even inaccessible — for people with disabilities.Some establishments have their washrooms up or down a set of stairs in a building that doesn’t have an elevator, while others may have doors that are difficult to open or stalls that aren’t wide enough.last_img read more

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FBI rejects young mans claim to be longmissing boy

first_imgAt Greenman Elementary after the boy’s disappearance, Timmothy’s schoolmates, teachers and parents tied hundreds of yellow ribbons around trees and signs. A garden was planted in his memory.The brief but tantalizing possibility that the case had been solved generated excitement in Timmothy’s former neighborhood.Pedro Melendez, who lives in Timmothy’s former home, didn’t know the boy but saved the concrete slab with his name, handprint and footprint etched in it when he redid the back patio. It is dated ’09.Linda Ramirez, who lives nearby and knew the family, said she was “pretty excited” but didn’t “want to have false hopes.”Rowley expressed hope that the flurry of activity and attention had renewed interest in the case.“Perhaps, it has people looking at the case with new eyes,” the police sergeant said.___Babwin reported from Chicago. Associated Press reporters Carrie Antlfinger in Aurora, Caryn Rousseau in Chicago and Corey Williams in Detroit contributed. CINCINNATI (AP) — A young man’s claim to be an Illinois boy who disappeared under tragic circumstances eight years ago was disproved by DNA tests and pronounced a hoax Thursday, dashing hopes that the baffling case had finally been solved.For a day and a half, a breakthrough seemed to be at hand when a young man found wandering the streets of Newport, Kentucky, on Wednesday identified himself as 14-year-old Timmothy Pitzen and told police he had just escaped from two men who had held him captive for seven years.RELATED: 14-year-old says he is Illinois boy who went missing in 2011Timmothy disappeared in 2011 at age 6, apparently sent into hiding by his mother just before she took her own life. Timmothy’s family was cautiously hopeful over Wednesday’s news, as were neighbors and others who have long wondered whether he is dead or alive.But the FBI said Thursday afternoon that DNA tests determined the young man was not Timmothy.Newport Police Chief Tom Collins identified him to ABC as Brian Rini of Medina, Ohio, a 23-year-old ex-convict. He was released from an Ohio prison less than a month ago after serving more than a year for burglary and vandalism.Authorities did not say whether Rini would face charges over the alleged hoax or what his motive was.“Law enforcement has not and will not forget Timmothy, and we hope to one day reunite him with his family. Unfortunately, that day will not be today,” FBI spokesman Timothy Beam said in a statement.In Timmothy’s hometown of Aurora, Illinois, police Sgt. Bill Rowley said that over the years his department has received thousands of tips about Timmothy, including false sightings.“We’re always worried about copycats, especially something that has a big national attention like this,” he said.Timmothy’s family members said they were heartbroken at the latest twist.“It’s devastating. It’s like reliving that day all over again, and Timmothy’s father is devastated once again,” said his aunt Kara Jacobs.The boy’s grandmother Alana Anderson said: “It’s been awful. We’ve been on tenterhooks, hopeful and frightened. It’s just been exhausting.” She added, “I feel so sorry for the young man who’s obviously had a horrible time and felt the need to say he was somebody else.”Timmothy vanished after his mother, Amy Fry-Pitzen, pulled him out of kindergarten early one day, took him on a two-day road trip to the zoo and a water park, and then killed herself at a hotel. She left a note saying that her son was safe with people who would love and care for him, and added: “You will never find him.”Police have said she might have dropped the boy off with a friend, noting that his car seat and Spider-Man backpack were gone.RELATED: Police, FBI trying to verify teen is boy missing since 2011Timmothy’s grandmother said her daughter had fought depression for years and was having problems in her marriage to Timmothy’s father. News reports suggested she was afraid she would lose custody of the boy in a divorce because of her mental instability.last_img read more

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Federal judge orders changes to election rules for PEI First Nation

first_imgCHARLOTTETOWN — A Federal Court judge has ruled that regulations blocking off-reserve members of a P.E.I. First Nation from taking part in band elections are contrary to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.The Abegweit First Nation has three reserves on the Island — in Morell, Scotchford and Rocky Point — but about half its members live off-reserve.The band’s election regulations prevented anyone who had not lived on-reserve for the six months prior to an election from voting for chief and band councillors, or from running for those positions.Justice Paul Favel ruled that the equality rights of off-reserve members were violated and ordered the rules to be changed, with the exception of how they apply to choosing a chief.Candidates for chief must have lived on-reserve for the six months prior to an election, and agree to reside on-reserve during their elected term.A band council election set for April 17 was put on hold while the judicial review was heard. A new date has not been set.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Newmans Own Foundation Celebrates 30 Years With 30 Million

first_imgNewman’s Own Foundation has made a commitment to donate $30 million to charity this year, in recognition of the 30th anniversary of the founding of Newman’s Own. This milestone represents the largest amount of money Newman’s Own Foundation has donated in a single year.To kick off “30 Years of Giving,” which continues throughout 2012, Newman’s Own Foundation has announced an initial round of grants totaling approximately $10 million. In this initial round, significant contributions are being made in support of nutrition, children with life-limiting conditions, empowerment, and the encouragement of philanthropy. These four “high impact areas” represent a refined focus for the Foundation. Examples of grantees in each of these four areas include:Nutrition: Food Research and Action Center, The Food Trust, Wholesome WaveChildren with Life-Limiting Conditions: SeriousFun Children’s Network (formerly Association of Hole in the Wall Camps), Friends of Green ChimneysEmpowerment: The Discovery Center, Safe Water Network, Shining Hope for Communities, Right To PlayEncouraging Philanthropy: Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy, generationOn, Dynamo Academy, Newman’s Own Foundation Campus Community Service ChallengeNewman’s Own Foundation, founded by the late Paul Newman, is focusing on these four areas because they represent the scope of organizations Newman originally supported, as well as opportunities for the Foundation to have an impact.Since Paul Newman founded his food company, Newman’s Own, Inc. in 1982, Newman and Newman’s Own Foundation have donated more than $350 million to thousands of charities worldwide. Newman established the Foundation in 2005, as a means of continuing his pledge to donate to charity all net profits and royalties from the sale of products from Newman’s Own, Inc.“Paul went against conventional wisdom by creating all-natural food products and giving 100% of the profits to charity,” said Robert H. Forrester, President and CEO of Newman’s Own Foundation. “Early on, someone asked Paul whether a company that gives all of its profits away could survive. Thirty years later, we have not only survived, but grown and, as a result, helped thousands of organizations make a difference in the lives of others. In the first year, Paul donated around $300,000, and this year it will be 100 times that amount.”Newman’s business model was unique when he started the company. Now, there is a rising tide of similar social business enterprises. Many organizations cite Paul Newman and Newman’s Own as a source of inspiration.Today, the legacy continues. All after-tax profits and royalties from the sale of Newman’s Own products go to charity, helping to fulfill Newman’s commitment to do his part to help make our world a better place. The impact is best summarized with just a few examples from the thousands of programs that have benefited from funding: children with life-limiting medical conditions attend special camps where kids get to be kids instead of patients; wounded warriors and their families are empowered to overcome extraordinary circumstances; hungry children receive wholesome breakfast to nourish their bodies and their brains; residents of Africa’s largest slum experience hope through education, healthcare, and clean water; and young people around the world commit to creating social change.last_img read more

