Professor researches violence

first_imgWhile working in Northern Ireland over the past six years, Dr. Mark Cummings’ research team found that political violence affects the way families function, which in turn causes behavioral and mental health problems in children. The team’s research was published on “Child Development’s” website and will run in a future issue of the journal, according to a Feb. 8 University press release. Cummings, chair of the psychology department, said he first became interested in the conflict in Northern Ireland while he was a Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies fellow. “I became interested in exploring the impact of political violence on families and children as a way to better understand possibility for peace process,” he said. “If you understand those pathways, then you understand more about how you might remediate problems by first understanding what the problems are at that level.” In conducting the research, Cummings and his team worked with faculty living in Northern Ireland. The researchers from Northern Ireland conducted all the interviews, he said. “When we started, the children were between 10 and 15,” he said. “Now we are on our sixth year studying approximately 1,000 families in Belfast.” Mothers and children were interviewed and filled out a survey to assess the different measures of political violence they encountered, Cummings said. “We developed measures of sectarian community violence and non-sectarian community violence,” he said. “We assessed interparental conflict, family conflict and parenting, especially parents control over children’s behavior.” Cummings said the researchers were also examining the emotional security of their participants, as well as the children’s adjustments. Through interviews and surveys, the research team found that political violence, specifically that of Northern Ireland’s political and religious divisions, affects family units, which in turn affects children. “This violence increases conflict between parents, increases family conflict, and that increases insecurity that children have about their communities and their families,” he said. “And that leads directly to them having problems with depression, aggression, anxiety.” The team has also found that social identity matters in this conflict. “We’ve found that kids identity as Catholic or Protestant also factors in,” he said. The identification as Catholic or Protestant can be both an indicator of youth resilience and risk, he said. Cummings said that, while he and his team have only studied one area, their results could be generalized to a certain extent. “We do think that every society would be different, but different levels of society effect children,” he said. “Children’s emotional security about their community, their culture and their family’s matter to their adjustment.” Cummings said this research would also help understand youth and how political violence affects them everywhere, not just in Northern Ireland.last_img read more

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Panel unpacks the 2018 midterm elections

