Diamond, Uitvlugt, Sheet Anchor Water Treatment Plants for November completion

first_imgHundreds of residents residing in Sheet Anchor, East Coast Berbice, Diamond, East Bank Demerara and Uitvlugt, West Coast Demerara will benefit from improved access to potable water supply, with the completion of three new water treatment plants by November this year.Managing Director of The Guyana Water Inc (GWI), Dr Richard Van West-Charles told the Department of Public Information (DPI) that major works have advanced the projects which are on schedule for a November 2019 completion date.The new water treatment plant being constructed at Uitvlugt will serve residents from Cornelia Ida to De Kinderen, supplying 10 million litres of treated water per day once completed.Diamond’s new water treatment plant will service some 23,266 people fromConstruction of sedimentation tank at UitvlugtHerstelling to Great Diamond with 12 million litres of treated water per day.The water treatment plants are components of a larger project for which a more than $6 billion (US$31.6 million) loan was signed in 2014 by the Government of Guyana and the IDB for a Water Supply and Sanitation Infrastructure Improvement Programme.The four components of the overall project are the construction of new water treatment plants at Sheet Anchor, Diamond and Uitvlugt and rehabilitation and expansion of the Shelter Belt water treatment plant; reducing non-revenue water loss through metering and establishment of district meter zones in the programme areas; institutional strengthening of GWI and conversion of existing pit latrines to septic tanks for 1,000 beneficiaries.last_img read more

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McIlroy eyes Masters at Pebble Beach Pro-Am

first_img0Shares0000Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland plays a shot during the Dubai Desert Classic at Emirates Golf Club on January 28, 2018 © AFP/File / GIUSEPPE CACACESAN FRANCISCO, United States, Feb 8 – Former world number one Rory McIlroy is hoping to build on recent near-misses in Abu Dhabi and Dubai as he steps up his Masters preparation on Thursday at the PGA Tour’s Pebble Beach Pro-Am.The Northern Irish star has enjoyed a solid start to the year, finishing in a tie for third at the Abu Dhabi Championship last month before a second place at the Dubai Desert Classic. McIlroy, who returned to the top 10 last month after failing to win an event last year for the first time in nearly a decade, said he had taken positives from recent results.His runner-up spot in Dubai came after he blew a two-shot lead down the stretch to give China’s Li Haotong the biggest win of his career.However McIlroy said simply being in position to win had been encouraging.“I had two chances to win golf tournaments and I didn’t,” McIlroy said of his performances in Abu Dhabi and Dubai.“But great building blocks. I don’t want to dwell on them too much — I take them for what they are, which are good performances in a couple of pretty solid golf tournaments.“They were two good confidence builders going into this part of the season,” the four-time Major winner added.“I feel like the best way to prepare you for a big week like the Masters is to be in contention, feeling those nerves down the stretch. I feel like the more I play, the more chance I’m going to give myself to be in that position,” added McIlroy, who is playing this week’s tournament in California for the first time.Another former world number one, Australia’s Jason Day, is also satisfied with his form ahead of Pebble Beach.Day returned to the top 10 in the world rankings last month after defeating Alex Noren in a play-off at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines. It was the Australian’s first title since the 2016 Players Championship.Day told reporters Wednesday he was eager to add to his career tally of 11 PGA Tour wins and one major.“Every mindset that I take into every tournament should be like, ‘This could be my last tournament,’” Day said.“Because I don’t know what’s happening around the corner. My back could be gone, and I may not be able to pick up a golf club again.“I need to go and try and win every single event, because who knows what’s going to happen around the corner.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Chelsea target plays down talk of Roma exit: ‘I know nothing’

first_img1 Antonio Rudiger only joined Italian giants Roma last week Roma defender Antonio Rudiger has palmed off questions over his future – amid talk of a £20m bid from Chelsea.New Blues boss Antonio Conte is a huge admirer of the centre-back, 23, and he will put him high on his list of transfer targets when he takes charge at Stamford Bridge after Italy’s Euro 2016 campaign.Rudiger is currently on international duty with Germany and insists his focus is solely on Euro 2016 rather than where he will be playing next season. “I know nothing about my future right now,” he told Sportitalia.“At the moment I am only focusing on the European Championship with Germany.”last_img read more