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Stars Play Charity Golf For Caudwell Children

first_imgStars of stage, screen and sport headed to Loch Lomond last week to take part in the annual Caudwell Children Celebrity Golf Classic and helped raise thousands for disabled children.Jonathan Wilkes, Mikey Graham, Ant McPartlin, Trudi Beswick, Declan Donnelly, Ben ShephardCredit/Copyright: CIA Photography via Caudwell ChildrenCelebrities including Ant & Dec, Ben Shephard and Jonathan Wilkes joined Boyzone’s Mikey Graham, the host of the glamorous annual event at The Carrick golf course on Thursday 27th and Friday 28th.Mikey Graham Plays Golf For Caudwell ChildrenCredit/Copyright: CIA Photography via Caudwell ChildrenEach celebrity played with a team of three paying guests and competed over two days against the stunning backdrop of the Scottish Highlands. The teams also enjoyed two nights at the five-star De Vere Cameron House Hotel including a gala dinner and awards presentation.Dec Donnelly Plays Charity GolfCredit/Copyright: CIA Photography via Caudwell ChildrenHosting the event again was the Irish singer songwriter, Mikey Graham, he said: “We’ve had another great couple of days at this year’s event, with a fantastic bunch of celebrities joining me on the course.”Other celebrities attending the sporting fundrasier included Olympian Louise Hazel and the twin stars of Harry Potter, James and Oliver Phelps.Local celebrities joining the all-star event are ex Scottish international footballers Andy Goram, Alan Rough and Derek Johnstone and boxer Ian McLeod.Money raised over the two days will be donated directly to national charity, Caudwell Children.Trudi Beswick, CEO of Caudwell Children, said: “We are thrilled with the turn out for this year’s golf event and we’re delighted to return to Loch Lomond. The event raises vital funds to provide practical and emotional support for sick and disabled children right across the country, we can’t thank our guests enough for their continued support.”For more information contact the charity events team on events@caudwellchildren.com or call 01782 600611.last_img read more

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Go Backstage With Beyonce For Charity

first_imgHave you got style like Beyoncé? A new online auction is giving you the chance to see what it’s like to work backstage on the biggest show of the year—The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour!Beyoncé invites you backstage as a VIP on her style team. You’ll be a part of the Mrs. Carter Show as you spend time with the Creative Director of Wardrobe, Tina Knowles. See a major tour from behind the scenes, meet Beyoncé and take your 2 VIP seats for this year’s biggest show!• Winner and their guest will spend time behind the scenes on July 29 in Washington, DC as part of the Tina Knowles’ Styling Team on the North American leg of the Mrs. Carter Show World Tour, 2013. • Winner and their guest will have a meet and greet with Beyoncé, as well as a photo opportunity back stage. • Have lunch with award-winning designer, Tina Knowles! • Take a tour of the wardrobe rooms and get an insider’s perspective to learn what goes into designing all the incredible costumes and show-stopping stage looks! • After your guided tour, you can sit back and experience the show with two VIP tickets. • Receive a Mrs. Carter Show World Tour “gift bag” filled with music, tour memorabilia and some of Beyoncé’s favorite things to have while she is on the road.Proceeds from the auction will benefit Miss A Meal. With economic downtimes increasing and the unemployment becoming the norm for so many people, iconic entertainer and performer Beyoncé along with her mom, award-winning fashion designer Tina Knowles and entertainers Solange Knowles, Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams have all joined forces with Bread of Life, Inc. the Houston-based non-profit organization founded by Rudy and Juanita Rasmus, to fight for the needs of the less fortunate with a fundraising campaign they call Miss A Meal.The auction is open until July 11, and can be accessed via CharityBuzz.com.last_img read more

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Dustin Lance Black to Dedicate Historic Marker to First LGBT National March

first_imgThe Equality Forum, the nation’s premier lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights summit, announced today that Academy Award-winning screenwriter and LGBT activist, Dustin Lance Black, will serve as the keynote speaker for the Philadelphia Conference Historic Marker Dedication slated for Wednesday, July 27th from 11:00 – 11:30 am (ET) at the Arch Street Meeting House (320 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106).The Philadelphia Conference Historic Marker will designate where 300 activists from around the country met in February 1979 to organize the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. The seminal 100,000-person demonstration, which took place on October 14, 1979, defined a national civil rights movement. A leader for a march on the National Mall was San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk. When he was assassinated in November 1978, San Francisco activists called for a Philadelphia Conference to fulfill his dream.“For the LGBT civil rights movement, the Philadelphia Conference is akin to Seneca Falls,” said Malcolm Lazin, Equality Forum’s Founder and Executive Director. “Given Dustin’s Oscar-winning biopic of the late civil rights activist Harvey Milk, whose assassination inspired LGBT activists prompting the organization of the Philadelphia Conference, it’s an honor to have him dedicating this historic marker.”Lazin recently penned an op-ed on Huffington Post, Stonewall Isn’t the Only LGBT Site Worthy of National Monument Status, writing that “the efforts to record LGBT civil rights sites and events marks an important turning point in recognition and respect.”Dustin Lance Black is a screenwriter, filmmaker and social activist. He has won the Academy Award and two WGA Awards for Best Original Screenplay for MILK. He is also a founding board member of the American Foundation for Equal Rights (AFER), which successfully led the federal cases for marriage equality in California and Virginia with lawyers David Boise and Ted Olson, putting an end to California’s discriminatory Proposition 8.Black topped the list of OUT Magazine’s 40 under 40, and has repeatedly been named “one of the 50 most powerful LGBT people in America today.”last_img read more