first_imgThe Center for Social Concerns’ ND Votes kicked off its first “Pizza, Pop and Politics” event of the semester Wednesday night in the Geddes Coffee House. The panel discussion, titled “Unpacking the 2018 Midterm Elections Results: What We Know and What it May Mean” featured political science professors Darren Davis, Christina Wolbrecht and David Campbell presenting different aspects of the elections.Davis spoke about the presence of racial resentment in the recent midterm elections.“White Americans are angry and anxious, and this was evident and exploited in the 2018 midterm elections,” Davis said. Noah Cha Political science professor Darren Davis discusses racial resentment in the U.S. 2018 midterm elections.He said that explicit racial prejudice cannot fully explain this phenomenon; instead, he said, it is racial resentment, the idea that African Americans and minorities make illegitimate demands on the political system.“This deep fear and anxiety, this racial resentment, comes from the thought that the white way of life and status quo is changing,” he said.Davis said racial resentment is a “system justifying belief” in which the individuals who benefit most from the status quo are more sensitive to threats to the system and are most likely to defend it.Racial resentment was present in specific elections during the midterm, Davis said. There was an overt appeal to race and ethnicity in races such as the Florida and Georgia governor races, as well as in ads from Trump himself.“I have never seen a current president air advertisements during the midterm elections until Trump,” he said. “Trump’s controversial migrant caravan ad was trying to activate that sense of fear.”Most important, Davis said, “racial resentment and system justifying beliefs are alive and functioning in politics today from the president down in stoking anxiety.”Wolbrecht spoke on the impact of women candidates and women voters in the midterms.She said there was a major spike in women running for Congress and winning seats. Most of this nomination jump came from female Democrats, who have had more female nominees than the Republican Party for the past 30 years, Wolbrecht said.“The only thing slowing women is men already sitting in the seats,” she said. “Almost 200 women ran and much fewer were elected, that is just the reality of incumbency in the U.S.”Wolbrecht showed recent headlines and magazine covers attesting that many women were running because they were inspired by Trump, wanting vengeance against his actions.“In reality,” Wolbrecht said, “most women said, ‘no, it’s not about Trump.’ Many ran because they cared about their local community, health care or other policy concerns.”In regards to the female voter, Wolbrecht emphasized the diversity of this demographic.“There is no female voter,” she said. “Women are as diverse as, hold onto your seats, men.” However, she said the biggest difference this election was that women, especially women under 40 and those who are college-educated, were more likely to vote for the Democratic party.Campbell spoke about turnout in the 2018 midterm elections. The 2018 midterm elections had the highest turnout in a century, and the increase was thanks to “a whole bundle of things,” he said.“When it’s not just a boring public service announcement, but young people like yourselves encouraging other people to vote, that is when there is success,” Campbell said.However, he said this turnout spike needs to be put in context. The 2018 turnout almost reached 50 percent, and these numbers are not unprecedented — this number looks even worse on a 0-100 percent scale.“Historically, it is not as high as it could be,” he said. “America’s exceptional, I guess you could say.”His joke was in reference to a chart of voter turnout among other democratic, developed nations where the U.S. ranked nearly dead last, having only stronger turnout than Switzerland.The 2018 midterms were expected to have high turnout and they did have a spike — the 18 to 29 age group clocked in at a high of about 31 percent.“Kids are turning out but they are still slackers compared to their parents and grandparents,” Campbell said.Back in the 1990s, the 18 to 29 age group voted very evenly between the two major parties, he said. Since then, young people have grown increasingly Democratic, with a major Democratic increase happening in the 2018 elections.