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Why are gas prices so high? Federal rules helped

first_imgQ: What about the growing demand for oil? A: The growing economies of India and China are causing a global increase in demand for oil. Also the United States, which consumes one-quarter of the world’s oil, has shown little sign of easing demand despite high prices. With the world consuming 85 million barrels of oil a day, analysts say there is only about 1.5 million barrels a day of spare production capacity – almost all in Saudi Arabia. “It’s sort of Economics 101,” says Al Hubbard, the president’s economic adviser. “The demand for fuel and gasoline has been … growing dramatically and the supply has not been growing as rapidly.” Q: What can President Bush and Congress do? A: Very little in the short term. Bush has said the country needs to move away from its addiction to oil. But developing alternatives such as hydrogen fuel cells for transport is decades away. Hybrid gas-electric cars still represent only a small fraction of car sales and supplies of corn-based ethanol – a substitute for gasoline – is limited. The cost-effective development of cellulostic ethanol is still under research. Q: Should federal and state taxes on gasoline be reduced or temporarily repealed to ease the cost to consumers? A: Democrats on Tuesday called for a 60-day “holiday” from the 18.4-cent federal gasoline tax, saying it would provide $100 million a day in immediate relief from high gasoline costs. It also would increase the federal deficit by $6 billion, unless the lost revenue – as suggested by Democrats – is made up by imposing new taxes on oil companies. The White House has shown little interest in such a move. Q: Bush on Tuesday directed the EPA to temporarily waive environmental rules if necessary to ease fuel shortages and dampen prices, and suspended shipments of oil into the government’s emergency reserve. Will that have any impact on prices? A: The EPA action is expected to have marginal impact, although it could make available more imported gasoline that doesn’t meet the U.S. clean-air standards. But most of the summer-blend, cleaner gasoline already is in place. Still, the wholesale price of gasoline for delivery in May dropped slightly after Bush’s remarks. The amount of crude going into the federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve is so small the suspension of shipments will have no impact, analysts believe. Q: Congress enacted broad energy legislation last year. Why hasn’t it had an impact? A: Most of the measures in that law are aimed at the long term. In fact, some provisions have added to the recent jump in gas prices. It required the use of more ethanol, which made gas more expensive to produce, and it timed the lifting of an oxygenate requirement in gasoline to May 5, prompting refiners to stop using MTBE as an additive, just as they also were shifting to summer-blend fuel. The move away from MTBE, which has been found to contaminate water supplies, to ethanol as a substitute has added anywhere from 3 cents to 8 cents a gallon to prices at the pump. Q: The country’s three largest oil companies are expected to report $16 billion in profits in the first quarter of this year. Exxon Mobil Corp. earned $36 billion last year, the highest ever by a U.S. company. Should oil industry profits be reined in? A: Some Democrats in Congress have called for taxing profits on oil sold at more than $40 a barrel, but have been unable to get enough support to get it passed. Bush said Tuesday that he is opposed to such a tax. Oil executives have told Congress a windfall tax would inhibit oil development. Q: Is there price gouging? A: At congressional hearings both Republicans and Democrats have said they believe there is gouging, but it’s hard to prove. There is no federal anti-gouging law and only about half the states have price-gouging statutes, some of them extremely weak. Legislation to give the FTC authority to investigate price gouging has failed to pass Congress. The head of the Federal Trade Commission has said she opposes such a law, preferring to leave it to states. Bush on Tuesday called on the FTC and Justice Department to aggressive enforce federal antitrust laws on oil companies and help states pursue price-gouging cases. But the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., says the federal antitrust laws are not adequate to deal with the oil industry and need to be strengthened.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventHowever, gasoline still costs less in the United States than in many European countries. And taking general inflation into account, it is slightly cheaper than what motorists paid in March 1981 in the aftermath of the Iran hostage crisis. Q: Why have prices been going up lately? A: Mainly because crude-oil costs have soared, briefly reaching $75 a barrel, one-third higher than a year ago. More than half of every $1 motorists pay for gas goes to the cost of crude. Gasoline supplies also have been tight because refiners shifted additives under government orders, using more ethanol. Ethanol prices have jumped 77 cents a gallon, to $2.77, since December because of increased demand. And refiners are reaping record profits despite the high cost of crude. Q: What’s behind the jump in crude oil prices? A: Mainly market jitters about a potential cutoff of oil from Iran over a nuclear standoff and political tensions in the Middle East as well as in Nigeria and Venezuela, both major oil producers. The absence of substantial oil exports from Iraq has added to tight global supplies. WASHINGTON – The $3 gas sign has become a common sight as the cost of fuel has soared in recent weeks. Why are prices so high? And can President George W. Bush or Congress do anything about it? Some answers to questions many motorists are asking. Q: How bad is the recent price increase? A: Last week, prices for regular grade averaged $2.94 a gallon nationwide, a 23-cent increase in two weeks and 68 cents higher than a year ago. And prices in many areas, such as the West Coast and Mid-Atlantic states, are exceeding $3 a gallon. last_img read more