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Jason Mraz To Perform At 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games Opening

first_imgThe world’s largest sports and humanitarian event this year – the 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Austria – today announced two very special performances for the event’s Opening Ceremony on Saturday, March 18, 2017.Performers include multi-Grammy award-winning folk-pop songsmith Jason Mraz and 13-year old winner of America’s Got Talent Grace VanderWaal.Nearly 2,700 athletes and 1,000 coaches representing 107 nations will be welcomed at the Opening Ceremony, held at the Planai Stadium in Schladming, a regular stop on the World Cup circuit and site of the 2013 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships.To honor the athletes, Jason Mraz will be planning a special performance which will be a powerful unification of Special Olympics youth/athletes and the groundbreaking new music and arts education program that is supported by the Jason Mraz Foundation, called LIVE ART. Children from a local Schladming music program will also participate in the performance. Mraz will perform his record-setting song, “I’m Yours,” as well as his hit song “I Won’t Give Up” – which he will perform alongside VanderWaal, LIVE ART participants and the local Schladming choir.“I’m incredibly honored to be asked to perform during the Opening Ceremony, celebrating the courage, determination and spirit of every Special Olympics athlete who traveled to compete in these Games,” said Jason Mraz. “Special Olympics is an organization that I feel embraces the skills and talents of every person and I do the same thing through my work with LIVE ART.”LIVE ART is an equally inclusive program for both students with and without disabilities, of all ages, who work together for a year using performing arts to share messages of acceptance, compassion and empathy. Mraz works as an artistic advisor and funder alongside LIVE ART Director Erin Thomas-Foley, creating an inspiring culminating performance each year featuring nationally recognized recording artists performing with the students. The program is produced by SPARC, The School of the Performing Arts in Richmond, Virginia where Jason studied as a child. www.sparconline.org/liveart.Princess Charlene of Monaco, Special Olympics Global Ambassador and Olympic Gold Medalist Hannah Teter, American short track speed skating Olympic champion Apolo Ohno, Hall of Famer and Special Olympics Global Ambassador and Board Member Dikembe Mutombo, Olympic figure-skating legend and Special Olympics International Board Member Michelle Kwan and NBA Legend and Special Olympics International Board Member Sam Perkins, and other distinguished personalities will cheer on the athletes at the Planai. A global audience can watch coverage provided by ESPN, an official broadcast partner of the World Games. ESPN is distributing the Opening Ceremony around the world in multiple languages. Tickets to the Opening Ceremony and this once-in-a-lifetime experience are available for purchase via www.oeticket.com.More than 20,000 fans including families, volunteers, Heads of State, Ministers of Sport, and celebrities including trainer and television personality Jillian Michaels and ballroom dance champion, professional dancer and choreographer Louie Van Amstel will attend the Games and cheer on the athletes over the eight days of competition.“The whole world will come to Austria and will celebrate a big sports and social event with us. We look forward to welcoming all athletes and coaches and guests in Graz, Schladming and Ramsau,” said Marc Angelini and Max Pichler, the two CEOs from Austria2017.More than four years preparation are nearly over and the Organizing Committee is ready for the Games. Angelini and Pichler added, “We hope that it’s going to be an unforgettable event for everybody!”Specific details of the night’s event, which will include the Parade of Athletes and culmination of the Final Leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run that will light the World Games cauldron, are being kept under wraps until closer to the event.The World Games will be hosted from 14 March-25 March and feature 9 Olympic-style sports: Floorball, Floor Hockey, Stick Shooting, Figure Skating, Short Track Speed Skating, Alpine Skiing, Snowboarding, Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. These Games will showcase the unlimited potential of people with intellectual disabilities – the largest disability population in the world. Competitions will take place in the cities of Graz, Schladming, Rohrmoos and Ramsau. All competitions are free and open to the public. Plan your outing to support the athletes by checking out the competition schedule here: Austria 2017 Games Schedule.The Opening Ceremony will take place at the Planai Stadium in Schladming, Austria on Saturday, March 18, 2017 starting at 2:00 p.m. EST/7:00 p.m. local Austrian time and will be brought to a worldwide audience by ESPN and local Austrian broadcast partner ORF. To learn more and purchase tickets, visit www.oeticket.com. Please visit www.austria2017.org for additional updates to Opening Ceremony performances.Earlier this week, Special Olympics announced the first-ever social fundraising collaboration with GoFundMe. As part of the effort, nearly 500 GoFundMes are being created by teams, coaches, as well as by Olympians, top professional athletes, YouTube stars and other influencers to support athletes attending the Special Olympics World Winter Games in Austria next month. To donate and learn more about the athlete stories, and view all Special Olympic GoFundMes, visit: gofundme.com/specialolympics.last_img read more