“I am troubled by this increasing party split among young people,” Campbell said. “I am troubled that we have parties that are divided by so many social divisions, and adding age to that mix will exacerbate party polarization.”Campbell encouraged Notre Dame Republicans to remain active in their party — he said the current divide is not healthy and he hopes the Republican party can move away from the fringes and back to the center right.Tags: 2018 midterm elections, 2018 midterms, Pizza Pop and Politicslast_img read more

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Bamboo Muhly Grass

first_imgWhile walking around the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia, I was caught up in the beauty of grass that was so picturesque when it was backlit by the sun. It was a muhly grass, but not the pink, cotton-candy-looking kind admired in the fall. This was bamboo muhly native to Arizona. Plants native to Arizona aren’t often considered as adaptable to the hot, humid Southeast, but bamboo muhly is like having a piece of fine art in the garden.Botanically speaking, the grass is Muhlenbergia dumosa, and several references claim it is native to parts of New Mexico and California. I can’t confirm that via the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The garden has several of these 6-foot-tall, finely textured plants that really do look like bamboo. Years ago, I remember ‘Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass being called a perpetual motion plant in the prevailing breezes, but it pales in comparison to bamboo muhly.You may be thinking that anything called “bamboo” is to be feared, but not this incredible, clump-forming grass. If the only grass you grow is the one you mow, you are missing out. This is a grass grown strictly for the wispy fine or thread-like element it provides the landscape as its bloom are inconspicuous, to say the least.Bamboo muhly is cold hardy from zones 7 through 10 and will perform in full to partial sun. If you think about a plant native to Arizona, you know the critical factor — it must have good drainage. On the plus side, this means you provide enough water to get it established, then you have a tough-as-nails landscape element.Here at the garden, we use some bamboo muhly in partnership with large, fan-leafed palms. This is the ultimate in contrasting foliage, as the bold- or coarse-textured tropical palm and the fine-textured grass move in the breeze. In another area, we partnered the grass with dwarf oleander, and with ‘Soft Caress’ mahonia in another area. All of these combinations stand out because of their differing leaf colors and shapes.My favorite partnership in the garden is the one near the small, tight-clumping ‘Chinese Goddess’ bamboo, known botanically as Bambusa multiplex ‘Riviereorum.’ This bamboo came to the garden via Floyd McClure in 1928. There is something about these two clump-forming plants that mesmerizes me. After all, they are both grasses, if you know what I mean.To grow bamboo muhly, choose a site in full sun with fertile, well-drained soil. Amend tight-compacted clay as needed with 3 to 4 inches of organic matter, like compost or humus. Till to a depth of 8 to 10 inches and incorporate 2 pounds of a slow-release, 12-6-6 fertilizer per 100 square feet of bed area.Dig the planting hole two to three times as wide as the root ball, but no deeper. Plant the muhly grass at the same depth it is growing in the container, with the crown slightly above the soil profile. Know that your plant will reach 4 to 6 feet tall and grow as wide, so allow enough space to let your plant show off.In Savannah, we don’t cut ours back unless the cane or stem actually dies. In colder areas, treat it like you do pink muhly or Lindheimer’s muhly. Cut the foliage back hard to about 12 inches in late winter. Apply a light application of fertilizer when pruning and again in midsummer. A little supplemental water during prolonged dry periods in the summer will pay dividends. Clumps can be divided in early spring.For more information about the garden, go to coastalgeorgiabg.org.last_img read more