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MURDER TRIAL: ‘MY COUSIN TOLD ME HE KILLED DONEGAL MAN’

first_imgA COUSIN of a man accused of murdering a Co Donegal labourer has told a court that he admitted he’d carried out the killing.Adel Ishaq and Asif Rehman deny killing Malin Head man William McKeeney, who died after the being attacked in a street in Glasgow’s Pollokshields area in January this year.Omar Bhatti, a cousin of Ishaq said he admitted to him that he had been involved in the attack and that they had then gone to a Glasgow lane and burnt his clothes. The court also heard that Rehman’s former partner, Charlene Milloy, asked him to swear on the grave of their late son that he wasn’t involved.She said that three days after the killing of Mr McKeeney she asked the two accused if they were involved with the death.She held up a newspaper containing an article with details of the killing and said to them: “What is the script with this?”She said, however, that her former partner was high on drugs and that she couldn’t make any sense out of him.She asked Rehman to swear on their late son Adam’s grave that he had no involvement with the killing. He shrugged in response.Ishaq also shrugged and said: “I didnae mean it.”It emerged in court also that Milloy had received a call in the hours after the attack.Asked if Rehman had commented on the incident, she said: “No, we were discussing problems in our relationship during the entirety of the two hour, 21 minute call.”The trial continues.The prosecution claim the murder was racially motivated.MURDER TRIAL: ‘MY COUSIN TOLD ME HE KILLED DONEGAL MAN’ was last modified: October 10th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:InishowenMalin Headmurder victomwilliam mckeeneylast_img read more

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GAA: NEW BOUNDARY WARS THREATEN TO TEAR DONEGAL APART

first_imgBOUNDARY disputes between GAA clubs in the county are threatening to turn into a tsunami of claims and counter claims, donegaldaily.com can reveal.The latest dispute will come before the County Committee at its meeting next February.At last night’s committee meeting at Jackson’s Hotel in Ballybofey, there was confirmation that Burt GAA club has asked the county board to confirm the club has sole access to players in the Burt, Fahan and Inch parishes. This will provoke a response from Buncrana GAA club – some of their members come from Fahan and Inch.County Board chairman PJ McGowan confirmed last night that Burt has asked for ratification of the boundaries at the first committee meeting in 2012. That meeting will take place in February.Last night’s meeting also heard about the ongoing dispute between Naomh Mhuire in Annagry and Dungloe.County chairman PJ McGowan proposed the dispute should go to a sub-committee meeting chaired by someone independent from outside the county. However both clubs agreed that the dispute should be chaired by Mr McGowan and he accepted the offer. Naomh Mhuire representative Cormac McGarvey said that the clubs had been trying to sort out the boundary dispute for 31 years.“That’s longer than Osama bin Laden was hiding out. He was only hiding out for ten years, this has been going on for 31 years,” he said.However Dungloe’s Enda Bonner cited the Good Friday Agreement as the model for solving the dispute.“All our club is looking for is the human rights to play for our club since it was formed,” said Mr Bonner.He went on: “If I went to Glenties, bought a field and set up a GAA club, would that mean we could have sole access to all the players in that town.” He added: “Geography is not the issue, history is the issue.”Donegaldaily.com understands that other boundary disputes are almost certain to come up.One club delegate told us: “Where will this stop? Will people in Kerrykeel be forced to play in the Milford parish instead of with Fanad Gaels? It could end up tearing the county apart.”DONEGALDAILY.COM – FIRST AGAIN WITH ALL THE BIG STORIES IN DONEGAL © 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedFollow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailySell anything on www.donegaldailyclassifieds.comGAA: NEW BOUNDARY WARS THREATEN TO TEAR DONEGAL APART was last modified: November 8th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:boundary disputesDonegal GAAdunglast_img read more

