1st private space crew paying $55M each to fly to station

first_imgCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The first private space station crew has been introduced a year ahead of the planned launch. A Houston company on Tuesday identified the three men who are paying $55 million each to fly to the International Space Station next January atop a SpaceX rocket. They include a real estate and tech entrepreneur from Dayton, Ohio; a Canadian financier; and an Israeli businessman. They’ll be led by a former NASA astronaut now working for Axiom. Tom Cruise was mentioned last year as a potential crew member. There’s no word on whether he’ll catch the next Axiom flight.last_img read more

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Editorial: An ‘Irresponsible’ Governor Thwarts Renewables

first_imgEditorial: An ‘Irresponsible’ Governor Thwarts Renewables FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Indianapolis Business Journal:Gov. Mike Pence says Indiana has “never picked a pencil up” to work on a state energy plan to comply with new federal clean air rules.And Pence told The Indianapolis Star that his administration has no plans to ever do so, especially now that the U.S. Supreme Court has put the rules on hold as it reviews several legal challenges, including one in which Indiana is a plaintiff.That is irresponsible.If the Pence administration does not create a plan to try to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and the high court upholds the Environmental Protection Agency rules, the state could become a slave to federal regulations that were not created with Indiana in mind.Business leaders and utility officials know this. Mark Maassel, president of the Indiana Energy Association, which represents the state’s investor-owned utilities, told IBJ late last year that the state needs a plan in place in case the federal Clean Power Plan is upheld.Make no mistake. Maassel and many other business leaders support Pence’s decision to sue President Obama’s administration to stop the implementation of the rules, which are meant to reduce carbon dioxide emissions 32 percent by 2030. That could be especially difficult for Indiana, where 80 percent of the state’s net energy generation comes from coal—compared with about 35 percent nationally.That’s why Indiana should tackle the problem on its own, rather than letting federal regulators tell it what to do. Crafting a state plan to reduce emissions gives the Pence administration the chance to bring together stakeholders, including utilities and the coal industry as well as environmental groups and health care leaders. It lets the state be creative in its approach and ensures that some one-size-fits-all federal mandate isn’t dropped on Hoosier businesses and utilities.A state plan also acknowledges that diversifying our energy sources and cleaning up our air is a worthy goal—and it clearly is. Regardless of whether the U.S. Supreme Court upholds the federal rules, the state would benefit from having discussed and debated its options.That doesn’t have to mean completely abandoning coal. In truth, that can’t and won’t happen in Indiana anytime soon. But a plan for Indiana’s energy future can include how to help the 3,600 people who work in Indiana’s coal mining industry. The move away from coal nationally is real, and pretending that it’s not happening won’t make it go away.Pence owes it to Hoosiers to put his regulators to work on a clean energy plan now—whether the Supreme Court throws out the EPA rules or not. Doing anything else is irresponsible.Pence’s stubborn energy stance ill-serves statelast_img read more

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Mountain Mama: Month One of Marathon Training Under the Belt