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Panel of professional athletes to discuss issues of sustainability in sport April 7

first_imgOn Tuesday, April 7, at 6:30 p.m., a panel of sports professionals and environmental advocates will participate in a discussion at Middlebury College titled Jocks and Treehuggers: Pro Athletes on Sustainability. The event is free and open to the public and will take place in Room 216 of McCardell Bicentennial Hall, located on Bicentennial Way off College Street (Route 125).Middlebury College Scholar-in-Residence in Environmental Affairs Bill McKibben will deliver the introductory remarks and Middlebury College Athletic Sustainability Coordinator Andrew Gardner will moderate the discussion. Panelists include National Football League professional Dhani Jones, professional soccer player Natalie Spilger and Sports Illustrated Senior Writer Alexander Wolf.Jones, a player with the Cincinnati Bengals, rides a bike to the stadium for practices and games, works with Al Gore s climate change initiative, and promotes the World Food Program, which fights hunger worldwide. He also stars in the Travel Channel s new original series, Dhani Tackles the Globe. By actively participating in some of the most beloved national pastimes from around the world, Jones discovers that sports have the universal ability to open a window into a culture, define a destination, and unlock a common passion in people that is as different as it is familiar. His enthusiasm, authority on sport and understanding of the issues of climate change make Jones a key player in sport and sustainability. Natalie Spilger, a professional soccer player, founded the athletic sustainability program GreenLaces in 2008. GreenLaces is a nonprofit organization that encourages athletes to be global leaders. The organization works with youth athletic leagues and after-school programs to educate children on the importance of recycling and eco-friendly lifestyles. It also recruits professional athletes that work to protect the environment to make their efforts public by publishing them online. Prior to that she worked with Connecticut-based EMCOR Energy Services as an energy engineer.Wolff has been a writer for Sports Illustrated since 1980 and, in March 2007, wrote a ground-breaking article titled Going, Going Green, an article that helped sports fans measure the effects of climate change on sport. Wolff is also the owner of the Vermont Frost Heaves, a premier basketball league team based in Williston. The Frost Heaves have taken on a number of sustainability measures to reduce their carbon footprint. Recently, the Heaves became athlete ambassadors to the climate change advocacy group 350.org.For more information, contact Andrew Gardner in the Department of Athletics at 802.443.5963 or agardner@middlebury.edu(link sends e-mail).last_img read more