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Regional electricity from REDs

first_img5 July 2005South Africa’s first regional electricity distributor, known as RED One, was signed into operation at a ceremony in Cape Town on Monday.The establishment of REDs wills help the government improve delivery of electricity, Minerals and Energy Minister Lindiwe Hendricks said at the ceremony.She said the restructuring of the electricity distribution industry was aimed at improving governance of the sector and stimulating economic development.“We want to improve access and the service delivery of electricity. We believe we will achieve this by consolidating the electricity industry.”REDs will be made up of power utility Eskom and local authorities, which will buy electricity from power generators at wholesale prices determined by the National Energy Regulator.The launch of RED One is expected to pave the way for five other REDs, which will combine the distribution function of Eskom with that of 187 municipalities already distributing electricity in the country.An operating agreement signed between RED One and Eskom commits both to continued good service delivery.Hendricks said work was being done on the Electricity Regulation Bill to address limitations placed by current legislation on electricity distribution industry reform.The legislation will be tabled in Parliament by the end of August.“We will soon thereafter embark on a process to fast-track the electricity distribution restructuring legislation to ensure that work becomes easier and faster,” she said.Cape Town is the first municipality in the country where a RED has been established.The mayor of the city, Nomaindia Mfeketo, said RED One would maintain “relative price stability and reasonable tariff increases.“We will strive as a matter of principle to ensure affordability, equity, sustainability and cost recovery in the price of electricity,” she said.The mayor also announced that councillor Saleem Mowzer had resigned to become chief executive officer of RED One.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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One step closer to HIV vaccine