first_img“Our greatest glory is not in never failing but in rising up every time we fail.” ~ Ralph Waldo EmersonBeing videotaped while I ran was only slightly better than someone watching me try on bikinis under those terrible fluorescent lights that accentuate every flaw. Knowing that someone was watching me run made me cringe. Was my arm flab jiggling? Was I standing up straight? Was my head dragging behind my body? Were my ankles relaxed? Was my cadence fast enough? Did my butt look massive?When Thomas Minton, running guru extraordinaire, agreed to help me with my technique, I jumped at the chance. I was fine with the prospect of all-over soreness, early morning alarms, and alcohol-free Friday nights. But when I read the “filming” dates listed on the training schedule I broke into a cold sweat.But a promise is a promise. I’d committed to the Charleston marathon. And to prepare for it, I’d do whatever Thomas suggested, even the videotaping. But first, I spent most of the month preparing by skipping, shuffling sideways, falling into trees, and hopping. After each technique session I dutifully checked off the run from the training schedule I’d hung on my fridge. Curiously missing was actually running, except for the weekly “long” run that still hovered in the single digits.Friends saw me running in the park and sent texts. I drove by and wondered why that woman was running backwards. Then I realized it was you. When I skipped and shuffled my way through San Francisco during breaks from a writing conference, a city where nothing should be shocking, people did double takes.I didn’t care about the curious looks I got – turns out I love to skip. Swinging my arms and bounding high into the air makes me feel about ten years old. And shuffling sideways, a move my running guru refers to as the “karaoke drill” and aerobic instructors dub the “grapevine” makes me want to toss my head back and giggle. I still struggle to pick up my feet while running backwards, a drill Thomas promises will improve the pull phase of my running.After skipping, falling, shuffling, and running backwards I was starting to feel like the boy in Karate Kid, wondering if all the drills would translate into 26.2 miles of running. I began to doubt that I was accomplishing anything besides entertaining onlookers. Thomas sent me a message about meeting for our advanced technique session, which would end with videotaping.The session started with some barefoot running. My feet felt so light. I could feel when my ankles were tight and I landed hard. The contrast between how my fell naturally when I relaxed my foot surprised me. So I let go.Then Thomas helped me with pacing.“Pull now. Pull, pull, pull.”I followed his lead, feeling a little bit quicker. The next lap my feet were lighter still. The wind flirted with my skin and blew my hair into tangles. A rush of heady freedom filled me. It was the first time that I’d considered this running thing might be something I wanted to do instead of something I was making myself do.“You’re form is looking better. Ready for me to film you?” Thomas asked.I gulped. “No,” I said, before I considered how ungracious I sounded. How bad could it be? He just said you’re form is getting better. Just do it.“Just kidding, I’m ready.”Thomas told me to start skipping and then run past the camera. My heart fluttered and I felt my body tense, feeling incredibly self-conscious. I forced myself to lift my knees, skipping and then transitioning to a run. Was I over-striding? Was my pull too slow? Was my ankle too tight? Was my body springy? The more I wondered, the tighter I felt. This running business was turning out to be way more complicated than I thought.A few minutes later Thomas critiqued as he pushed play. “So the landing is looking better. The foot is much more relaxed. There’s your running pose.” He paused the frame. “We’ll need to work on your posture, the shoulders collapsing, the head going back.”Whew, we were done. It wasn’t so bad after all. So there was the matter of my posture and finding how to pull my shoulders down. All those years hunched up over a computer weren’t helping. But Thomas had more drills. There was help. I wasn’t destined to be a slouched over runner forever.As I walked back to my truck, I wondered why I had been so scared and reluctant to see my running up close on a screen. The thing is I’m a bit of a perfectionist. I like to get things right, I live for praise. The discomfort of witnessing my own failure overwhelmed me. That filming session and the first month of marathon training has taught me that the only way to improve is to work through all my imperfections, with my eyes wide open.last_img read more

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A $70,000 “minimum wage.” What could go wrong?

first_imgYou may recall the “heroic” CEO who took a pay cut and reduced profits to give starting employees at his payments company a $70,000 salary.The CEO was trying to address income inequality. The initial feedback was overwhelmingly positive from employees, civic leaders and the general public.But there were doubters. This feedback comes from a NYT article written at the time of the announcement:Sandi Krakowski, an author and Facebook marketing expert, posted on Twitter: “His mind-set will hurt everyone in the end. He’s young. He has a good intent, but wrong method.”Patrick R. Rogers, an associate professor of strategic management at the School of Business and Economics at North Carolina A&T State University, wrote in an email: “The sad thing is that Mr. Price probably thinks happy workers are productive workers. However, there’s just no evidence that this is true. So he’ll improve happiness, only in the short term, and will not improve productivity. Which doesn’t bode well for his long-term viability as a firm.” continue reading » 29SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Istrian olive oil from Novigrad won gold medals in Paris and New York