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Brazil Sends Post-hurricane Humanitarian Aid to Haiti

first_imgBy Patrícia Comunello/Diálogo October 19, 2016 One hundred and twenty tents provided by the Brazilian Civil Defense to house Haitian families, arrived in Port-au-Prince on Friday, October 14th, aboard a Boeing 767-300 of the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym). Additional shipments will be sent by air before the end of the month. The aircraft was deployed from the Corsair Squadron, based at Galeão Air Base in Rio de Janeiro. The tents are easy to handle and set up, with a PVC flooring and roof and tubular aluminum structure. “These characteristics allow for a better response in natural disaster situations,” explained the FAB’s communications department. “We left Rio de Janeiro with over 10 tons, and there are now 20 tons of equipment. For us, not just personally, but professionally, there is a lot of satisfaction in assisting a population that has suffered so much after a hurricane,” said Major Grei Santana, FAB commander. The aircraft took off from Brasilia Air Base at around 10:00 am, with the shipment and crew arriving at its destination after a seven-hour trip. After unloading, the Brazilian Armed Forces coordination unit at the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti took began distributing the tents. The Brazilian contingent is rebuilding roads and bridges, transporting provisions and even providing security for non-governmental humanitarian organizations helping those affected by the disaster. “In a country that has yet to recover from the traumas of the 2010 earthquake and is now facing the hurricane’s wrath, we know that, even indirectly, we are helping a lot of people. We very proudly fly the flags of the Corsair Squadron, the FAB, and Brazil,” said Captain Marcos Fassarella Olivieri, one of the aircraft’s pilots. Capt. Olivieri had already flown the Brasilia to Port-au-Prince route, delivering 17 tons of support provisions to service members in the Navy, Army, and Air Force who make up the Brazilian Peacekeeping Infantry Battalion and the Brazilian Peacekeeping Engineering Company in the 24th Brazilian Contingent of the Peacekeeping Force. They are part of the maintenance specialist teams deployed to assist in the hardest hit areas. The Brazilian government also announced on October 14th that it would provide $250,000 to the World Food Program. The funds will be used to immediately buy and distribute food and other items of basic necessity to victims of the hurricane, the Brazilian President’s Office reported in a note. The money will come from the international humanitarian cooperation budget of the Brazilian Cooperation Agency, in the Ministry of Foreign Relations. Brazil’s humanitarian response “Brazil’s humanitarian response is the result of integrated actions among the ministries of Foreign Relations, Health, National Integration, and Defense, and the goal is to mitigate the situation in Haiti, considered the most dramatic since the earthquake in 2010,” said the note from the federal government. The four ministries are considering new actions, such as sending humanitarian kits and medications. The FAB aircraft completed another flight between Brasilia and Port-au-Prince on Monday, October 17th, delivering donations such as food, cleaning supplies, warm clothing, and even school supplies for children. There have been 10 tons worth of donations collected by the Haiti Solidarity Network, which is a volunteer initiative, according to Colonel Joanes Gregoratto, assistant to the archbishop of the Military Ordinariate of Brazil, which operates within the Ministry of Defense. “A group of women created the network in 2015 and requested support from the Ministry of Defense to send the donations to religious institutions in the Caribbean country,” said Col. Gregoratto. He recalled that the 10-ton shipment was headed to schools in Port-au-Prince, “which should be distributed to families, mostly women and children, affected by the damage.” In November, another 75 tons of donations gathered by the volunteer network is scheduled to be shipped, but this time by boat. Col. Gregoratto stated that the Red Cross in Brazil is organizing a set of containers to be sent to Haiti.last_img read more

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Six ways baby boomers can improve their retirement