first_imgAlthough South Africa has the most HIV-positive people of any country, efforts in prevention and treatment are bearing fruit. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morefree images, visit the image library) Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom emphasised the importance of research that will yield results in the long, rather than short term. Prof Lynn Morris (left), heads of Aids research at the NCID, and Dr Penny Moore, who led the research project.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Judith Annakie-Eriksen  Communications officer, Caprisa  +27 31 260 4096 or +27 82 782 1276 RELATED ARTICLES • Taking HIV testing to the masses • Software speeds HIV diagnosis • New centres to help fight HIV in KZN • HIV testing drive for SA students • SA team leads study on anti-HIV gelJanine ErasmusThe South African medical and scientific community is abuzz with the news that local researchers have documented one method of the production in the body of broadly neutralising antibodies (BNAbs) against HIV – a discovery that could lead to the future development of a vaccine.Researchers from the Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (Caprisa), together with the ministers of health and science and technology, made the announcement at a media briefing in Johannesburg. Also in attendance were the US embassy’s Chargé d’Affaires, Virginia Palmer; Nancy Knight, country director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and Caprisa’s Prof Carolyn Williamson, a respected virologist.Caprisa was founded in 2001 as a partnership between the universities of KwaZulu-Natal, Cape Town and the Western Cape, as well as New York’s Columbia University and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) in Johannesburg.Its main function is to carry out research of local and global relevance, and to advance the world’s understanding of the HI virus, as well as the tuberculosis connection.“There is a range of different Aids prevention technologies,” said epidemiologist Prof Salim Abdool Karim, opening the proceedings, “and one of them is the development of an Aids vaccine.“The work carried out by Caprisa and other institutions is crucial to our understanding of how the virus evolves in individuals, how the body responds, and how the virus mutates to escape the body’s onslaught,” he said. “This enigma, the variability of the virus, is the big challenge.”The five-year study was led by virologist Dr Penny Moore, and funded partly by the Department of Science and Technology, the CDC, the Wellcome Trust, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Technology Innovation Agency, among others.The results were published in a paper co-authored by 20 scientists – of whom 16 were South African – and released on 21 October in the online version of Nature Medicine journal under the title Evolution of an HIV glycan–dependent broadly neutralizing antibody epitope through immune escape.Joking that South Africans can see that their tax money is being well spent, Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi praised the research team for the discovery, saying that it is a testimony to the world-class quality of South African scientists.Science and technology minister Derek Hanekom also lauded the team. “This is an energetic group of emerging young scientists,” he said, “who are not all male and not all white. This is the new generation that is finding answers to the serious challenges confronting not just South Africa, but the world.”He said it was significant that the research team is led by women. “One in five adult women in South Africa is HIV-positive. We need an arsenal of measures to fight the disease, but the prospects of winning the war without a vaccine are simply not good.”Hanekom stressed the importance of research such as this, that doesn’t necessarily yield short-term results, adding that any investment will pay off, and that the knowledge in itself is just as valuable as the results.Remarkable discovery“There are two types of HIV antibodies,” explained Moore, a senior scientist from the Centre for HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infections at the NICD, “one which is strain-specific, and the other that is broadly neutralising.”The difference between these two types is that the former only recognises the virus that is present in the body which has produced it, while the latter type, which was itself only discovered about three years ago, is able to recognise and work against many different strains.“Broadly neutralising antibodies are obviously more useful to us, but they are also much rarer, only appearing in one out of five individuals. Luckily we can learn much from these rare people.”The remarkable discovery centres around two HIV-positive women from KwaZulu-Natal, both of whom were participants in separate Caprisa programmes – the Acute Infection Study, and the widely publicised Tenofovir Gel Microbicide Trial.Both women spontaneously started to produce BNAbs some years ago, although at the time it was not known how or why. Moore’s research focused on discovering the mechanism through which these valuable substances are produced.By tracing the women’s clinical history and studying the evolution of the virus and the antibodies’ target site, Moore and her team found that its mutation is the trigger for the production of broadly neutralising antibodies.The key is the protective coating, or envelope, that the virus surrounds itself with in order to escape the action of antibodies. The target site in question is a sugar or glycan, located at a specific area on the protein envelope. This is an area of vulnerability to which an antibody can attach.But the glycan, known as sugar 332, is not always present at the start of infection, as the team discovered.“Because the virus is attacked right from the start by less powerful antibodies,” explained Moore, “it is forced to mutate in order to stay one step ahead of the body’s response. Over time it coats itself with this sugar, which becomes its Achilles heel.”Tests conducted with 200 different HIV strains from around the world – half of them from Africa – have shown that the rare BNAbs are effective against 88% of them.“This sugar is present in many viruses,” said Moore, “and because of it we now know one pathway to the development of broadly neutralising antibodies.”Cat and mouse gameThe HI virus is one of those that are able to mutate rapidly to avoid deactivation by antibodies produced by the immune system.“It mutates perhaps faster than any other virus,” said Moore. “A vaccine works on more stable viruses, and this is the reason that we don’t yet have an HIV vaccine.”The thinking amongst researchers these days is not how to produce a vaccine, she said, but rather what can be learned from HIV-positive people that will help scientists to make a vaccine. Moore pointed out that the new finding is not a vaccine, but opens up a new path towards the development of one.“This discovery is not about a cure,” said Abdool Karim, “but rather about prevention of infection.”Heroines rememberedThe two women came in faithfully once a month for many years, said Moore, to donate blood for research purposes. One of them is doing very well, with no detectable viral load at the moment, but the other has died from complications caused by tuberculosis which evolved into first the multidrug-resistant and then the extremely drug-resistant strain.“However, she has left a legacy that will go far beyond her own life,” said Abdool Karim.Motsoaledi agreed, saying that the subjects of the study deserved as much praise as the research team.“Without them even the best idea can’t be tested. We owe our thanks to the two women, who are also scientists in a way, because through them we have found this breakthrough.”Unfortunately the women’s health didn’t improve as a result of the formation of BNAbs, because the virus had already established itself over many years of infection and the damage was done.“For a vaccine to be effective,” said Moore, “it has to get into the body before the virus.”The way a vaccine would potentially work, she said, would be as a sequential type of immunisation where the envelope protein without the sugar would be administered first – this would trigger the production of normal HIV antibodies. Later the protein with the sugar would be used to trick the body into replicating the natural situation and producing BNAbs.Making progress in the fightSouth Africa has made progress in recent years in the war against the Aids epidemic. Although the country has the highest number of HIV-positive people in the world, there are 1.7-million people on antiretroviral treatment, and this strategy is slowly yielding results.“In 2008 the rate of mother-to-child transmission was 8%,” said Motsoaledi. “We have brought it down to 3% in 2010 and 2.7% in 2011, and we are confident that we’ll bring it to a negligible level, below 0.1%, by 2015.”Other achievements include the tenofovir microbicidal gel trial, initiated by Caprisa in KwaZulu-Natal, and the decrease in the mortality rate of children under five, he said.But the development of a vaccine is still years in the making, and until then Motsoaledi urged all South Africans to continue to take precautions and live a responsible lifestyle.“HIV is a problem of all South Africans as well as the world in general. We need to take responsibility for our own lives.”last_img read more