first_imgCroatian olive oils won 27 gold and 11 silver medals, and two oils were named the best in their category in the United States at the New York International Olive Oil Competition, NYOOC, where a group of international experts tasted samples of nearly 700 extra virgin olive oils from all over the world to decide who deserves to be recognized as the best olive oil in the world.One of the winners is the Istrian olive oil Vergal Frantoio from Novigrad, which won gold medals both in New York and in Paris. At the NYOOC, Vergal Frantoio olive oil was declared one of the world’s best oils for 2018 and won a gold medal in the category of monoculture oils of mild fruitiness. By the way, this world competition has attracted more than 900 entries from 27 countries this year.At the same time, on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, specifically in Paris, the non-profit organization L’Agence pour la Valorisation des Produits Agricoles, AVPA, which brings together producers from around the world, awarded the Gourmet Gold Medal for the Frantoio variety, extra virgin olive oil Vergal. AVPA discovers the best among the best and rewards them, and this year the 16th International Seed Edible Oils Competition was held, in which about 300 submitted vegetable oils (olive oils, cereal oils, nuts and flavored oils) from five continents took part.It is interesting how the producers of the award-winning olive oil Vergal Frantoio Aminess are hotels and camps, one of the leading Croatian tourist companies, which since 2005 have grown varieties of frantoio, leccino and Istrian bjelica in their olive groves located near hotels and camps by the sea. , and chefs at Aminess restaurants use Vergal olive oil in their daily cooking.”Our oil has won numerous awards so far and has been included five times in the specialized guide Flos Olei, which provides an overview of the best extra virgin olive oils in the world. We are extremely glad to be recognized at European and world competitions and that Vergal Frantoio has its place among the best oils, which has further confirmed the quality and indisputability of belonging to the very top of world-renowned olive oils. “, said Alen Fiala, head of the Aminess brand Vergal.last_img read more

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Italy starts to look ahead to ‘phase two’ as COVID-19 death toll slows

first_imgBut alongside the public health crisis, the government is also grappling with the economic devastation caused by the sudden halt to business across the country.Following several days of encouraging data, Health Minister Roberto Speranza outlined a series of measures, including more testing and a beefed up local health system, intended to allow a gradual easing until a vaccine might be developed.”There are difficult months ahead. Our task is to create the conditions to live with the virus,” at least until a vaccine is developed, he told the daily La Repubblica newspaper.The national lockdown, strictly limiting people’s movements and freezing all non-essential economic activity, will officially last until at least April 13 but it is widely expected to be extended. Speranza said it was too early to say when it could be lifted.The minister said he had issued a note outlining five principles around which the government planned to manage the so-called “phase two” of the emergency, when lockdown restrictions began to be eased but before a full return to normal conditions.He said social distancing would have to remain, with wider use of individual protection devices such as face masks, while local health systems would be strengthened, to allow a faster and more efficient treatment of suspected COVID-19 cases.Testing and “contact tracing” would be extended, including with the use of smartphone apps and other forms of digital technology while a network of hospitals dedicated solely to treating COVID-19 patients would be set up. “If this is confirmed, we need to start thinking about the second phase and keep down the spread of this disease.”The total number of confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus rose by 4,316 to 128,948, the lowest increase in five days, which added to signs the epidemic has reached a plateau, about six weeks after it broke out in northern Italy on Feb. 21.Sunday’s figures added to growing signs the tough restrictions on movement and public gatherings imposed across the country on March 9 were having an effect in containing the epidemic, but officials have been desperate to avoid a letup.”Don’t lower our guard, stay at home,” Angelo Borelli, head of the Civil Protection department, told a daily briefing. Italy reported its lowest daily COVID-19 death toll for more than two weeks on Sunday as authorities began to look ahead to a second phase of the battle against the new coronavirus once the lockdown imposed almost a month ago is eventually eased.The toll from the world’s deadliest outbreak reached 15,887, almost a quarter of the global death total, but the rise of 525 from a day earlier was the smallest daily increase since March 19, while the number of patients in badly stretched intensive care units fell for a second day running.”The curve has reached a plateau and begun to descend,” said Silvio Brusaferro, head of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy’s top health institute. “It is a result that we have to achieve day after day.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Wolf Administration Provides Personnel Update at DDAP