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Angela Bassett And LaTanya Richardson Jackson To Be Honored At LadyLike Foundation

first_imgActress/Philanthropist Angela Bassett, Actress/Philanthropist Pauletta Pearson Washington, BET Networks Chair and CEO Debra Lee and Actress/Philanthropist LaTanya Richardson Jackson will be honored at the 10th Annual Women of Excellence Awards Luncheon, it was announced by LadyLike Foundation’s President and CEO, Leah Pump.LadyLike Foundation will confer the honors on Saturday, June 2, 2018 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel’s International Ballroom. Holly Robinson-Peete serves as the luncheon’s emcee. The event is expected to raise a half million dollars for the nonprofit organization whose mission is to educate, empower and inspire young girls living in underprivileged communities around the Greater Los Angeles area. Funds raised at the luncheon enable LadyLike Foundation to provide five scholarships to college bound young ladies from the inner city of Los Angeles.“We are thrilled to honor Angela Bassett,” says Leah Pump. “Her excellence as an actress, wife, mother and philanthropist, is an inspiration to so many of the young ladies our organization serves. Angela Bassett is one of the most celebrated actresses of our time, who stars in blockbuster films, yet one of the most gratifying moments of her career was merging her faith and talent, giving voice to various characters in the all-time best selling audiobook, THE BIBLE EXPERIENCE. Ms. Bassett truly embodies the Woman of Excellence.”Broadway, film and television actress Pauletta Pearson Washington will be honored for “her Excellence as an actress, wife and mother and for being one of the kindest and most philanthropic women I know,” says Ms. Pump.As BET Networks Chairman and CEO, Debra L. Lee is one of the most powerful and influential people in entertainment. “Throughout her career, Ms. Lee has set patterns of excellence with BET Networks’ programming and corporate philanthropy. She is a trailblazer who has inspired so many young ladies, especially African-American girls, to aspire to a career as top executives in corporate entertainment, a field once so heavily dominated by men. Ms. Lee truly shattered the glass ceiling with her monumental achievements. We are excited to honor her as a Woman of Excellence,” says Ms. Pump.“Tony Award-nominated actress LaTanya Richardson Jackson is a true inspiration to young women, that even with tremendous career success, one should always find time to give back,” says Ms. Pump. “She and her husband, Samuel L. Jackson established the Samuel L. & LaTanya R. Jackson Foundation to carry out their commitment to a range of philanthropic issues in the United States and Africa. LaTanya has received a number of awards for her philanthropic work including The United Negro College Fund, and the N.Y. Keeper of the Dream Award. We feel privileged to honor her as a Woman of Excellence.”The LadyLike Foundation is a faith-based nonprofit organization whose purpose is to educate, empower and inspire young women living in underprivileged communities. Through cutting edge resource programs, workshops, mentorships and life lessons, young ladies are challenged to reach their highest potential and become the successful, well-rounded “Lady” they were created to be. The organization’s Women of Excellence Luncheon is the primary fundraiser for LadyLike Foundation.last_img read more

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Calgary actor Steven Ogg winning fans with his charismatic Walking Dead villain

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement “People are saying ‘Would you like me to bring you some Scotch?’ and all of that on the old Twittersphere,” says Ogg. “People bring you all kinds of funny things.” It all stems from one of Calgary-born actor Steven Ogg’s scene-stealing moments as Simon on the Walking Dead. As the right-hand man to the maniacal Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) and a high-ranking member of the Saviors, Simon was put in charge of one of the many raids of the Hilltop Colony in a tense but funny episode that ran in late November.During his time in the peaceful community, the ruthless Simon ends up depriving Hilltop leader Gregory (Xander Berkeley) of his precious stash of Scotch. Gregory, who is both arrogant and spineless, accidentally reveals the treasure while attempting to betray two of our hero apocalypse survivors, Maggie and Sasha, who he thought were hiding in the closet.With a perfect mix of venom and charm, Simon accepts the bottles of scotch and then makes Gregory bow at his feet. Now, as fans prepare to see Ogg at an upcoming Walker Stalker conference in London, they may come with their own respectful offerings. Twitterlast_img read more

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The Video and Text Of Mélanie Jolys Speech Outlining Our Cultural Future