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » by: David DorionThe working world is changing. And as a Baby Boomer who plans to work past 65, you need to change along with it.Baby Boomers who are working beyond retirement may find themselves challenged by issues that might not have been considered earlier in their careers. From health concerns to keeping job skills up-to-date, it’s more important than ever for Baby Boomer workers to reinvent themselves.A new study from the nonprofit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® assesses the anticipations of Baby Boomer workers as they envision this new model for retirement, and looks to answer the inevitable question… “Baby Boomer Workers Are Revolutionizing Retirement: Are They and Their Employers Ready?”Here are six proactive steps you can take to help you stay employed and improve your retirement prospects.1. Stay healthy. Sixty-five percent of Baby Boomer workers are taking the necessary actions toward healthier lifestyles to remain on the job. With rising health care and disability costs, a healthy Baby Boomer worker, particularly one with experience in the workplace, can tend to be a very important resource to an employer.Take the action you need to eat properly, exercise and get plenty of rest. You might even consider a gym membership, and as far as nutrition, a quick Google search will help you find publications written with the Baby Boomer diet in mind.last_img read more

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Johnson City man sentenced for sexually exploiting child

first_imgSYRACUSE (WBNG) — The United States Department of Justice says a man from Johnson City was sentenced to 25 years in prison for sexually exploiting a child and distributing and possessing child pornography. He also secretly recorded the victim engaging in sexual activity and distributed the images and videos online, the Department of Justice says. This case was investigated by the FBI, the Johnson City Police Department, the Broome County Sheriff’s Department, and the Broome County District Attorney’s Office, and was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Michael D. Gadarian and Sahar Amandolare. He also admitted to possessing hundreds of images and videos of child pornography on electronic devices. In addition to his prison sentence, Rushmer was ordered to 10 years of supervised release and received a $9,000 fine. He will have to register as a sex offender. 48-year-old, Michael Rushmer pleaded guilty to creating sexually explicit images and videos of a minor. This case was prosecuted as part of Project Safe Childhood; for more information click here.last_img read more

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SpaceX Launches 4 Astronauts to ISS Aboard Crew Dragon ‘Resilience’

first_imgThe crew will dock at their destination at around 11:00 pm Monday night (9:30am Tuesday IST), joining two Russians and one American onboard the station, and stay for six months.In May, SpaceX completed a demonstration mission showing it could take astronauts to the ISS and bring them back safely, a landmark development allowing the US to begin travelling to the space station under its own power once more.The Crew Dragon earlier this week became the first spacecraft to be certified by NASA since the Space Shuttle nearly 40 years ago.It is a capsule, similar in shape to the spacecraft that preceded Space Shuttle, and its launch vehicle is a reusable SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.At the end of its missions, the Crew Dragon deploys parachutes and then splashes down in water, just as in the Apollo era.NASA turned to SpaceX and Boeing after shuttering the checkered Space Shuttle programme in 2011, which failed in its main objectives of making space travel affordable and safe.The agency will have spent more than $8 billion (roughly Rs. 59,600 crores) on the Commercial Crew program by 2024, with the hope that the private sector can take care of NASA’s needs in “low Earth orbit” so it is freed up to focus on return missions to the Moon and then on to Mars.SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk in 2002, has leapfrogged its much older rival Boeing, whose programme has floundered after a failed test of its uncrewed Starliner last year.Russians unimpressedBut SpaceX’s success won’t mean the US will stop hitching rides with Russia altogether, said Bridenstine.“We want to have an exchange of seats where American astronauts can fly on Russian Soyuz rockets and Russian cosmonauts can fly on commercial crew vehicles,” he said, explaining it was necessary in case either programme was down for a period of time.The reality, however, is that space ties between the US and Russia, one of the few bright spots in their bilateral relations, have frayed in recent years, and much remains uncertain.Russia has said it won’t be a partner in the Artemis program to return to the Moon in 2024, claiming the NASA-led mission is too US-centric.Dmitry Rogozin, the head of Russia’s space agency has also repeatedly mocked SpaceX’s technology, and this summer announced Roscosmos would build rockets that surpass Musk’s.He told a state news agency he was unimpressed with the Crew Dragon’s water landing, calling it “rather rough” and saying his agency was developing a methane rocket that will be reusable 100 times.But the fact that a national space agency feels moved to compare itself to a company is arguably a validation of NASA’s public-private strategy.SpaceX’s emergence has also deprived Roscosmos of a valuable income stream.The cost of round-trips on Russian rockets had been rising and stood at around $85 million (roughly Rs. 600 crores) per astronaut, according to estimates last year.Presidential transitionPresidential transitions are always a difficult time for NASA, and the ascension of Joe Biden in January is expected to be no different.The agency has yet to receive from Congress the tens of billions of dollars needed to finalise the Artemis program.Bridenstine has announced that he will step down, in order to let the new president set his own goals for space exploration.So far, Biden has not commented on the 2024 timeline.Democratic party documents say they support NASA’s Moon and Mars aspirations, but also emphasise elevating the agency’s Earth sciences division to better understand how climate change is affecting our planet.Will Apple Silicon Lead to Affordable MacBooks in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Crew members of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket gesture as they depart for the launch padUS President-elect Joe Biden hailed the launch on Twitter as a “testament to the power of science and what we can accomplish by harnessing our innovation, ingenuity, and determination,” while President Donald Trump called it “great.” Vice President Mike Pence, who attended the launch with his wife Karen, called it a “new era in human space exploration in America.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Four astronauts were successfully launched on the SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience to the International Space Station on Sunday, the first of what the US hopes will be many routine missions following a successful test flight in late spring.Three Americans, Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and Japan’s Soichi Noguchi blasted off at 7:27pm (5:57am Monday IST) from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, thus ending almost a decade of international reliance on Russia for rides on its Soyuz rockets.- Advertisement – The Pences joined NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine and his wife Michelle to watch the launch, clapping as the rocket lifted off.The capsule successfully separated from the second stage of the rocket and, according to a SpaceX team member speaking over radio, had achieved “nominal orbit insertion.”That means the capsule is currently on the right trajectory to reach the ISS.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, May 3