first_imgWolf Administration Provides Personnel Update at DDAP Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that Gary Tennis will no longer serve as Secretary of the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs. Deputy Secretary Jennifer Smith will serve as Acting Secretary.“I look forward to working with Acting Secretary Jennifer Smith to continue my administration’s fight against the opioid epidemic. Though we have made great strides in our efforts, we still have much work to do. Jennifer Smith’s experience and expertise will be an asset to my administration as we move forward to help those in our commonwealth who are struggling with substance use disorder.”The Wolf Administration has made the fight against the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis a top priority.  Governor Wolf worked with the legislature to secure $20.4 million in the 2016-17 budget to combat Pennsylvania’s heroin crisis by expanding treatment options for Pennsylvanians struggling with opioid use disorder.This funding was used to create 45 Centers of Excellence through the Department of Human Services, which will serve as central hubs that provide navigators to assist those with opioid use disorders with behavioral and physical health care, along with medication-assisted treatment, as needed.After addressing a joint session of the legislature, Governor Wolf worked with leaders on both sides of the aisle to pass legislation to battle Pennsylvania’s heroin and opioid epidemic. The legislation passed strengthened the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, restricted the number of pills that can be prescribed to minors or in emergency rooms, established education curriculum on safe prescribing, and created more locations for the drop-off of prescription drugs.In the first year of his administration, Governor Wolf stood with Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine as Dr. Levine signed a standing order making it possible for all Pennsylvanians to access naloxone, a medication that can reverse an overdose that is caused by an opioid drug. The governor has also made getting naloxone into the hands of more people a priority. On April 7, 2015, Governor Wolf announced the Pennsylvania State Police would carry naloxone, through a combination of grants from Aetna, Geisinger Health, Health Partner Plans, and Highmark. Additionally, the Wolf Administration has partnered with Adapt Pharma to offer free naloxone to schools.Governor Wolf is committed to continuing his fight against the opioid epidemic and has prioritized it in his 2017-2018 budget.Jennifer Smith BiographyJennifer (Jen) Smith most recently served as the Deputy Secretary for the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP).Following her college graduation in 2004, she accepted a position in Pennsylvania’s Office of the Budget as an accountant where she focused primarily on monitoring accounts receivables, processing loan payments, reconciling accounts for the Public Utility Commission and the Pennsylvania State Police. Through 2009, she continued to work in various accountant positions in the Office of the Budget, serving as the co-lead on an effort to train hundreds of employees throughout the state on a new process for recording revenue.  She also worked on an 18-month initiative to restructure and redesign business processes for Comptroller Operations, which is the largest office within OB.  During this project, Jen served as the Communications, Change Management and Training Lead, played a key role as the liaison between OB and all other agencies as it related to the changes being implemented, and in the summer of 2009 took over the role of Project Manager to oversee the final phases of implementation.In 2009, Smith became the Director for Strategic Planning and Communications within the Office of the Budget.  Three years later she was promoted to the Bureau Director for Planning and Management.  In November of 2015, Smith accepted the position of Deputy Secretary for the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs.She currently resides in Jonestown with her husband of 14 years, their four children and two dogs.  In addition to spending time with her family, she enjoys participating as an active member of the Annville Church of the Brethren. January 24, 2017center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Eugene O. Nobbe, 69

first_imgEugene O. Nobbe, 69, of Greensburg passed away on Wednesday, August 10, 2016 in Columbus.  Gene was born on January 13, 1947 in Greensburg, the son of Edwin and Loretta (Bedel) Nobbe.  Gene graduated from Greensburg High School.  He was a former member of the Army Reserve.  He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church and a member of the Knights of Columbus in Greensburg.  Gene worked as a farmer in Decatur County his entire life.  He was married to Sharon A. Vonderheide in Rushville on August 9, 1969 and she survives.  Gene is survived by his wife; Sharon, five children; Melinda J. Nobbe, Columbus, Kevin E. (Jennifer) Nobbe, Greensburg, Carrie A. (Herb) Somers, Greensburg, Dianna M. (Richard) Slayten, Greenwood, Sarah G. (Scott) Rohls, Greensburg, 4 brothers; Walter (Judy) Nobbe, Connersville, Leon (Carole Ann) Nobbe, Greensburg, Herman (Theresa) Nobbe, Greensburg, Robert (Linda) Nobbe, Greensburg, 4 sisters; Betty Nobbe, Greensburg, Marlene Meyer, Greensburg, Delores (Lawrence) Young, Greensburg, Susan (Wayne) Munson, Rushville, and 11 grandchildren; Brook Somers, Bridget Nobbe, Maria Nobbe, Makayla Somers, Sydney Rohls, Michael Nobbe, Taylor Somers, Sophie Rohls, Sterling Rohls, Chloe Somers, and Nolan Slayten.  Gene was preceded in death by his parents.  A Rosary Service will be held at Porter-Oliger-Pearson Funeral Home in Greensburg on Sunday at 1:30 pm followed by visitation from 2 to 6 pm.  A Funeral Mass will be held at 11:00 am on Monday, August 15 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Greensburg with Rev. John Meyer officiating.  Burial will follow at St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.  Memorials can be made to the St. Mary’s Church Building Fund.Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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July court date set for child molesting case