first_img Twitter SpeechFrom Canadian HeritageSeptember 28, 2017 – Ottawa, Ontario Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement IntroductionLadies and gentlemenMesdames et messieursThank you for being here in person or joining us live.I want to begin by acknowledging that we are gathered on the traditional territory of the Algonquin Peoples.History of our systemLet me start with a question. Two questions, actually.Why has culture always mattered to Canadians?Why should it matter now?The answers to these questions are, fundamentally, about who we are and who we want to be.We are a small, diverse population spread over a large land mass.We are all bound by reconciliation. Indigenous Peoples lived on this land for thousands of years before the arrival of settlers and the founding of Canada.We are a country rooted in our linguistic duality. English and French are at the heart of who we are. We celebrate the fact that eight million Francophones have a vibrant culture all the while surrounded by millions of English-language speakers.We are a democracy. We believe in and promote gender and racial equality, and human rights. We promote these values to the world.We are a culturally diverse country that welcomes immigrants. We are a country that looks like the world.All of these strengths make our culture—and our identity—dynamic.They make us unique.And we’ve spent the last 80 years developing cultural policies that preserve these strengths.A good part of this work has been done in the shadow of the largest English-language content producer in the world—the United States.Canada has long understood the need to promote Canadian culture. To build identity, pride and a shared sense of values.From the very first national cultural institutions founded in our country, the government’s goal was to create a space for Canadian voices.This goal was top-of-mind when Parliament adopted Canada’s first Radio Broadcasting Act in 1932—and launched CBC/Radio-Canada four years later.We knew then, as we do now, that Canadians need access to a system of broadcasting from Canadian sources.Other federal institutions and laws followed. The National Film Board. Telefilm. The Canada Council for the Arts. The CRTC. The Official Languages Act. The Multiculturalism Act. The Museums Act.Our policies have evolved over time to reflect shifting Canadian identities and values: our commitment, enshrined in legislation, to official languages, and to pluralism. And more recently, our commitment to responding to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.The digital shiftToday, we find ourselves in another shift.We listen to radio, watch TV, go to the movies. We visit museums, read books and magazines.More and more, we have the opportunity to do these online.When it comes to content, Canadians want choice.But we know that access and affordability of Internet and wireless are real issues for many.Broadband coverage is uneven across the country.We pay some of the highest rates in the world.Our government won’t increase the cost of these services to Canadians by imposing a new tax.We’ve lowered taxes for the middle class, and we will continue to do that.However, we will make sure our creative industries succeed and make the content that we love—by using all of the tools we have.When Canadians are asked to give great Canadian content, it’s amazing how many talk about the books, shows, movies and songs they loved as kids: Passe-Partout. Mr. Dressup. Takuginai. The Log Driver’s Waltz. Anne of Green Gables, or, as I knew it as a child, Anne…la maison aux pignons verts.For me, this speaks to how important it is for our children to see and hear stories that reflect back who we are as they are growing up.And it’s no different now than it was on the floor of the House of Commons in 1932 when the government of the day adopted the first Radio Broadcasting Act.Strength and disruption in our creative industriesThe arts and culture sector provides jobs for more than 630,000 Canadians.It’s a $54.6-billion-dollar industry.And there are thousands more working in new fields. Like the 20,000 Canadians designing and composing for video games.These are the jobs of tomorrow.And not just in big cities: Northern Ontario hosted 28 full-length productions in 2016. Shows such as CTV’s Cardinal, Hallmark’s Flower Shop Mysteries and CraveTV’s Letterkenny employed 1,530 people.Our industries are doing well—not just well, great.Two Sundays ago, Montréal writer Louise Penny took over the #1 spot on the New York Times best seller list for her book Glass Houses;At the same time, young Canadian poet Rupi Kaur was #13 – remarkably, it was her 34th consecutive week on the best seller list;The same night, Margaret Atwood, Lorne Michaels and director Jean-Marc Vallée were each feted at the Emmy Awards. A few days earlier it was announced that Donald Sutherland would be receiving an honorary Oscar.These are incredible, internationally recognized accomplishments.Still, I know there is anxiety here at home.For creative industries that were born digital or have made the shift, the change has brought expansion, new jobs and new markets: we are leading in gaming, post-production and animation.In others—like media and broadcasting—the transition is more disruptive.Today, Facebook, Netflix, Spotify and YouTube reach Canadians directly—outside of our traditional regulated system.That content is predominantly English, mostly developed outside of Canada. So this disruption plays out differently in our French- and English-language markets.It is also experienced differently in urban and rural areas of the country where broadband isn’t as readily available.We must take these realities into account.And we must act.If we’re complacent, this new wave of information can drown out our own content—our French-language TV and films; our Indigenous music; our multicultural programming.This worries me. It worries our creators. And it worries Canadians.Because we care about Canadian content. We are fiercely proud of our stories and our talent.We will continue to champion the Internet as a progressive force and an open space without barriers.As a government, we stand by the principle of net neutrality.At the same time, we are fierce advocates of the importance of cultural diversity. We are champions for our creative industries.We must find a new way—a Canadian way—to support our content creators, to ensure they can compete, and to create a space for them in markets and platforms at home and around the world.Our vision for a Creative CanadaToday, I am announcing our Government’s vision for a Creative Canada.Creative Canada sets the policy direction for our programs, legislation and Portfolio agencies for the coming years.And it includes new initiatives and new funding to get us there.In our vision, Canada is a world leader in the quality of its creative industries, with creators empowered to make great content that stands out at home and around the world; and,That Canada is a pioneer in ensuring there is a space online for a diversity of voices at home and abroad, including Canadian content in French and English, multicultural and Indigenous expression.This is our vision.It is ambitious. It should be.Creative Canada will focus our efforts on three things:We will invest in our creators and their stories.We will promote the discovery and distribution of Canadian content at home and abroad.And we will strengthen public broadcasting and support local news.I’ll talk about each one of these.First…Pillar 1: Invest in Canadian creators, cultural entrepreneurs and their storiesThe talent and imagination of our creators is at the heart of our approach.From the first days of our government, we made a historic investment of $1.9 billion in new funds in the arts and culture.But there is more to do.Our new approach will help creators develop new ideas, take risks and make content that stands out.Increase funding to the Canada Media Fund (CMF)It begins with addressing deep anxieties I’ve heard across the sector, especially about funding for independent production.Writers, producers and directors have serious concerns about whether there will be a domestic market for their work, especially in the face of declining private-sector cable and satellite subscription revenues that contribute to the CMF.We are turning that around.Today, I’m announcing that, starting in 2018, the Government will increase the federal contribution to maintain the level of funding in the Canada Media Fund to counter these declines.Last year, the CMF supported 28,000 industry jobs in projects like Kim’s Convenience, Orphan Black, 19-2, Unité 9 and Mohawk Girls.With this new funding, we’re investing in jobs for our writers, showrunners, producers, directors, actors and crews.So whether your job depends on building a set, catering for the crew or standing in front of the camera, we want to make sure you know we believe in the strength of our production sector and its importance to our communities.This increase in funding will allow us to see what the next few years bring in the industry, and to work together to develop a model that will be viable for the CMF over the long term.Support skills, development, innovation and collaborationGreat productions rely on great stories, and the talent and time needed to develop them.Creators and producers across the country told me we need to do more to support great stories at their roots.I heard repeatedly how hard it is to get seed money to get a script or a pitch off the ground.That’s why we will also work with the CMF and explore what more might be done to enhance early-stage development such as scriptwriting.In music, we’ll help artists and entrepreneurs develop the skills they need to promote their music at home and connect with fans in new markets.Through the Canada Book Fund, we’ll continue to support print and digital production and will experiment with innovative approaches to marketing and promoting Canadian books.And we’ll cut the red tape no one likes: we will improve the administration of the film and TV production tax credits by CAVCO. We will work with Telefilm to explore ways to streamline the application process.In all of our programs, we will continue to make sure that they support work that reflects Canada in all its diversity, including Indigenous-led production, work in both of our official languages, and work that represents our multicultural fabric.And we will work with our Portfolio organizations and other partners to achieve greater gender parity in our creative industries.Support for the next generation of cultural spaces: Creative HubsIn the tech sector, entrepreneurs benefit from a start-up culture to nurture new ideas.They have incubators where they can grow their businesses.We need these same networks to grow our creative industries: collaborative spaces where creative entrepreneurs can access tools, training, equipment and mentorship.This year, we announced $300 million in new funding to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund.Today, we’re setting aside part of this investment for new creative hubs to incubate the next generation of creative start-ups.Places like 312 Main in Vancouver’s downtown eastside, la SAT in Montréal, or cSPACE King Edward in Calgary.Our strongest start-ups also need capital to innovate and scale up.That’s why creative industries can now access our government’s $1.26-billion Strategic Innovation Fund.We want more Canadian creative entrepreneurs to be inspired by the international success of Cirque du Soleil, DHX or Robert Lepage—and to have the support to get there.Copyright Act – Focus on creatorsInvesting in creators also means ensuring they are fairly compensated and can protect and make the most of their intellectual property.We will soon launch a parliamentary review of the Copyright Act and I will work hard to ensure that review is focused on creators.Similarly, we will reform the Copyright Board to ensure that we support cultural content, pay our artists faster and reduce costs for all parties.Together, all of these initiatives will support creators as they turn great ideas into great content.Our message to them will be clear: take risks, put forward bold and unique material, and we will help you succeed.Pillar 2: Promote discovery and distribution at home and globallyOnce we’ve got great content, our next challenge is to make sure it finds its audience in Canada and around the world.There are three main parts to the challenge of distribution:How do we structure our own domestic market?How do we deal with foreign services that come into our domestic market?How do we make sure our domestic content reaches the international market?Domestic market: BroadcastingLet’s start with the question of the domestic market.The way we access content today is increasingly open, mobile and individual.Let me be clear: a strong domestic market is vital. It’s a launch pad for homegrown talent and a precondition for global success.It remains a core