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Kallis commits to 2015 World Cup

first_img‘Maturity’“At the moment we have a youthful ODI batting line-up, and Jacques brings a maturity that will be invaluable in developing the new generation,” Domingo said. Cricket South Africa (CSA) CEO Haroon Lorgat commented: “Jacques is an extraordinary player who appreciates the ODI team building process that is currently under way. His availability is welcomed and CSA will do everything possible to help him achieve his personal ambitions while building a new generation ODI team.” “It remains my aspiration to be available for the 2015 edition of the ICC Cricket World Cup but, at the same time, I know as an all-rounder approaching my 38th birthday, I will need to assess my future in the game season by season. “Playing for my country has always been both a huge honour and a privilege,” Kallis said in a statement on Tuesday. South Africa currently occupies fifth place in the International Cricket Council’s ODI rankings, which, given 2013’s poor run is a little surprising. However, the addition of the proven quality and experience of Kallis should help the team produce better results. Cricketing great Jacques Kallis has repeated his intention to extend his one-day international career and be part of the South African team at the 2015 ICC World Cup in Australasia. In terms of the sheer weight of numbers, his career as an all-rounder in ODI and test cricket is unmatched in the history of cricket. ‘Mentally and physically refreshed’ South Africa has played the majority of the team’s matches without four world-class players. Without them, it is unreasonable to expect the Proteas to challenge for the number one ranking in ODIs. “The plan is to bring him back into the ODI squad for the home series against India in November.center_img 2013 recordThe Proteas’ record in 2013 has been poor: seven wins, 10 defeats and a tie. The key statistic in that time is this: Dale Steyn seven matches, Graeme Smith seven matches, Morne Morkel eight matches, and Jacques Kallis zero matches. 21 August 2013 Proteas head coach Russell Domingo weighed in, saying: “We are scheduled to play 30 ODIs between now and the start of the World Cup and we cannot expect Jacques to play every match. If we were to do that we would limit his longevity and we don’t want that. In that time, Kallis has played only four matches, with the last of those being on 29 February 2012. They won all four of them. Since January 2012, the Proteas – the number one team in test cricket – have been nothing more than average in the 50 overs a side format. They have played 31 matches, won 15, lost 14 and tied one. Career statisticsIn 321 one-day internationals, he has tallied 11 498 runs at an excellent average of 45.26 runs. As a bowler, he has captured 270 wickets at 31.69, with an economy rate of 4.82 run per over. He has also taken 125 catches. “At the moment, I am feeling mentally and physically refreshed and I am looking forward to carry on playing for my country as long as possible.” SAinfo and Cricket South Africalast_img read more

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