first_imgVersailles, In. — Following an investigation by Indiana State Police Dustin Crabtree is facing multiple charges and Ripley County court date in July. Crabtree has been charged with two counts of child molesting and possession of a firearm by a serious violent felon.Crabtree was convicted in 2006 of felony burglary in Dearborn County.Reports indicate the alleged incidents took place with a four-year-old.last_img

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Lambert: I can handle criticism

first_img Lambert and Reds boss Brendan Rodgers are good friends, and he feels Liverpool could finally claim a first Premier League title this season. “They’ve a chance, no two ways about it,” said Lambert. “Brendan’s a really good guy who did well at Swansea and has enhanced Liverpool. “In my era, Liverpool dominated everything with Kenny (Dalglish) and those guys. “Now whether they can win it this year, I don’t know, but they are certainly in with a shout. “With Luis Suarez, he is probably one of the top players in Europe right now, with the way he has been performing, the way he is playing, the confidence. “Everything he does comes off. He was a top player last year, but he seems to have gone up to another level this season.” Lambert will at least have two new faces on show to bolster his squad in striker Grant Holt and defender Ryan Bertrand, signed this week on loan until the end of the season from Wigan and Chelsea respectively. “Holt was a no-brainer for me,” said Lambert. “For the three years he was with me at Norwich he was fantastic. He was a big character. I know what I’m going to get, I know what he can give to the club, and I think he’ll surprise a few people. “As for Ryan, he brings a lot of big-game experience, not only in the league but even a Champions League final which Chelsea won, so he’ll be really good for us. “The way he plays the game, and as a person too, he’ll fit in here great.” Lambert is, however, without defender Nathan Baker who suffered a concussion during Monday’s 2-1 defeat at home to Arsenal which resulted in his withdrawal after 21 minutes. Lambert said: “Nathan’s still not feeling good. He’s still feeling a bit groggy, he’s got a bit of a sore head, so he’s unavailable.” Villa, meanwhile, have been ordered by a tribunal to pay £450,000 to Norwich for goalkeeper Jed Steer following his move in the summer. Press Association Villa’s increasingly worrying home form in particular has resulted in Lambert coming in for criticism midway through his second season in charge. Villa have failed to win any of their last six matches in front of their own fans, with the nadir a 2-1 defeat to League One side Sheffield United in the FA Cup earlier this month. Lambert, however, is adamant he has broad enough shoulders to cope with the snipers, especially after his time as a player with Celtic and their bitter local rivalry with Rangers. Reflecting on the comments now to then, Lambert said: “I used to walk the streets of Glasgow at times and….(exhales a deep breath). If you can handle Glasgow then you can handle a lot of places. “Criticism is part of the game. You take it on the chin and you try and move on and learn from it. You stay level, which is important.” Crucially for Lambert, he received a resounding vote of confidence from chief executive Paul Faulkner this week, citing that he and owner Randy Lerner have absolute trust in the Scot. That is music to Lambert’s ears as he said: “It’s always good to get support from people. “But I’ve never lost my focus. Everybody knows football – one minute you are up, the next you are down. “Very rarely do you get an even keel. It’s just learning to live with that kind of situation. The more experience you get and the older you get, you live with the situation.” Although Villa’s away record is far better than that at home this season, they face a tough task in their latest Barclays Premier League quest at Liverpool on Saturday. Aston Villa manager Paul Lambert has revealed the flak flying his way is nothing compared to what he has previously experienced in Glasgow.last_img read more

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