responsibility of all the players in the system to support our domestic market. That will not change.But our laws and regulations need to work in an online environment.That’s why, after nearly 30 years, it’s time to review the Broadcasting Act.We will announce more details of the review of the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act later this fall.Together, these two Acts will continue to form the backbone of our communications system.There is no question that the CRTC has a critical role to play in this transition.That’s why, today, Minister Bains and I have sent a letter to Ian Scott, the new Chair of the CRTC, to set out the issues we see as important for the regulator in fulfilling its mandate.That’s also why, today, we are invoking our power to request the CRTC to report back to the government on how they see the system evolving.We are asking them to look at how new models will support the creation and distribution of Canadian entertainment and information programming, in both official languages.We look forward to receiving the CRTC’s report to inform our legislative review.New Players, New PartnersOn the second question of foreign platforms in our market: What is their role? What obligations do they have to Canadians?Our goal is clear: as a government, we have a responsibility to continue to protect and promote our stories and our culture.We want to make sure these platforms work for Canadians and that they understand the importance of being a partner to support Canadian content.As many of these platforms become content producers themselves, it becomes even more important to ensure that there is a diversity of voices—Canadian voices—on their platforms.I’ve already started meeting with these companies to establish ties and bring them to the table.We want them to participate in our goals to support the creation and discovery of Canadian content that showcases our talent, our cultures and our stories.I’m pushing for commitments that benefit our industries.Today, I am announcing the first of these agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada and Netflix.Under this agreement, Netflix will create Netflix Canada – a permanent film and television production presence here in Canada, the first time that the company has done so outside the United States.And building on the strong track record of investing in Canadian producers and content with shows like Anneand Alias Grace with the CBC, Travellers with Showcase, and Frontier with Discovery, they have agreed to invest a minimum of $500 million in original productions in Canada, in both official languages, over the next five years.The Francophone market has great potential for growth, and Quebec has a unique and talented creative community. That is why Netflix is committed to investing $25 million in a market development strategy for French-language content and production—both within Quebec and in Francophone communities across Canada.Netflix will also work to promote Canadian films and programs on its platform so that they are discovered by Canadian audiences and millions of viewers around the world.These partnerships will allow our creators and producers to make top-shelf, high-quality content that competes with the best in the world.This is what is possible, this is what we expect, and this is the type of commitment we will work to achieve with other platforms, as well.So that our creators and industries remain strong, valued and, ultimately, Canadian.Export StrategyThirdly, how can we make sure our content gets to other markets?More than ever, creative entrepreneurs must look to global markets to be competitive, generate revenue and jobs, and grow.In our first budget, we hit the ground running, investing a one-time $35 million over two years to establish our cultural presence internationally and promote our creative industries abroad.One of the first things we did was put boots on the ground.We now have cultural trade experts working in missions around the world to help our industries reach key markets.We have invested in Canada’s presence in major trade fairs and events: the places where relationships are built and deals are made.This summer, Canada was the official partner country at Gamescom in Cologne, Germany.In 2020, we will be the country of honour at the Frankfurt Book Fair. It will have a major impact for our book industry and other creative sectors.This work must continue and grow.How will we do this?We will launch the first federal cultural trade mission in Canada’s history. We’ll support taking our best creators and companies to major foreign markets to make deals and build business-to-business relationships.We will expand and modernize our international co-production treaties to grow production budgets and attract new financing partners.And we will establish a Creative Industries Council, co-chaired with the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.To grow the sector, the different industries need to talk to one another. This group of experts drawn from across the creative industries will work on concrete strategies to open up new markets and coordinate Canada’s international presence and brand.Today, as part of our Creative Canada vision, we are announcing a new investment of $125 million over five years to support Canada’s first Creative Export Strategy. And we will work to enrich this investment as we continue to open up new markets and opportunities for Canada’s creative entrepreneurs.Cultural Diversity: Leadership on the World StageWe’ve been leading an international conversation on how we can ensure that a free and open Internet supports a diversity of voices and national content.I’ve said we believe the Internet is a progressive force, but all players—governments, Internet companies, civil society—have a role to play to give this meaning.It means that in a world of algorithms, there is a value—a public interest—in bursting the filter bubbles that exist.It’s why we want to see diverse Canadian content easily discoverable on all platforms available in Canada.We’ve been working at UNESCO, the G7, the World Economic Forum, and even in Silicon Valley itself to raise the importance of this issue.And we will work with our Canadian experts, including Waterloo’s Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), and with the Digital Global Policy Incubator at Stanford University, to organize an international forum to engage governments, civil society and global Internet companies in discussion of these issues.We will also work to safeguard the right of states to put in place measures to protect and promote their domestic industries to support the global diversity of cultural expressions.Let me be clear: culture is a priority in our NAFTA negotiations.And it’s why we are committed as a government to maintaining the flexibility for Canadian culture in NAFTA by exempting our cultural industries.Pillar 3: Strengthen public broadcasting and local newsSupporting Local NewsThere is no place to be more concerned about filter bubbles and the vital need for local information than in the news sector.During our consultations—and through the hard work of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage—I heard first-hand the importance of local news and information.In some communities, public broadcasting—on radio or over-the-air TV—is an essential source of local coverage.For others, it’s their local newspaper, which could be online like AllNovaScotia, an online source for local and business news in the Atlantic region.There are no easy solutions to the challenges facing this sector.We start from the premise that this is a shared responsibility between government at all levels, the private sector and civil society.Our approach will be guided by our belief that reliable journalistic content is critical to a healthy democracy. And that any action or measure by government must respect journalistic independence.Our approach will not be to bail out industry models that are no longer viable.Rather, we will focus our efforts on supporting innovation, experimentation and transition to digital.There is no one-size-fits-all approach.We have to foster experimentation and continue to take into account regional and linguistic differences.A few minutes ago, I talked about our expectations of platforms that create and share cultural content. We expect them to contribute to our goals.We expect Internet companies that aggregate and share news to do the same.We’ve asked Facebook to do more. Today, I’m pleased to announce that they will partner with Ryerson’s Digital Media Zone and the Ryerson School of Journalism to create a digital news incubator—the first of its kind in Canada.Participants will receive start-up funding and mentorship to accelerate innovative ideas that contribute to the digital development of journalism.This is a welcome first step; our intention is to foster many more.In our own program, the origins of the Canada Periodical Fund began before Confederation, as a postal subsidy to ensure Canadians across our vast country could have access to periodicals at an affordable price.Today, the Fund aims to ensure Canadians have access to diverse Canadian magazines and community newspapers. But eligibility is still built upon dwindling numbers of print subscribers.As more publications add mobile versions or move fully online, what’s important to Canadians is that they continue to publish original Canadian content.And that our programs provide the support they need to innovate, adapt and transition onto the platforms Canadians choose.A Vital Public BroadcasterIn this environment, the need for a strong, national public broadcaster has never been more clear.CBC/Radio-Canada broadcast its first newscast—a bilingual radio report—in 1936. For nearly 81 years, it has been a source of news stretching to the furthest communities of our country.In many parts of the country, it is an essential source of information, sometimes the only source.Never before has a public broadcaster been so needed, so vital, to so many.To tell the stories that must be heard—on television and radio, and through documentaries, films and programming for young audiences.To report on news that must be covered.To convene the conversations that must happen in a space built on the public’s trust and in public’s interest.The CBC carries a huge public responsibility. Canadians’ expectations for it are fiercely high. They ought to be.We’ve put $675 million of new funds into CBC/Radio-Canada, which it is using to support local content, the transition to digital, and to help bring on board the next generation of creative talent.We’ve also launched a new, open and independent process to select the next CBC leadership to ensure that Canadians are well-served by a team that reflects Canada’s incredible diversity and talent.This is an important moment for the CBC to look ahead and consider the critical role they have in providing a uniquely Canadian experience on a uniquely Canadian platform.As we review the Broadcasting Act, we will strengthen the mandate of our public broadcaster.We want the CBC to be a leading partner among Canada’s news and cultural organizations.And we want the CBC to play a leading role in showcasing Canadian cultural content—in both French and English, and reflecting the country’s diversity and Indigenous Peoples—at home and around the world.Where do we go from here?During the past 12 months, I’ve heard from thousands of Canadians, including many of you here in this room today.We all know that this is a very complex subject.No one is able to say with certainty what the new business model for creation, production and distribution of Canadian content will be in a digital world.This is a challenge and an opportunity. It generates anxiety and optimism.It is with humility and a deep sense of responsibility that I present to you today our government’s vision for a Creative Canada.While we deal with the transition, we will build our new system.This vision, and the strength of our creative industries, is our foundation and a roadmap for our sector.We are investing in our creative industries and creators, tackling the issues of distribution, and strengthening our media sector and public broadcaster.This morning, we published our policy framework for a Creative Canada.I invite you to read through it to digest more of the details.But our work isn’t done.In the year ahead, we will work with you, our partners, and across government to build on the direction I’ve outlined here.We will work with our Portfolio partners. Each of them will contribute to this vision.If we get this right, we will be a leader in the world.And, this will be our legacy.Generations from now, we want Canadians to have touchpoints that bring them together, that are markers of shared experience, of who we are.That is what culture does. And that’s why, now and in the future, culture matters more than ever.Let’s build this future together.Let’s build our Creative Canada.last_img read more