first_imgNational Grid’s pipeline justification is to prevent an energy shortage, which is rare. Another rationale is to meet a projected increase in “energy demand of 1.1 percent per year, which is easily met by very attainable “demand response” reduction measures such as use of renewables, conservation and efficiencies.Please help to stop this environmental threat by writing to: beckyjmeier@gmail.com or to: info@stopnypipeline.org.Consider submitting public comments to the state Public Service Commission, the lead agency, by going to: http://documents.dps.ny.gov/public/Comments/PublicComments.aspx?MatterCaseNo=19-T-0069.To get comment ideas and to read the actual resolution against the pipeline passed by the East Greenbush Town Board, go to: http://www.caseonline.org.The purported deadline for public comments was April 24, but one can still make public comments.Public officials of Albany or Rensselaer county or residents of Bethlehem, East Greenbush or North Greenbush have a right to register with the state Public Service Commission to obtain “party status.” This entitles one to “special rights.”For much more detailed information about this fracked gas proposal, go to: Nothing to admire about Donald TrumpPoor Dave Edwards in his April 22 letter, still attempting to defend the indefensible and reprehensible corrupt liar-in-chief, convinced that in 2016, Trump won “fair and square.”  Has he even read the Mueller Report (MR) regarding Russian interference in the U.S. election?  Russian interference was “sweeping and systematic.” It continues to this day. This administration ignores calls to increase security on our election system.   Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionNext president must  possess empathy After attending a lecture on the book “Leadership in Turbulent Times” by Doris Kearns Goodwin, the person speaking about the book highlighted admirable qualities of our greatest past American leaders such as Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.One quality which is often forgotten during the intensity of the election period, is “empathy.”The leaders noted above displayed empathy as they led the country. They were able to lead keeping in mind the pain and challenges faced by ordinary Americans. Consider the human side of license issueThe April 26 Gazette editorial opposing driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants asks, “Who are these politicians who support this idea listening to?” As a supporter of the proposed legislation, I feel they have been listening to me, among many others across New York state. In turn, I have been listening to immigrant members of our community right here in the Capital Region:The farmworker who needs a ride to the ICE office in Latham so he can check in for his monthly appointment, in compliance with the law. The mother who needs a ride to an appointment at her child’s school, where the child is legally enrolled, although both mother and child are undocumented immigrants. The older sister, an undocumented immigrant, who needs to transport her younger sister, a U.S. citizen, to a medical appointment. In each of these cases, driver’s licenses would help people respond to legitimate needs.As these examples demonstrate, the real circumstances are much more complex than people answering a simple poll question are likely to take into account. In my experience, the more people understand the complexity, the more likely they are to favor “Green Light” driver’s license legislation.We all need to respect the rule of law. But as citizens, we also have the responsibility of making sure that our laws respect the real human beings who live among us and make valuable contributions to our community. For this reason above all, the Green Light driver’s license bill deserves our support.Terry DiggorySaratoga SpringsThe writer is a co-coordinator of the Saratoga Immigration Coalition. On April 25, we took our grandson to Jumping Jacks. My husband had his Vietnam Veterans cap on. Our son had bought him the hat and told him to wear it and be proud as he is proud of him.When we went to pay for our order, the cashier said to my husband, “Thank you for your service and you do not have to pay for your order.” A person paid for our order and wanted to be anonymous. My husband wanted to thank this person, as he has been home a little over 47 years from the war and this is the first time someone has ever done something like this. He was very touched and surprised.We are hoping that the person who did this reads The Gazette so that they will know how much this thoughtfulness meant to a Vietnam Veteran. May God bless you always and thank you from the bottom of our hearts.   John and Diane RourkeSchenectady Vietnam veteran touched by gesture They find whatever space they can for senior apartments. See what can be done. The CVS has a pretty big parking lot, which is located in the center of Broadway, Curry Road, Mariaville and Duanesburg Road.Carole RyanRotterdam http://documents.dps.ny.gov/public/MatterManagement/CaseMaster.aspx?MatterCaseNo=19-T-0069&submit=Search.Robert ConnorsCanaan 5 Corners area needs to have a food storeI feel we should have a mini-mart or some food store at 5 Corners in Rotterdam. You have people from Duanesburg, Mariaville and Westhill who have to drive to Price Chopper or Hannaford or go to Cobleskill. Speak out against pipeline proposalOn April 17, the Town Board of East Greenbush voted unanimously against the proposed Capital District “E37 Resiliency & Reliability” fracked gas pipeline.Citizens need to fight for a better environmental solution to our energy needs, while protesting the paucity and limited nature of National Grid’s pipeline announcements.  Thanks for coverage of mayor’s passingI want to thank The Gazette for all the wonderful coverage concerning my father, Frank J. Duci. You certainly have touched on issues and his life from a personal point of view. I sincerely appreciate all the time and energy covering my father’s life and it will always be remembered.Sincerely, his daughter,Nancy Duci DenofioSaratoga Springs The MR is damning, noting nearly a dozen examples of obstruction by Trump. If Trump were an ordinary citizen, he would be indicted.Upon learning of the appointment of the special counsel, he whined, “I’m f—-d.”  Words of an innocent man? And there’s his tax returns. What’s he hiding?Trump has proposed cutting billions from Medicare and Medicaid, wants the ACA gone, and gave tax cuts to the wealthy and large corporations, sending the deficit into the stratosphere. Please note that this decade-long strong economy was built on the basis of the Obama recovery.Trump deals in fear, hate and intimidation. Mr. Edwards admires a charlatan, science denier, cheat and bigot who idolizes dictators and who takes perverse pleasure in name-calling, among other disgusting traits unless he’s defending white nationalists (Remember Charlottesville?). He just did that again.There is nothing remotely admirable about Trump. He’s an ignorant fool and continues to soil the office of the presidency.Cynthia SwansonNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists While considering the important issues they focused less on politics and more on solutions for what the country was going through.If there is one takeaway for our current president, it is for him to consider taking out the “me” factor from governing and replace it with the “we” factor for his governing.I hope that we will be reflective enough to never again select a leader who, in spite of their ability to persuade us, will not cause us to waver from this awareness.We will do much better with a leader who will demonstrate empathy and understanding of America’s best principles and commit to address the issues of all Americans, not just their political base.Bill ShapiroSchenectadylast_img read more