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National Arts Centre Orchestras Life Reflected honours four women

first_img Facebook Advertisement As a component of its True North Festival celebrating Canada’s 150 birthday, the CPO is hosting the National Arts Centre Orchestra in a single-night special concert entitled Life Reflected. The concert takes the form of a multimedia event that present portraits of four significant contemporary Canadian women: writer Alice Munro, anti-bullying advocate Amanda Todd, astronaut Roberta Bondar and the Indigenous poet Rita Joe.Each section of this work has been composed by a different Canadian composer, and each section is approached in a different way. Together they provide a composite picture of important Canadian women, each of whom has contributed significantly to how contemporary Canada understands itself at this juncture in its history.About the entire work, newly appointed conductor of the NAC, Alexander Shelley, commented: “What inspired me was looking at these four women who have found their voices, through difference sacrifices and challenges.” Shelley approached four prominent Canadian composers to be part of the project: Zosha Di Castri, John Estacio, Nicole Lizee and Jocelyn Morlock. They all have collaborated with Donna Feore to create a multimedia work that, in the words of the Ottawa Citizen: “transcends biography to embrace universal themes of pain, forgiveness, beauty and hope.” READ MORE Twitter The National Arts Centre Orchestra is touring a show called Life Reflected. It celebrates the stories of four Canadian women — author Alice Munro, teen Amanda Todd, astronaut Roberta Bondar, and Mi’kmaw poet and elder Rita Joe —through music, film, photography, graphic design, and the written word.The national tour comes to the Jack Singer Concert Hall in Calgary Oct. 26. Photo, Fred Cattroll, Canadian Press Fred Cattroll / Calgary Herald center_img Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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3 musicians weigh in on the Hedley allegations and Me Too in

first_imgLeah Fay Goldstein of July Talk, blues singer Shakura S’Aida, jazz and soul music vocalist Kellylee Evans. (Peter Dreimanis, Laura Carbone, Anne Staveley) Advertisement Allegations of sexual misconduct have hit the music industry, including allegations involving the band Hedley and its lead singer Jacob Hoggard.On today’s Q show we talk about how to move forward with facing and addressing allegations of predatory behaviour in the music industry with three Canadian artists: Leah Fay Goldstein of July Talk, blues singer Shakura S’Aida and jazz vocalist Kellylee Evans.CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Big Brother Canadas Rozina Yaqub laments being trapped in havenot hell

first_imgRozina entered the house energized with raw awe and excitement on night one, but Big Brother Canada stepped in with bad news when houseguest Andrew Miller was asked to choose seven players to suffer as have-nots in hell for the week. The spunky mom was swiftly selected. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Big Brother Canada’s Rozina Yaqub. Fourteen unassuming houseguests walked into the Big Brother Canada house expecting the unexpected but didn’t realize they would be entering a carefully curated version of heaven and hell for the next 70 days – if they last that long. The new season of the beloved reality series returned in dramatic fashion this week, merging heroes and villains-in-training who are all looking to secure their shot at the $100,000 grand prize.But while 49-year-old Rozina Yaqub’s dreams of winning the game were heaven sent, the Toronto-based religious educator watched her BBCAN experience go up in flames following the season’s first big twist and she became the first houseguest eliminated from the game following a unanimous vote of 11-0.“I didn’t want to be the first person voted out. I tried my best and if I was not in hell, I would still be in there,” Yaqub said the morning after her eviction.center_img Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

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Harper announces historic gathering with First Nations leaders amid outraged cries over

first_img(Prime Minister Stephen Harper meets with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo on Thursday. APTN/Photo)By Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–With cries of political outrage over the Attawapiskat crisis still echoing off Parliament Hill’s sandstone walls, Prime Minister Stephen Harper invited television cameras into his wood-panelled office before his meeting with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo Thursday to announce a “historic” gathering between his government and First Nations leaders.The prime minister, sitting on a leather armchair, said he was hoping the Jan. 24 meeting in Ottawa would offer a chance to discuss the many challenges and opportunities of First Nations people. Atleo sat next to him on a couch beneath a portrait of Canada’s first prime minister Sir John A. Macdonald.“I look forward to that, not only to look at the many challenges that confront First Nations, but also some of the opportunities that First Nations have and some of the opportunities that Canada has for First Nations people,” said Harper. “It is something I hope to be historic.”Atleo did not mention the word Attawapiskat, but responded by highlighting the government’s 2008 residential school apology and its decision to endorse the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Atleo said he hoped the government would seize the moment the meeting offered to create a new relationship with First Nations.“All of us inherited a very difficult task and discussions and conversations in recent days have highlighted that this is perhaps a moment that we grasp, that we seize this opportunity,” said Atleo. “That this government can grasp this moment to work with First Nations so we can begin to look forward to supporting the unleashing of the potential of our young people, the fastest growing segment of the Canadian population.”The gathering will feature meetings between a delegation of chiefs and government cabinet ministers and include discussions on a wide array of topics including education, treaties, land claims, self government and economic development.The gathering will open with a ceremony and speeches by the prime minister and First Nations leaders. The event will be broadcast live on the Internet.Chiefs not able to attend will also be able to participate from 10 regional video conferencing stations.The meeting has been months in the works, but the announcement came as the political fever pitch over the housing crisis in Attawapiskat was hitting a crescendo.Images of children and elders living in shacks with no insulation, tents and packed into a trailer donated by a mining company have been flickering on television screens across the country.The story of Attawapiskat, a Cree community on the shores of James Bay in northern Ontario where people live without running water and use the bathroom in buckets, has sparked a national debate over the state of First Nations communities in the country.Some of Attawapiskat’s residents in the most dire housing situations are expected to be moved into the community’s arena and healing centre for temporary accommodation as deep winter like temperatures grip the community.A little over two hours before Harper and Atleo’s meeting, the NDP and Liberals opened their question period assault on the government with Attawapiskat.The prime minister and Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan stuck to their defence that the dire housing conditions in the community were the result of faulty band management.Attawapiskat has been put under third-party management, meaning a consultant is now in charge of administering the band’s finances.“The prime minister’s response to the crisis in Attawapiskat is unbelievable. What the people there need is heating, housing and running water, but instead the prime minister is sending accountants and auditors,” said NDP interim leader Nycole Turmel. “Does the prime minister realize that with this third-party management the message he is sending (is that) if you need help, shut your mouth or you’ll be punished?”Harper responded by repeating his government’s line of defence, that the community had received $90 million since 2006 and that the housing situation was the result of faulty administration.“The government is responding actively and immediately to the needs of these communities,” said Harper. “Not just now, but over the past five years the government has invested $90 million to the community of Attawapiskat. Obviously a large part of our responsibility is to ensure these funds fully benefit the people in these communities.”Attawapiskat’s band council issued a statement saying the community had received $94 million over six years and it amounted to under $10,000 for each of its 1,800 residents every year.The band says only about $6 million had been spent on housing over the past six years.The rest of the money has been spent on services like education and child care, the band said.“My people deserve dignity, humane living conditions, for that our community asked for the assistance from my fellow citizens,” said Chief Theresa Spence in a statement. “For our simple request for human dignity, the government’s decision was to impose a colonial Indian agent.”On Wednesday, an Aboriginal Affairs official interrupted a meeting of the community’s emergency team and handed Spence a letter indicating she was no longer in charge of the band’s administrationSome Attawapiskat residents, however, told APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin that they were glad with the change.One resident said they were concerned about what was happening to money that came from the impact benefit agreement Attawapiskat had with De Beers, which runs a diamond mine 90 kilometres from the community.“I’m concerned about where the money is,” said Greg Shisheesh. “This past October it was $13.5 million. I just found out the other day there’s only $8 million in the trust fund and I want to know where the rest of the money is, $5.5 million.”jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

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