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‘One lap too many’: Motorsport ‘icon and legend’ Stirling Moss dies, aged 90

first_imgTributes flooded in from the world of motorsport and beyond to the gifted and revered driver who never won the Formula One title, finishing runner-up four times and third three times.”Today we say goodbye to Sir Stirling Moss, the racing legend,” reigning world champion Lewis Hamilton wrote on Instagram.”Two people from massively different times and backgrounds but we clicked and ultimately found that the love for racing we both shared made us comrades,” added the six-time world champion.Meanwhile, three-time world champion Jackie Stewart, who came into Grand Prix racing shortly after Moss’s injury-enforced retirement in the early 1960s, told the BBC: “I think he’s probably the best example of a racing driver there’s ever been. Stirling Moss, widely-regarded as the greatest motor racing driver never to win the world title, has died aged 90 following a long illness.”It was one lap too many,” his wife Susie Moss told Britain’s Press Association on Sunday.”He just closed his eyes.” Topics : “He walked like a racing driver, he talked like a racing driver, he behaved like a racing driver should behave.”Former England striker Gary Lineker posted on Instagram: “Sir Stirling Moss has reached life’s checkered flag, and what a race he drove. Wonderful driver and a lovely man. RIP.”British media reported Moss had succumbed to a chest infection he caught in Singapore in December 2016 that saw him retire from public life two years later. There is no suggestion his death was linked to the coronavirus.In an era when it was common for drivers to race in different disciplines, Moss won 212 of the 529 races he entered over a 14-year career that started in 1948.His victories included the 1955 Mille Miglia, where he set a course record in the 1,000 mile event, which took place on public roads in Italy. Renowned sportsmanship In Formula One, Moss won 16 races, with his first victory coming in the 1955 British Grand Prix at Liverpool that saw him become the first British winner.Moss had the misfortune to compete in the same era as the great Argentine Juan Manuel Fangio, who won the F1 championship five times.His renowned sportsmanship cost Moss the 1958 title when he defended the conduct of British rival Mike Hawthorn following a spin at the Portuguese Grand Prix.Moss’ action helped spare Hawthorn a six-point penalty, with Hawthorn winning the title by a single point.”I had no hesitation in doing it,” Moss recalled. “I can’t see how this is open to debate. The fact that he was my only rival in the championship didn’t come into my thinking. Absolutely not.”His top-level career in motorsport came to an end in 1962 following a crash at the Goodwood track in Sussex, southern England, that left Moss in a coma for a month and partially paralyzed for six months.But such was the enduring fame of the debonair driver that, for decades afterwards, the rhetorical phrase “Who do you think you are, Stirling Moss?” was supposedly the standard question all British policemen asked speeding motorists.”Yes a policeman did once ask me,” Moss told the Daily Telegraph in a 2012 interview. “But I couldn’t work out if he was taking the mick [joking].”He was knighted in the New Year Honors list in 2000 for services to motor racing.For F1 pundit and former driver Martin Brundle, Moss was “a mighty racer and gentleman”.”He had a press on style on the track and in life,” Brundle posted on Twitter.”Remarkable man. Survived the most dangerous era of motorsport and died today aged 90. He had such great stories to tell, and it was a privilege to know him.”Former world heavyweight boxing champion Frank Bruno revealed that Moss had “privately supported me over many years”.”My thoughts are with his family and all that had the pleasure of knowing him”.last_img read more

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